Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Menlo Park, CA, United States

Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2014

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is to strengthen the competitive position of membrane companies in the natural gas treatment market. This would also allow users to benefit from the ease of processing and environmental advantages offered by membranes at substantially reduced costs. Natural gas processing to remove carbon dioxide and other contaminants is the largest industrial gas separation application. At present, membrane processes have 10% of the U.S. market of $1.2 billion. Amine absorption technology is the current industry standard. But membranes provide both cost and environmental advantages over amine absorption. The U.S. Energy Information Administration projects a rapid rise in domestic natural gas production over the next two decades. The expanding natural gas market presents a timely opportunity for membrane companies to acquire a greater market share. Today's membranes lose too much methane with the removed carbon dioxide. If more selective membranes could be made, the process would be much more widely used. This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I Project work is targeted at developing advanced membranes for natural gas purification. At the high pressures and high CO2 concentrations in natural gas processing, the CO2/CH4 selectivity of commercial cellulose acetate membranes is 12 to 15. This modest selectivity has limited the application of membranes. Better membranes with higher CO2/CH4 selectivities are required. The objective of the proposed project is to achieve a mixed-gas CO2/CH4 selectivity of 30 and CO2 permeance of 400 gpu, which would be more than twice the levels of separation currently available from cellulose acetate membranes. To achieve this goal, we propose to use polymer/metal-organic framework (MOF) hybrid materials to develop advanced membranes for CO2/CH4 separation. Molecularly tailored MOFs will be added into suitable polymer matrices, to enhance CO2/CH4 diffusivity selectivity or CO2/CH4 solubility selectivity. This project will make thin-film composite membranes using different polymer/MOF combinations and evaluate the CO2/CH4 separation properties. Successful development of polymer/MOF-membranes can significantly reduce operating cost by 30 percent and capital cost by 40 percent. This could be transformative in natural gas processing. The proposed technology can potentially be extended to other applications such as hydrogen/carbon dioxide and olefin/paraffin separations.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: STTR PHASE I | Award Amount: 225.00K | Year: 2015

The broader impact/commercial potential of this Small Business Technology Transfer Program Phase I project could lead to a dramatic improvement in natural gas processing economics using membrane technology. Natural gas processing is the largest industrial gas separation application, and natural gas separation equipment currently represents a market of approximately $3-5 billion per year. Due to high energy intensity and environmental concerns with currently dominant amine systems, gas processors are seeking alternative separation options. Membrane technology offers many advantages including clean, simple, and efficient operation. However, expanded use of clean membrane technology has been hindered by insufficient separation performance of existing membranes. If successfully developed, the new perfluoro polymeric composite membranes to be developed in this project will strengthen the competitive position of membrane technology in the natural gas treatment market, allowing users to capture the ease of processing and environmental advantages offered by membranes. If gas selectivity and permeance targets are met, significant reductions in the operating cost (up to 30%) and in the capital cost (up to 40%) can be achieved. Corresponding gas processing costs would also drop about 35%. The proposed technology can potentially be extended to other applications such as H2/CH4, He/CH4, and olefin/paraffin separations.

The objectives of this Phase I research project are to optimize synthesis of new perfluoro dioxolane copolymers and to fabricate these materials into robust composite membranes, whose gas separation performance is superior to commercially available membranes. Building on recent synthesis work at NYU, a series of perfluoro dioxolane copolymers will be prepared to study structure/property relationships. Optimization of the polymerization reaction will be carried out to obtain the targeted copolymers with optimized gas separation performance, reasonably low cost, excellent chemical and thermal stability, good film-forming properties and solvent-processability. The resulting copolymers will be fabricated into thin-film composite membranes and tested with industrially relevant mixtures at MTR. At the end of the Phase I project, the most promising copolymer will be selected for scale up and commercialization in a Phase II program.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2014

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is to strengthen the competitive position of membrane companies in the natural gas treatment market. This would also allow users to benefit from the ease of processing and environmental advantages offered by membranes at substantially reduced costs. Natural gas processing to remove carbon dioxide and other contaminants is the largest industrial gas separation application. At present, membrane processes have 10% of the U.S. market of $1.2 billion. Amine absorption technology is the current industry standard. But membranes provide both cost and environmental advantages over amine absorption. The U.S. Energy Information Administration projects a rapid rise in domestic natural gas production over the next two decades. The expanding natural gas market presents a timely opportunity for membrane companies to acquire a greater market share. Todays membranes lose too much methane with the removed carbon dioxide. If more selective membranes could be made, the process would be much more widely used.

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I Project work is targeted at developing advanced membranes for natural gas purification. At the high pressures and high CO2 concentrations in natural gas processing, the CO2/CH4 selectivity of commercial cellulose acetate membranes is 12 to 15. This modest selectivity has limited the application of membranes. Better membranes with higher CO2/CH4 selectivities are required. The objective of the proposed project is to achieve a mixed-gas CO2/CH4 selectivity of 30 and CO2 permeance of 400 gpu, which would be more than twice the levels of separation currently available from cellulose acetate membranes. To achieve this goal, we propose to use polymer/metal-organic framework (MOF) hybrid materials to develop advanced membranes for CO2/CH4 separation. Molecularly tailored MOFs will be added into suitable polymer matrices, to enhance CO2/CH4 diffusivity selectivity or CO2/CH4 solubility selectivity. This project will make thin-film composite membranes using different polymer/MOF combinations and evaluate the CO2/CH4 separation properties. Successful development of polymer/MOF-membranes can significantly reduce operating cost by 30 percent and capital cost by 40 percent. This could be transformative in natural gas processing. The proposed technology can potentially be extended to other applications such as hydrogen/carbon dioxide and olefin/paraffin separations.


Patent
Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. | Date: 2015-07-01

A process for treating an effluent gas stream arising from a manufacturing operation that produces an olefin or a non-polymeric olefin derivative. The process involves cooling and condensing the effluent gas stream, which comprises an olefin, a paraffin, and a third gas, to produce a liquid condensate and an uncondensed (residual) gas stream. Both streams are then passed through membrane separation steps. The membrane separation of the uncondensed gas stream results in an olefin-enriched stream and an olefin-depleted stream. The olefin-enriched stream is recirculated within the process prior to the condensation step. The membrane separation of the condensate also results in an olefin-enriched stream, which may be recycled for use within the manufacturing operation, and an olefin-depleted stream, which may be purged from the process.


Patent
Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. | Date: 2014-11-11

A membrane separation assembly that includes an integrated filter element and at least one membrane module housed within a first vessel and a second vessel containing at least one membrane module, which is stacked or aligned adjacent to the first vessel. The first vessel is configured to allow liquids to be trapped and removed from the assembly, and gases to flow to and through the membrane modules of the first vessel and the membrane modules of the second vessel, which are ultimately withdrawn from the assembly. The assembly is useful in the conditioning of fuel gas to separate methane from C

Discover hidden collaborations