Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center

Indianapolis, IN, United States

Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center

Indianapolis, IN, United States

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FORT WAYNE, Ind., June 05, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- This year, the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Classic continues to host the largest amateur women’s golf and tennis charity tournament in the country, raising a recording-breaking $1,100,065, which surpasses $1,052,717 raised in 2016.    “The Vera Bradley Foundation’s mission to find an end to breast cancer has truly become a part of our company and community,” says Barbara Bradley Baekgaard, co-founder & Vice President of the Foundation Board of Directors. “Each year, we look at the Classic as a great opportunity to help the Foundation make a substantial contribution to advancing breast cancer research. We are thrilled to have broken our record this year and greatly appreciate everyone who supported this incredible cause.” The Vera Bradley Classic welcomed guests once again to support the Vera Bradley Foundation, as it continued to fundraise for breast cancer research. Five divisions of tennis, four golf tournaments and a celebration dinner were held at three local Fort Wayne clubs on June 3 through June 5. All of the money raised at The Vera Bradley Classic goes to the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Research Laboratories at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center. The Foundation is celebrating its 20th year of funding the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Research Laboratories at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, Indiana. Since 1998, the Foundation has played an integral role in changing the face of breast cancer research by supporting more than 30 labs and more than 35 researchers and clinicians who are leading major advancements in drug therapies and setting a world-wide standard. To date, the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer has raised $28.1 million. The Foundation receives funding through national events, gifts from Vera Bradley (Nasdaq:VRA) and through donations on verabradley.org.


FORT WAYNE, Ind., June 05, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- This year, the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Classic continues to host the largest amateur women’s golf and tennis charity tournament in the country, raising a recording-breaking $1,100,065, which surpasses $1,052,717 raised in 2016.    “The Vera Bradley Foundation’s mission to find an end to breast cancer has truly become a part of our company and community,” says Barbara Bradley Baekgaard, co-founder & Vice President of the Foundation Board of Directors. “Each year, we look at the Classic as a great opportunity to help the Foundation make a substantial contribution to advancing breast cancer research. We are thrilled to have broken our record this year and greatly appreciate everyone who supported this incredible cause.” The Vera Bradley Classic welcomed guests once again to support the Vera Bradley Foundation, as it continued to fundraise for breast cancer research. Five divisions of tennis, four golf tournaments and a celebration dinner were held at three local Fort Wayne clubs on June 3 through June 5. All of the money raised at The Vera Bradley Classic goes to the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Research Laboratories at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center. The Foundation is celebrating its 20th year of funding the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Research Laboratories at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, Indiana. Since 1998, the Foundation has played an integral role in changing the face of breast cancer research by supporting more than 30 labs and more than 35 researchers and clinicians who are leading major advancements in drug therapies and setting a world-wide standard. To date, the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer has raised $28.1 million. The Foundation receives funding through national events, gifts from Vera Bradley (Nasdaq:VRA) and through donations on verabradley.org.


FORT WAYNE, Ind., June 05, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- This year, the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Classic continues to host the largest amateur women’s golf and tennis charity tournament in the country, raising a recording-breaking $1,100,065, which surpasses $1,052,717 raised in 2016.    “The Vera Bradley Foundation’s mission to find an end to breast cancer has truly become a part of our company and community,” says Barbara Bradley Baekgaard, co-founder & Vice President of the Foundation Board of Directors. “Each year, we look at the Classic as a great opportunity to help the Foundation make a substantial contribution to advancing breast cancer research. We are thrilled to have broken our record this year and greatly appreciate everyone who supported this incredible cause.” The Vera Bradley Classic welcomed guests once again to support the Vera Bradley Foundation, as it continued to fundraise for breast cancer research. Five divisions of tennis, four golf tournaments and a celebration dinner were held at three local Fort Wayne clubs on June 3 through June 5. All of the money raised at The Vera Bradley Classic goes to the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Research Laboratories at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center. The Foundation is celebrating its 20th year of funding the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Research Laboratories at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, Indiana. Since 1998, the Foundation has played an integral role in changing the face of breast cancer research by supporting more than 30 labs and more than 35 researchers and clinicians who are leading major advancements in drug therapies and setting a world-wide standard. To date, the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer has raised $28.1 million. The Foundation receives funding through national events, gifts from Vera Bradley (Nasdaq:VRA) and through donations on verabradley.org.


FORT WAYNE, Ind., June 05, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- This year, the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Classic continues to host the largest amateur women’s golf and tennis charity tournament in the country, raising a recording-breaking $1,100,065, which surpasses $1,052,717 raised in 2016.    “The Vera Bradley Foundation’s mission to find an end to breast cancer has truly become a part of our company and community,” says Barbara Bradley Baekgaard, co-founder & Vice President of the Foundation Board of Directors. “Each year, we look at the Classic as a great opportunity to help the Foundation make a substantial contribution to advancing breast cancer research. We are thrilled to have broken our record this year and greatly appreciate everyone who supported this incredible cause.” The Vera Bradley Classic welcomed guests once again to support the Vera Bradley Foundation, as it continued to fundraise for breast cancer research. Five divisions of tennis, four golf tournaments and a celebration dinner were held at three local Fort Wayne clubs on June 3 through June 5. All of the money raised at The Vera Bradley Classic goes to the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Research Laboratories at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center. The Foundation is celebrating its 20th year of funding the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Research Laboratories at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, Indiana. Since 1998, the Foundation has played an integral role in changing the face of breast cancer research by supporting more than 30 labs and more than 35 researchers and clinicians who are leading major advancements in drug therapies and setting a world-wide standard. To date, the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer has raised $28.1 million. The Foundation receives funding through national events, gifts from Vera Bradley (Nasdaq:VRA) and through donations on verabradley.org.


FORT WAYNE, Ind., June 05, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- This year, the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Classic continues to host the largest amateur women’s golf and tennis charity tournament in the country, raising a recording-breaking $1,100,065, which surpasses $1,052,717 raised in 2016.    “The Vera Bradley Foundation’s mission to find an end to breast cancer has truly become a part of our company and community,” says Barbara Bradley Baekgaard, co-founder & Vice President of the Foundation Board of Directors. “Each year, we look at the Classic as a great opportunity to help the Foundation make a substantial contribution to advancing breast cancer research. We are thrilled to have broken our record this year and greatly appreciate everyone who supported this incredible cause.” The Vera Bradley Classic welcomed guests once again to support the Vera Bradley Foundation, as it continued to fundraise for breast cancer research. Five divisions of tennis, four golf tournaments and a celebration dinner were held at three local Fort Wayne clubs on June 3 through June 5. All of the money raised at The Vera Bradley Classic goes to the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Research Laboratories at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center. The Foundation is celebrating its 20th year of funding the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Research Laboratories at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, Indiana. Since 1998, the Foundation has played an integral role in changing the face of breast cancer research by supporting more than 30 labs and more than 35 researchers and clinicians who are leading major advancements in drug therapies and setting a world-wide standard. To date, the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer has raised $28.1 million. The Foundation receives funding through national events, gifts from Vera Bradley (Nasdaq:VRA) and through donations on verabradley.org.


FORT WAYNE, Ind., June 05, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- This year, the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Classic continues to host the largest amateur women’s golf and tennis charity tournament in the country, raising a recording-breaking $1,100,065, which surpasses $1,052,717 raised in 2016.    “The Vera Bradley Foundation’s mission to find an end to breast cancer has truly become a part of our company and community,” says Barbara Bradley Baekgaard, co-founder & Vice President of the Foundation Board of Directors. “Each year, we look at the Classic as a great opportunity to help the Foundation make a substantial contribution to advancing breast cancer research. We are thrilled to have broken our record this year and greatly appreciate everyone who supported this incredible cause.” The Vera Bradley Classic welcomed guests once again to support the Vera Bradley Foundation, as it continued to fundraise for breast cancer research. Five divisions of tennis, four golf tournaments and a celebration dinner were held at three local Fort Wayne clubs on June 3 through June 5. All of the money raised at The Vera Bradley Classic goes to the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Research Laboratories at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center. The Foundation is celebrating its 20th year of funding the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer Research Laboratories at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis, Indiana. Since 1998, the Foundation has played an integral role in changing the face of breast cancer research by supporting more than 30 labs and more than 35 researchers and clinicians who are leading major advancements in drug therapies and setting a world-wide standard. To date, the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer has raised $28.1 million. The Foundation receives funding through national events, gifts from Vera Bradley (Nasdaq:VRA) and through donations on verabradley.org.


News Article | July 11, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

WALTHAM, Mass., PHILADELPHIA and INDIANAPOLIS, July 11 2017 - Syndax Pharmaceuticals, Inc. ("Syndax," the "Company" or "we") (Nasdaq:SNDX), a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing entinostat and SNDX-6352 in multiple cancer indications, in collaboration with The Wistar Institute and Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, today announced the publication of a preclinical report demonstrating that entinostat, Syndax's oral, Class-I histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances the antitumor effect of PD-1 (programmed death receptor-1) blockade through the inhibition of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The article, titled "Entinostat Neutralizes Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells and Enhances the Antitumor Effect of PD-1 Inhibition in Murine Models of Lung and Renal Cell Carcinoma," was published in Clinical Cancer Research and is available online. Researchers tested the effect of combining entinostat with an anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody that enhances the T cell-mediated antitumor immune response. The studies were conducted in two mouse models of renal cell carcinoma and lung cancer and included a series of in vitro experiments aimed at characterizing the effects of this combined treatment on the myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a highly immunosuppressive population of tumor infiltrating immature myeloid cells. The results indicated that entinostat has an inhibitory effect on MDSC immunosuppressive function both in vivo and in vitro, which results in enhanced anti-tumor activity of the combination. "The use of PD-1 inhibitors in the treatment of solid tumors has demonstrated significant benefit, but many patients still present with progressive disease following treatment," said co-lead researcher Dmitry I. Gabrilovich, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Program Leader, Translational Tumor Immunology Program, The Wistar Institute. "We have previously demonstrated the role of MDSCs as important mediators of resistance to immune therapy approaches. The results from our new study suggest that entinostat may enhance the anti-tumor efficacy of PD-1 targeted therapy through MDSC targeting, potentially providing an effective combination treatment approach for patients with solid tumors, including lung and renal cell carcinoma." "Our group has previously reported that entinostat enhances the antitumor effect of high dose interleukin 2 in renal cell carcinoma both in mice and patients. These new findings confirm that the combination of entinostat with immunotherapy has significant immunomodulatory activity and may offer increased benefit for a larger population of patients with renal cell carcinoma, non-small cell lung cancer and other solid tumors with an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment," said co-lead researcher Roberto Pili, M.D., Robert Wallace Miller Professor of Oncology and Professor of Medicine and Urology at IU Simon Cancer Center. "We are pleased to have obtained the same results in two different laboratories and we look forward to translating these preclinical findings into combination approaches with entinostat to enhance the clinical activity of immune checkpoint inhibition." "We are excited that these current data support and extend initial observations generated at Johns Hopkins," said Peter Ordentlich, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer of Syndax. "Entinostat has now been shown to impact MDSCs in multiple preclinical tumor models across several laboratories as well as from blood samples taken from entinostat treated patients. These data collectively provide strong rationale for combining entinostat with immunotherapies for the treatment of solid tumors. We look forward to providing additional updates from the entinostat clinical development program." Syndax is a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company developing an innovative pipeline of cancer therapies. Our lead product candidate, entinostat, which was granted Breakthrough Therapy designation by the FDA following positive results from our Phase 2b clinical trial, ENCORE 301, is currently being evaluated in a Phase 3 clinical trial for advanced hormone receptor positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative breast cancer. Given its potential ability to block the function of immune suppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment, entinostat is also being evaluated in combination with approved PD-1 antagonists. Ongoing Phase 1b/2 clinical trials combine entinostat with KEYTRUDA® from Merck & Co., Inc. for non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma and colorectal cancer; with TECENTRIQ® from Genentech, Inc. for triple negative breast cancer; and with BAVENCIO® from Pfizer Inc. and Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, for ovarian cancer. Our second product candidate, SNDX-6352, is a monoclonal antibody that blocks the CSF-1 receptor and may also block the function of immune suppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment. SNDX-6352 is being evaluated in a single ascending dose Phase 1 clinical trial and is expected to be developed to treat a variety of cancers. This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Words such as "may," "will," "expect," "plan," "anticipate," "estimate," "intend," "believe" and similar expressions (as well as other words or expressions referencing future events, conditions or circumstances) are intended to identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are based on Syndax's expectations and assumptions as of the date of this press release. Each of these forward-looking statements involves risks and uncertainties. Actual results may differ materially from these forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements contained in this press release include, but are not limited to, statements about the progress, timing, clinical development and scope of clinical trials and the reporting of clinical data for Syndax's product candidates, and the potential use of our product candidates to treat various cancer indications. Many factors may cause differences between current expectations and actual results including unexpected safety or efficacy data observed during preclinical or clinical studies, clinical trial site activation or enrollment rates that are lower than expected, changes in expected or existing competition, changes in the regulatory environment, failure of Syndax's collaborators to support or advance collaborations or product candidates and unexpected litigation or other disputes. Other factors that may cause Syndax's actual results to differ from those expressed or implied in the forward-looking statements in this press release are discussed in Syndax's filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, including the "Risk Factors" sections contained therein. Except as required by law, Syndax assumes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements contained herein to reflect any change in expectations, even as new information becomes available. The Wistar Institute is an international leader in biomedical research with special expertise in cancer research and vaccine development. Founded in 1892 as the first independent nonprofit biomedical research institute in the country, Wistar has held the prestigious Cancer Center designation from the National Cancer Institute since 1972. The Institute works actively to ensure that research advances move from the laboratory to the clinic as quickly as possible. wistar.org. The Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center is the only National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center in Indiana that provides patient care. The NCI designation recognizes that its collaborative research programs meet the NCI's rigorous criteria for world-class, state-of-the-art programs in multidisciplinary cancer research. The mission of the IU Simon Cancer Center is to eliminate cancer's burden in Indiana and beyond. Cancer.iu.edu.


BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Medical researchers at Indiana University Bloomington have found evidence for a link between prostate cancer, which affects millions of men age 50 and older, and Ewing's sarcoma, a rare form of cancer that affects children and young adults. The results of the study, reported today in the journal Cell Reports, suggest that the molecular mechanism that triggers the rare disease Ewing's sarcoma could act as a potential new direction for the treatment of more than half of patients with prostate cancer. A form of bone and soft tissue cancer that affects about one in 1 million children and young adults age 10 to 19, Ewing's sarcoma is terminal in 44 percent of teens age 15 to 19 and 30 percent of children. Over 100,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year in the U.S, with more than 99 percent of cases occurring after age 50. "This research shows that the molecular mechanism involved in the development of most prostate cancers is very similar to the molecular mechanism known to cause Ewing's sarcoma," said Peter Hollenhorst, an associate professor in the medical sciences program at IU Bloomington, a part of the IU School of Medicine. "It also suggests that this mechanism might be used to explore a common treatment for both diseases, one of which is not often pursued by drug companies due to its rarity." Hollenhorst is also a member of the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis. Other authors on the paper include Vivekananda Kedage, a graduate student in the IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, and Travis J. Jerde, an associate professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the IU School of Medicine in Indianapolis. Kedage is the first author on the study. There are 28 genes in the human body known as ETS genes, four of which are known to produce proteins that cause prostate cancer. These four cancer-causing genes, or "oncogenes," are called ETV1, ETV4, ETV5 and ERG, the last of which has been implicated in over 50 percent of all prostate cancers. The other three combined play a role in about 7 percent of prostate cancers. Ewing's sarcoma results from errors in the chromosome repair process that causes the merger of two separate gene segments into a mutant hybrid gene, also known as a chimeric or fusion gene. One of these genes is called EWS, the other is a gene that produces ETS proteins. Hollenhorst's study is the first to show that the proteins produced by the EWS gene interact with all four ETS proteins known to trigger prostate cancer. Moreover, the EWS protein only interacts with proteins from these four harmful ETS genes, not the other 24 ETS genes not found to play a role in prostate cancer. "A molecular mechanism that sets these four genes apart from the ones that don't trigger cancer has never been identified until now," Hollenhorst said. "This is significant because it suggests that any compound that disrupts EWS-ETS interaction would specifically inhibit the function of the four oncogenes and not the others, which play important roles in the healthy function of the body." The team also found the ETS genes implicated in prostate cancer interact with the un-mutated form of the EWS gene. In Ewing's sarcoma, the small blue tumors that characterize the disease do not occur unless mutation occurs. IU scientists used a combination of laboratory experiments and mouse models to observe the interaction of EWS and ETS proteins in prostate cells. The majority of the experiments involved observing the behavior of ETS oncogenes in prostate cancer cell cultures to reveal interaction with EWS proteins. In experiments at the IU School of Medicine, they also introduced the ERG gene into normal human prostate cells in mice, which triggered the formation of tumors. The scientists then introduced an artificial mutation in the ERG gene to disrupt interaction with the proteins produced by the EWS gene. In these mice, the tumors failed to form. "Together, the results indicated that the interaction between ERG and EWS is important for tumor formation," Hollenhorst said. "We chose to focus our greatest efforts on the ERG protein since it is responsible for over 50 percent of all prostate cancers, and therefore the potential to benefit the greatest number of people." Based upon the strength of the work reported in the study, Hollenhorst and colleagues at IU Bloomington and the IU School of Medicine have received a grant from the IU Simon Cancer Center to search for molecules that could potentially disrupt ETS-EWS interaction. Their work will be conducted in collaboration with a facility at Purdue University that specializes in screening for these molecules. Additional authors on the paper are Nagarathinam Selvaraj, postdoctoral researcher, and Justin A. Budka, graduate student, in the medical sciences program at IU Bloomington; and Joshua P. Plotnik and Taylor R. Nicholas, graduate students in the IU Bloomington College of Arts and Sciences' Department of Biology. This research was supported in part by the American Cancer Society.


INDIANAPOLIS -- More than 13 million older adults are admitted to hospitals annually in the United States. Nearly a quarter need to have all decisions made for them by a family member, and almost half need help from family to make some decisions. Clinician-researchers from the Indiana University Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute have developed a tool to measure the communication experiences of family members of hospitalized patients. "Good, timely communication with family members is essential for good decision-making, and difficulty in communication adds stress to an already stressful situation," said IU Center for Aging Research and Regenstrief Institute scientist Alexia Torke, MD, an expert on surrogate decision-making, who led the development and validation of the new tool. "Our survey tool is unique in that it measures communication in all settings of the hospital and accounts for the fact that family members often encounter multiple clinicians during the patient's hospital stay." "Patients exist in the context of their family, yet in the hospital setting, surrogate decision-makers and other family members too often are disregarded. But they should be part of the health care team and process -- part of whole patient care. Medical teams and entire health care systems need to increasingly value communication with family members as they pursue quality of care goals." Dr. Torke also holds appointments with IU School of Medicine, the IU Health Charles Warren Fairbanks Center for Medical Ethics and the Daniel F. Evans Center for Spiritual and Religious Values in Healthcare. A new study published online ahead of print in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management has validated and confirmed the reliability of the Family Inpatient Communication Survey. The easy to administer, practical IU Center for Aging Research tool comprises 30 questions that probe the communication experiences of family members of hospitalized patients. The survey focuses on two dimensions of communication by the medical staff--conveyance of information and emotional support. Dr. Torke and colleagues were aware from their previous work that family members desire frequent updates from the medical team. So the survey tool asks family members to indicate if they believed that hospital staff members communicated with them as often as they would have liked. The survey asks if family members had to struggle to acquire information from the staff. It also queries whether they felt they had received adequate emotional support from the hospital staff. In the validation and reliability study, conducted with 350 family members of IU Health Methodist Hospital, IU Health West Hospital and Eskenazi Health inpatients, the vast majority of family members reported good communication experiences. Approximately 83 percent indicated that hospital staff members adequately communicated with family members and 93 percent indicated that they felt that the hospital listed to them. Only six percent desired more emotional support than they received. "These positive responses indicate that most family members are very satisfied with communication, but the survey does allow us to identify individuals who have had a bad experience," said Dr. Torke. "In the future, the survey can help us target interventions to improve communication in the hospital." The survey, which for this study was conducted via phone interviews by research assistants, took about five minutes for each family member to complete. In addition to Dr. Torke, authors of "Validation of the Family Inpatient Communication Survey" are Patrick Monahan, PhD, of the IU School of Medicine; Christopher M. Callahan of the IU Center for Aging Research, Regenstrief Institute and IU School of Medicine; Paul R. Helft, MD, of IU Health and the IU Health Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center; Greg A. Sachs, IU Center for Aging Research, Regenstrief Institute and IU School of Medicine; Lucia D. Wocial, PhD, RN, of IU Health; James E. Slaven, MS, of IU School of Medicine; Kianna Montz, MA, Lev Inger, BS and Emily Burke, BS, of the IU Center for Aging Research and Regenstrief Institute. The development of the study was funded by the Research in Palliative and End-of-Life Communication and Training (RESPECT) Center of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and the National Institute on Aging (R01 AG044408). The survey is downloadable from the IU Center for Aging Research website, which also contains licensing information.


News Article | December 19, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Bottom Line: Among women with breast cancer who received a type of chemotherapy called an anthracycline, those who had a certain genetic biomarker had a significantly increased risk for having anthracycline-induced congestive heart failure. Journal in Which the Study was Published: Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Author: Bryan P. Schneider, MD, associate professor of medicine at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis. Background: Schneider explained that the decision to undergo chemotherapy for breast cancer is not always clear cut because each patient has a different risk of relapse and different tolerance to potential adverse effects of treatment. As a result, the more information a patient and his or her oncologist have about the potential risks and benefits of treatment the better prepared they are to make good treatment decisions, he noted. "Anthracyclines such as doxorubicin, which are widely used chemotherapeutic agents, cause congestive heart failure in about 1 to 2 percent of patients," continued Schneider. "Knowing which patients are at increased risk for this life-threatening effect of anthracycline chemotherapy is important to help oncologists counsel patients about their personal risks and benefits of such treatment." How the Study Was Conducted and Results: Schneider and colleagues analyzed genome-wide association data from 3,431 women with breast cancer who received doxorubicin as part of treatment received through enrollment in the phase III Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) 5103 clinical trial and for whom heart assessment data were available. Among these patients, 68 (2 percent) had cardiologist-adjudicated congestive heart failure. Because the majority of those who had cardiologist-adjudicated congestive heart failure (51) were European-American, the researchers limited the genetic association analysis to European-Americans. They identified several SNPs associated with risk of anthracycline-induced congestive heart failure. After looking at the chromosomal location of the SNPs, the researchers chose two of the top SNPs for validation in independent data sets. One of the two SNPs, rs28714259 was associated with risk of anthracycline-induced congestive heart failure among 2,415 women with breast cancer who received doxorubicin as part of treatment received through enrollment in the phase III ECOG 1199 clinical trial. It was also associated with low ventricular ejection fraction, which is a sign of heart damage, among 828 women with breast cancer who received doxorubicin as part of treatment through enrollment in the phase III BEATRICE clinical trial. Author Comment: "We found that the A allele of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs28714259 was associated with increased risk of anthracycline-induced congestive heart failure among women with breast cancer," said Schneider. "Adding information gained from testing for this SNP to currently used clinical information could help oncologists provide a more precise prediction of the risks and benefits of anthracycline chemotherapy for patients with breast cancer. We are currently further testing this finding in patients receiving anthracyclines at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center to better understand its contribution to heart failure risk in the face of other known risk factors and comorbidities." Limitations: According to Schneider, the study has two main limitations. First, not all of the clinical trials used the same method for assessing heart damage with corresponding long-term data. Second, the number of patients who had heart damage was relatively low because it is a rare adverse event. "As a result, additional studies in other patient groups and in the real-world setting of the clinic, as we are doing, are needed to confirm the association," Schneider said. Funding & Disclosures: The study was conducted by the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group [ACRIN (American College of Radiology Imaging Network)] and supported by funds from the Public Health Service, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, the Conquer Cancer Foundation, the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, the National Cancer Institute, the National Institutes of Health, and the Department of Health and Human Services. Schneider declares no conflicts of interest. To interview Bryan P. Schneider, contact Julia Gunther at julia.gunther@aacr.org or 215-446-6896. About the American Association for Cancer Research Founded in 1907, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) is the world's first and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research and its mission to prevent and cure cancer. AACR membership includes more than 37,000 laboratory, translational, and clinical researchers; population scientists; other health care professionals; and patient advocates residing in 108 countries. The AACR marshals the full spectrum of expertise of the cancer community to accelerate progress in the prevention, biology, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer by annually convening more than 30 conferences and educational workshops, the largest of which is the AACR Annual Meeting with nearly 19,500 attendees. In addition, the AACR publishes eight prestigious, peer-reviewed scientific journals and a magazine for cancer survivors, patients, and their caregivers. The AACR funds meritorious research directly as well as in cooperation with numerous cancer organizations. As the Scientific Partner of Stand Up To Cancer, the AACR provides expert peer review, grants administration, and scientific oversight of team science and individual investigator grants in cancer research that have the potential for near-term patient benefit. The AACR actively communicates with legislators and other policymakers about the value of cancer research and related biomedical science in saving lives from cancer. For more information about the AACR, visit http://www. .

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