Mellon Institute

Pittsburgh, PA, United States

Mellon Institute

Pittsburgh, PA, United States
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Berdyyeva T.K.,Mellon Institute | Berdyyeva T.K.,Carnegie Mellon University | Olson C.R.,Mellon Institute | Olson C.R.,Carnegie Mellon University
Journal of Neurophysiology | Year: 2014

Neurons in the supplementary eye field (SEF) of the macaque monkey exhibit rank selectivity, firing differentially as a function of the phase attained during the performance of a task requiring the execution of saccades to a series of objects in fixed order. The activity of these neurons is commonly thought to represent ordinal position in the service of serial-order performance. However, there is little evidence causally linking neuronal activity in the SEF to sequential behavior. To explore the role of the SEF in serial-order performance, we delivered intracortical microstimulation while monkeys performed a task requiring them to make saccades to three objects in a fixed order on each trial. Microstimulation, considered on average across all SEF sites and all phases of the trial, affected saccadic kinematics. In particular, it prolonged the reaction time, increased the peak velocity, and slightly increased the amplitude of saccades. In addition, it interfered with the monkeys' ability to select the target appropriate to a given phase of the trial. The pattern of the errors was such as would be expected if microstimulation shifted the neural representation of ordinal position toward a later phase of the trial. © 2014 the American Physiological Society.


Berdyyeva T.K.,Mellon Institute | Berdyyeva T.K.,Carnegie Mellon University | Olson C.R.,Mellon Institute | Olson C.R.,Carnegie Mellon University
Journal of Neurophysiology | Year: 2010

Neurons in several areas of monkey frontal cortex exhibit ordinal position (rank) selectivity during the performance of serial order tasks. It has been unclear whether rank selectivity or the dependence of rank selectivity on task context varies across the areas of frontal cortex. To resolve this issue, we recorded from neurons in the supplementary motor area (SMA), presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA), supplementary eye field (SEF), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) as monkeys performed two oculomotor tasks, one requiring the selection of three actions in sequence and the other requiring the selection of three objects in sequence. We found that neurons representing all ranks were present in all areas. Only to a moderate degree did the prevalence and nature of rank selectivity vary from area to area. The two most prominent inter-area differences involved a lower prevalence of rank selectivity in the dlPFC than in the other areas and a higher proportion of neurons preferring late ranks in the SMA and SEF than in the other areas. Neurons in all four areas are rank generalists in the sense of favoring the same rank in both the serial action task and the serial object task. Copyright © 2010 The American Physiological Society.


PubMed | Mellon Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Applied optics | Year: 2010

A simple flash photolysis lamp has been described. This lamp has output in the vacuum uv region down to LiF cutoff and has been used successfully in the photodecomposition of ethane. The output intensity was measured below 1650 A using carbon dioxide as an actinometer and was found to be 7.2 x 10(16) quanta/flash or 1.31 x 10(21) quanta/sec. This intensity is about a factor of 10(6)-10(7) higher than that of the low intensity vacuum uv lamp normally used in the continuous photolysis technique.


PubMed | Mellon Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Applied optics | Year: 2010

A description is given of an ir spectrometer capable of scanning the region 2-15 micro in 10 microsec at a repetition rate of 20,000 scans/sec. The application of the instrument to problems in kinetic spectroscopy is demonstrated by the flash photolysis of CF(3)I: Ar mixtures and the subsequent detection of transient absorption at 1250 cm(-1) due to the gaseous CF(3) radical.


News Article | November 14, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Today Desktop Alert Inc. the 2016 Government Security News 1st Place Winner for America’s Homeland Security Airport, Seaport and Border Security mass notification requirements announced that the company has acquired Metis Secure Solutions. “Mircom is confident that the integration between Metis and Desktop Alert will position the platform for greater expansion in its market segment and increase customer reach in a shorter period of time, simultaneously facilitating enhancements to both platforms. As part of the acquisition, Desktop Alert Inc. has assumed existing customer relationships and Metis projects and will continue supporting the Metis solutions and product portfolio,” said Mark Falbo, President Mircom Group of Companies. Metis Secure delivers software and hardware products that help you protect your people, facilities, and assets when an emergency strikes. "With poor cell phone and radio reception throughout and numerous research laboratories containing hazardous materials, Mellon Institute is a challenging security environment. If this technology can work here, it can work anywhere," Madelyn Miller Director of Environmental Health and Safety Carnegie Mellon University “We are pleased with the addition of Metis Secures’ Solutions to our portfolio of mass notification products and services. Metis Secures’ technology insures less than 10 second alerting to all emergency command centers. When lives are at stake, seconds count. Common area alerting for personal safety requires instant two way LIVE voice capability. It is a must. Beacon alert technology with limited LED text message screens and text-to-speech speakers without bi-directional real-time voice is limited in an active emergency. Reading an alert is one thing, communicating by voice during an active emergency is a must. Our family of alerting systems now provides this fabulous common area alerting end-point solution,” said Howard Ryan, Founder Desktop Alert Inc. Desktop Alert is a leading provider of enterprise mass notification and emergency communications to the United States Department of Defense, federal government and First-Responders around the world. Its innovative and patented software has been internationally recognized as a “Best Mass Notification” and “Best First Responder Interoperable Communications” system. Desktop Alert provides a suite of scalable, flexible, and adaptable communication, collaboration, and situational awareness tools in environments ranging from austere - no terrestrial infrastructure support - to fully modern with extensive IP and legacy system integrations. Desktop Alert optimizes the communications flow with timely, accurate information to ensure effective decision making, coordination, proactive community engagement, and public awareness. A full array of the Desktop Alert products and services are available at http://www.AlertUsNow.Net

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