Boston, MA, United States
Boston, MA, United States

Time filter

Source Type

The global immunohistochemistry (IHC) market is estimated to reach a value of USD 3.1 billion by 2025 The rising prevalence of cancer and increasing healthcare expenses driven by expanding aging population base are recognized to be the most influential factors driving the growth of the immunohistochemistry market. Furthermore, the rapid growth of biotech industry highlighted by increase in growth and revenue coupled with increase in stock market capitalization will nurture the growth. Cancer has high morbidity and mortality risk associated with them. The diagnosis of the disease is majorly dependent on the stage of the disease at admission. This has led to the high demand of immunohistochemistry products. IHC staining process is performed on cancer tissues to reveal the presence of HER2 receptors and/or hormone receptors on their surface. This information plays a vital role in planning the treatment for the disease, creating a demand for immunohistochemistry products. In addition, the rising popularity of targeted immunotherapy and biologic therapy for anticancer drug development and the increasing approvals of the same by the FDA to treat specific types of cancer are expected to benefit the growth in the long run. Other important factors driving growth include the alarming rise in healthcare spending and the shift in focus on value-based healthcare solutions. In 2015, the U.S. healthcare spending witnessed an increase of 5.8% to reach a value of USD 3.2 trillion. To curb the issue and establish a more value-based healthcare delivery, hospitals and care facilities are adopting a more specific and targeted therapy for better outcomes. Key Topics Covered: 1. Methodology and Scope 2. Executive Summary 3. Immunohistochemistry Market Variables, Trends & Scope 3.1. Market Segmentation & Scope 3.2. Immunohistochemistry: Market Dynamics 3.2.1. Market driver analysis 3.2.2. Market restraint analysis 3.3. Key Opportunities Prioritized 3.3.1. Key opportunities prioritized, by product 3.3.2. Key opportunities prioritized, by application 3.3.3. Key opportunities prioritized, by end-use 3.4. Immunohistochemistry - SWOT Analysis, By Factor (Political & legal, economic and technological) 4. Immunohistochemistry: Product Estimates & Trend Analysis 4.1. Immunohistochemistry Market: Product Movement Analysis 4.2. Antibodies 4.2.2. Primary Antibodies 4.2.3. Secondary Antibodies 4.3. Reagents 4.3.2. Histological Stains 4.3.3. Blocking Sera and Reagents 4.3.4. Chromogenic Substrates  4.3.5. Fixation Reagents 4.3.6. Stabilizers 4.3.7. Organic Solvents 4.3.8. Proteolytic Enzymes 4.3.9. Diluents 4.4. Equipment 4.4.2. Slide Staining Systems 4.4.3. Tissue Microarrays 4.4.4. Tissue Processing Systems 4.4.5. Slide Scanners 4.4.6. Others 4.5. Kits 5. Immunohistochemistry: Application Estimates & Trend Analysis 5.1. Immunohistochemistry Market: Application Movement Analysis 5.2. Diagnostics 5.2.2. Cancer 5.2.3. Infectious Diseases 5.2.4. Cardiovascular diseases 5.2.5. Autoimmune Diseases 5.2.6. Diabetes Mellitus 5.2.7. Nephrological Diseases 5.3. Drug Testing  6. Immunohistochemistry: End-Use Estimates & Trend Analysis 6.1. Immunohistochemistry Market: Application Movement Analysis 6.2. Hospitals and Diagnostic Laboratories 6.3. Research Institutes 6.4. Others 7. Immunohistochemistry: Regional Estimates & Trend Analysis, by Product, Application, and End-use 8. Competitive Landscape For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/gkgmnp/immunohistochemist Research and Markets Laura Wood, Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call +1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call +1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907 Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716 To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/31-billion-immunohistochemistry-ihc-market-analysis-and-forecast-segments-2014-2025-by-product-application--end-uses---research-and-markets-300455123.html


Successfully won the tender through bidding in four China provinces and products are to be rolled out gradually HONG KONG, CHINA--(Marketwired - May 14, 2017) - The United Laboratories International Holdings Limited ("TUL", the "Company" or the "Group") ( : 3933), participated the "Basal Insulin Clinical Application Summit" in Zhuhai, the PRC, hosted by Chinese Journal of Diabetes Mellitus, together with a launching ceremony for the nationwide roll out of "United Laboratories USLEN". Hundreds of well-known experts and clinical doctors in the field of diabetes attended the summit while guest speakers are invited for themed presentation and academic exchange regarding the usage of basal insulin in China. This summit marked the official roll out of "United Laboratories USLEN" insulin glargin and a new era of TUL's development, endeavouring to improve the treatment of diabetes in China. TUL has been committed to research and development of medication for diabetes treatment. In early 2017, the Group gained the production approval for "United Laboratories USLEN" insulin glargin injection for the specification of refilled pen-type as well as the specification of disposable pen-type from China State Food and Drug Administration ("SFDA"). "United Laboratories USLEN" injection is developed and produced with international advanced purification technology and production facilities. The quality of product is in full compliance with the US Pharmacopoeia standards, while its efficacy and safety are comparable with the original research product. Regarding the usage, the fillings and injection pen are connected in the same injection device for the disposable pen-type, which is convenient to carry and use; while the refilled pen-type should be combined with the "United Lab Pen" (insulin injection pen) which can be reused. Patients can choose from insulin products with different specifications depends on their circumstances. Currently, "United Laboratories USLEN" has won the tender through bidding in Fujian, Chongqing, Heilongjiang and Henan provinces and the Group will actively continue to participate in the bidding in other provinces. The product will start to be manufactured and be rolled out this month. It is expected insulin glargin will be the lead of insulin analogues product series and accelerate the Group's development, boosting its sales and profitability. Mr. Tsoi Hoi Shan, Chairman of TUL, said, "Insulin product series will continue to be the Group's key strategic specification. We are delighted that the launch of insulin glargine gained extensive recognition in the market. In the future, the Group will keep on investing in research and development capability enhancement and develop more new products, aiming to provide the best medical treatment to patients, hence bringing better returns to the Group and its shareholders." Company Information Listed on the Stock Exchange of Hong Kong in June 2007, TUL is one of the leading pharmaceutical companies in China, principally engaged in the manufacturing and selling of medicines, and the bulk and intermediate products used to produce finished goods. Up to now, the Group has a total of 188 products qualified to produce in the PRC and/or Hong Kong based on the Drug Registration Approvals in the PRC and Certificates of Drug or Product Registration in Hong Kong, 84 were in production. The Group has 49 finished products listed in National Insurance Catalogue and 26 are in the list of the National Essential Drug List. The Group is currently a component of the Hang Seng Composite Index Series.


In Dodson's most recent role, she led the alignment of Medical Affairs practices, policies and standards across the globe – including the launch of global systems to manage Medical Communications, Publications and Investigator Sponsored Research (ISR). During her time at Astellas, she has also expanded the Health Economics & Outcomes Research function and pioneered multiple, innovative real world data projects and research partnerships with leading managed care and academic organizations. In her new role, Dodson will report directly to Kremer and assume overall responsibility for the strategic direction of the Medical Affairs Americas organization, including continued medical support of in-line products, late-stage development compounds and ongoing business evolution across the region. Dodson has extensive clinical and research experience in the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries. After starting her career in direct patient care at the Department of Veterans Affairs, Dodson spent more than a decade at Pfizer in various Medical Affairs leadership roles spanning the urology and respiratory franchises. Following her work with Pfizer, Dodson then served as vice president of Medical Affairs at GTx, Inc., where she led a Phase 3 clinical development study of a selective androgen receptor modulator for the prevention and treatment of muscle wasting in patients with cancer. She also incorporated key economic and health outcomes assessments to support product utilization and valuation. Dodson has received multiple awards for leadership and innovation throughout her career, including the National Healthcare Business Women's Association Rising Star and the Astellas Vision Award. She earned a doctorate of pharmacy degree from Mercer University School of Pharmacy and completed a postdoctoral residency at the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. About Astellas Pharma Inc. Astellas Pharma Inc., co-headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, and Northbrook, Ill., is a pharmaceutical company dedicated to improving the health of people around the world through the provision of innovative and reliable pharmaceuticals. Astellas has approximately 18,000 employees worldwide. The organization is committed to becoming a global category leader in Urology, Immunology (including Transplantation) and Infectious diseases, Oncology, Neuroscience and Diabetes Mellitus (DM) Complications and Kidney diseases. For more information on Astellas Pharma Inc., please visit the company website at www.astellas.com/en. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/astellas-names-shontelle-dodson-senior-vice-president-and-head-of-medical-affairs-americas-300455329.html


Dublin, May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Frontier Pharma: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus - GPCRs and Protein Kinases Dominate Pipeline, with Most Promising First-in-Class Targets Demonstrating Potential Disease-Modifying Effects" drug pipelines to their offering. The increasing demand for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) therapeutics, caused by rising prevalence of the disease, has resulted in a large and competitive market landscape. There are a number of drugs competing for different market segments, across multiple lines of therapy, according to a business intelligence provider. The company's latest report states that the emergence over the past decade of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors and sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors has intensified competition. These new drug classes have been highly commercially successful and are now well established within the T2DM treatment algorithm. The leading products within these drug classes are Novo Nordisk's Victoza, Merck's Januvia, and Janssen's Invokana, respectively. In 2015, these drugs generated $2.7 billion, $4.3 billion, and $1.6 billion, respectively. Fiona Chisholm, Analyst, notes: In spite of recent developments, there are still significant unmet needs for T2DM. Treatment regimens are often complex, and many drugs have limited long-term efficacy and side effects that are particularly undesirable for the T2DM patient population, such as increased cardiovascular risk factors or weight gain. Alongside the rapidly expanding prevalence population, this ensures that sustained investment in T2DM product innovation continues to be an attractive commercial prospect. Indeed, with 591 products in development, T2DM pipeline activity is very high in comparison to other related indications within metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 1 diabetes mellitus, which have 254 and 244 active products in development, respectively. T2DM therapeutics can often attract high values in licensing or co-development strategic consolidations. GBI Research's analysis of licensing and co-development deals relating to T2DM therapeutics since 2006 has identified aggregate deal values of $9.2 billion and $9.5 billion, respectively, for deals with disclosed deal values. Despite this, the majority of first-in-class products in development for T2DM have no disclosed involvement in previous licensing or co-development. Among these products, the range of molecular targets is relatively wide, providing ample and diverse opportunities for potential investors. Entering into a licensing or co-development deal can have significant benefits for both parties, including shared product development risks, financial and R&D resource support, and portfolio or geographical expansion,"" Chisholm concludes Key Topics Covered: 1 Tables & Figures 2 Executive Summary 2.1 Large and Competitive Market Landscape Driven by Rising Prevalence 2.2 Investment in First-in-Class Innovation Remains Strong 2.3 Opportunities for Investment in First-in-Class Product Development are Considerable 3 The Case for Innovation 3.1 Growing Opportunities for Biologic Products 3.2 Diversification of Molecular Targets 3.3 Innovative First-in-Class Product Development Remains Attractive 3.4 Regulatory and Reimbursement Policy Shifts Favor First-in-Class Product Innovation 3.5 Sustained Innovation 3.6 GBI Research Report Guidance 4 Clinical and Commercial Landscape 4.1 Disease Overview 4.2 Classification of Diabetes Mellitus 4.3 Symptoms 4.4 Epidemiology 4.5 Etiology 4.6 Pathophysiology 4.7 Co-morbidities and Complications 4.8 Management and Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus 4.8.1 Non-insulin T2DM Therapies 4.9 Insulin-Based T2DM Therapies 4.10 Overview of Marketed Products in Type 2 Diabetes 4.11 Unmet Need and Commercial Opportunities in T2DM 5 Assessment of Pipeline Product Innovation 5.1 Pipeline by Stage of Development, Molecule Type and Molecular Target 5.2 Comparative Distribution of Programs between the Market and Pipeline by Molecular Target Class 5.3 First-in-Class Programs by Molecular Target Category 6 Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Signaling Network, Disease Causation and Innovation Alignment 6.1 Complexity of Signaling Networks 6.2 Signaling Pathways and First-in-Class Molecular Target Integration 6.3 First-in-Class Matrix Assessment 7 First-in-Class Target and Pipeline Program Evaluation 7.1 Pipeline Programs Targeting Insulin Receptor Substrate 1 and Insulin Receptor Substrate 7.2 Pipeline Programs Targeting G-Protein Coupled Receptor Kinase 5 (GRK5) 7.3 Pipeline Programs Targeting Type 2 Angiotensin II Receptor 7.4 Pipeline Programs Targeting Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (IAPP) 7.5 Pipeline Programs Targeting Nacht LRR and PYD Domains Containing Protein 7.6 Pipeline Programs Targeting Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma Coactivator 1 Alpha (PPARGC1A) 7.7 Pipeline Programs Targeting Glucagon 7.8 Pipeline Programs Targeting Alpha Synuclein 7.9 Pipeline Programs Targeting Microtubule Associated Protein Tau 8 Strategic Consolidations 8.1 Industry-Wide First-in-Class Deals 8.2 Licensing Deals 8.3 Co-development Deals 8.4 First-in-Class Programs Not Involved in Licensing or Co-development Deals 9 Appendix For more information about this drug pipelines report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/ql886r/frontier_pharma


Dublin, May 11, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Frontier Pharma: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus - GPCRs and Protein Kinases Dominate Pipeline, with Most Promising First-in-Class Targets Demonstrating Potential Disease-Modifying Effects" drug pipelines to their offering. The increasing demand for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) therapeutics, caused by rising prevalence of the disease, has resulted in a large and competitive market landscape. There are a number of drugs competing for different market segments, across multiple lines of therapy, according to a business intelligence provider. The company's latest report states that the emergence over the past decade of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors and sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors has intensified competition. These new drug classes have been highly commercially successful and are now well established within the T2DM treatment algorithm. The leading products within these drug classes are Novo Nordisk's Victoza, Merck's Januvia, and Janssen's Invokana, respectively. In 2015, these drugs generated $2.7 billion, $4.3 billion, and $1.6 billion, respectively. Fiona Chisholm, Analyst, notes: In spite of recent developments, there are still significant unmet needs for T2DM. Treatment regimens are often complex, and many drugs have limited long-term efficacy and side effects that are particularly undesirable for the T2DM patient population, such as increased cardiovascular risk factors or weight gain. Alongside the rapidly expanding prevalence population, this ensures that sustained investment in T2DM product innovation continues to be an attractive commercial prospect. Indeed, with 591 products in development, T2DM pipeline activity is very high in comparison to other related indications within metabolic disorders such as obesity and type 1 diabetes mellitus, which have 254 and 244 active products in development, respectively. T2DM therapeutics can often attract high values in licensing or co-development strategic consolidations. GBI Research's analysis of licensing and co-development deals relating to T2DM therapeutics since 2006 has identified aggregate deal values of $9.2 billion and $9.5 billion, respectively, for deals with disclosed deal values. Despite this, the majority of first-in-class products in development for T2DM have no disclosed involvement in previous licensing or co-development. Among these products, the range of molecular targets is relatively wide, providing ample and diverse opportunities for potential investors. Entering into a licensing or co-development deal can have significant benefits for both parties, including shared product development risks, financial and R&D resource support, and portfolio or geographical expansion,"" Chisholm concludes Key Topics Covered: 1 Tables & Figures 2 Executive Summary 2.1 Large and Competitive Market Landscape Driven by Rising Prevalence 2.2 Investment in First-in-Class Innovation Remains Strong 2.3 Opportunities for Investment in First-in-Class Product Development are Considerable 3 The Case for Innovation 3.1 Growing Opportunities for Biologic Products 3.2 Diversification of Molecular Targets 3.3 Innovative First-in-Class Product Development Remains Attractive 3.4 Regulatory and Reimbursement Policy Shifts Favor First-in-Class Product Innovation 3.5 Sustained Innovation 3.6 GBI Research Report Guidance 4 Clinical and Commercial Landscape 4.1 Disease Overview 4.2 Classification of Diabetes Mellitus 4.3 Symptoms 4.4 Epidemiology 4.5 Etiology 4.6 Pathophysiology 4.7 Co-morbidities and Complications 4.8 Management and Treatment of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus 4.8.1 Non-insulin T2DM Therapies 4.9 Insulin-Based T2DM Therapies 4.10 Overview of Marketed Products in Type 2 Diabetes 4.11 Unmet Need and Commercial Opportunities in T2DM 5 Assessment of Pipeline Product Innovation 5.1 Pipeline by Stage of Development, Molecule Type and Molecular Target 5.2 Comparative Distribution of Programs between the Market and Pipeline by Molecular Target Class 5.3 First-in-Class Programs by Molecular Target Category 6 Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Signaling Network, Disease Causation and Innovation Alignment 6.1 Complexity of Signaling Networks 6.2 Signaling Pathways and First-in-Class Molecular Target Integration 6.3 First-in-Class Matrix Assessment 7 First-in-Class Target and Pipeline Program Evaluation 7.1 Pipeline Programs Targeting Insulin Receptor Substrate 1 and Insulin Receptor Substrate 7.2 Pipeline Programs Targeting G-Protein Coupled Receptor Kinase 5 (GRK5) 7.3 Pipeline Programs Targeting Type 2 Angiotensin II Receptor 7.4 Pipeline Programs Targeting Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (IAPP) 7.5 Pipeline Programs Targeting Nacht LRR and PYD Domains Containing Protein 7.6 Pipeline Programs Targeting Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma Coactivator 1 Alpha (PPARGC1A) 7.7 Pipeline Programs Targeting Glucagon 7.8 Pipeline Programs Targeting Alpha Synuclein 7.9 Pipeline Programs Targeting Microtubule Associated Protein Tau 8 Strategic Consolidations 8.1 Industry-Wide First-in-Class Deals 8.2 Licensing Deals 8.3 Co-development Deals 8.4 First-in-Class Programs Not Involved in Licensing or Co-development Deals 9 Appendix For more information about this drug pipelines report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/ql886r/frontier_pharma


News Article | April 30, 2017
Site: www.npr.org

Being A Guinea Pig For Science Can Be A Long, Slow Slog "Why am I doing this, again?" I've asked myself that question several mornings over the past few months as my stomach begins growling, usually after I smell popcorn in my coworker's office. He's on a strict 10 a.m. popcorn schedule that coincides with my strict 10 a.m. hunger pang schedule. I am following an intermittent fasting program as part of a clinical trial for people with multiple sclerosis. For the past five months, I have tried to eat only between noon and 8 p.m., and am allowed only water, tea or coffee during the remaining 16 hours. It's part of a study at Johns Hopkins Medicine in which researchers are looking at bacteria in the guts of patients with multiple sclerosis to determine whether intermittent fasting changes the number, the types, or the functions of our bacteria. They're also looking to see if any of those changes affect inflammation and the symptoms we experience. Scientists know that fasting can affect the microbiome, according to Dr. Ellen Mowry, associate professor of neurology and epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University and lead researcher for the study. But they don't yet know now. Right now, researchers are simply trying to determine which dietary changes affect the microbiome and what the effects are. It's a complicated interplay of microbes, the human body, the environment and genetics. The science is hard, yes, but so is the intermittent fasting! Mowry said in an email that when she tries to fast along with participants, she has found it difficult to maintain. "But often for me," she says, "this is related more to my mental stamina rather than physical." I agree. Over five months, it's been the same nearly every day — I do get a little hungry in the mornings, but I'm thinking about eating more often. I have only eaten any earlier than noon once or twice during the study, like the infamous O'Hare Airport incident when I just couldn't resist that bagel. I still have no regrets. My slip-ups tend to be when I'm running late and eat after 8 p.m. I don't think I've screwed up enough to affect the tests, and I've been honest when it comes to food logging. In a previous fasting study looking at calorie restriction, researchers had more to rely on than participants' word that they were following the diet. "We can predict the amount of weight people should lose in a given time period, so if they aren't doing it," Mowry says, "we can guess adherence isn't accurate." But for this study, it's not so easy. The biggest challenge is sample size — 54 people are enrolled in the study I'm doing. Some are fasting, some are on a restricted calorie diet; and some are in the control group, doing nothing different. "The studies are too small to be certain that any change in symptoms is related to the intervention," Mowry says. She wants to do larger studies, but finding funding for dietary studies is difficult. Also, self-reporting isn't always the most accurate way to get data. Mowry says ideally participants would log meals during food recalls every 24 hours with trained professionals. In other words, I would go in on a Tuesday and tell someone what I ate and drank on Monday. I would explain how food was prepared, how much I ate and drank, and so on. This isn't easy to do because, again, money. There's just not enough to hire the professionals needed. Instead of food recalls, we intermittent fasters text pictures twice a week of what we ate and drank that day. As I entered the final few months of the study, I found myself forgetting more and more to take the pictures before I eat. I have sent more than one photo of a mostly-empty plate with the note, "Sorry! I forgot to snap a picture." I was entering a period of fasting fatigue. Obviously, I needed to get pumped again. So I set up a Google Alert for "microbiome." I cozied up with Ed Yong's book I Contain Multitudes, about the human microbiome, before bed every night — I highly recommend it. I got sucked into thousands of journal articles, skimming everything from "Role of the Gut Microbiome in Obesity and Diabetes Mellitus" in Nutrition in Clinical Practice to "HOW RESEARCH INTO THE MICROBIOME CAN BE USED TO SOLVE CRIMES" in the Southern California Interdisciplinary Law Journal. (I have no idea why the title was in all caps, but I took that as a sign I should read it.) If I decide to continue with intermittent fasting once the study is over, new motivation may come in the form of results from a previous study that Mowry will present this fall. The results should show if calorie restriction or a more extreme form of intermittent fasting called 5:2 fasting affect metabolism and how they affect the microbiome. The thing is, I'm not sure if I want to continue. In the beginning, my boyfriend, who is particularly observant and good at catching subtle changes that I may not notice, said I seemed to have a bit more energy and was not complaining (my word, not his!) about pain as often. And fasting has been a good way to maintain my weight. But a few months ago, my MS symptoms seemed to be worsening. This could be for a couple of reasons, but the big one is likely stress. Finishing my thesis, working, freelancing, gymming ... things reached a frenzied pace, and my pain levels skyrocketed. So did intermittent fasting help? A little, maybe? Not at all? The jury is still out, and it will likely end in deadlock. There are too many factors for me to consider. In about a month I'll return to the doctor with a stool sample and leave with permission to eat breakfast again. If I decide to keep up the fasting, at least I won't have the pressure of worrying that my slip-ups might compromise the work that Dr. Mowry, Research Study Coordinator Sam Roman and others have put into trying to help me and the estimated 2.5 million worldwide who have multiple sclerosis. And if I feel a pang of guilt if I want cream in my morning coffee — or heck, maybe I want breakfast! — I'll just remember what Mowry told me: "It can't be a totally inflexible diet plan; otherwise, it definitely won't be sustainable." Brandie Michelle Jefferson is a communications manager and freelance reporter who loves a good science story. She's on Twitter, too: @b_m_jefferson.


News Article | April 23, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Bangalore-based Suphala Care helps people to know the right meal specific to their life style, culture, habits, physical, mental and spiritual quotient At one of the most prestigious Indian IT companies as a consultant for health care, Dr Suguna was thinking it’s time to service the nation with more vigorousness. She had vast expertise till then in hospital systems, clinical trials, managing nutrition and diet for diabetes, women and children healthcare that she has been doing on and off her work. Suguna needed more control and focus to work her way to make the difference. At a Hyderabad hospital she met Shriram, her patient who became co-founder later for her dream venture that they both started in 2016 called Suphala Care. “Shriram got intensely interested in the nutritional way to make the change in the society and they started thinking about holistic wellness and nutrition as a way to achieve happiness and a decent business opportunity too,” says Suguna. Without spending too much time mulling over it, the duo came up with the name “Suphala Care” for their startup to denote a “Good Nutritious Food” Their USP: whosoever is coming to them should go happy after meeting them and get enlightened in the path of wellness, understand the ways to keep themselves fit- mentally and physically, prepare food well for their families, get knowledge about -how, when, why, where and how much to eat while meeting them during sessions at one go. Rustling up some money from their savings, they formed the centre in February 2015. “Today we have more than 3000 patients in the list, reviewed as one of the best nutritionist in South India (UrbanClap), do online and Face to Face counselling, and have written the book about the concept of Suphala Care –Holistic Food for Happiness– which has sold more than 20K copies till date,” Shriram beams with smile. Nutritionists, hospital physicians, and dietitians either are hard pressed for time, or don't have complete holistic knowledge to dedicate and understand the unique human wellness requirements. There was a huge gap. Academically, Dr. Suguna has a sound background on various nutritional, therapeutic nutrition and other dietary aspects, and was trained in lifestyle modifications and prevention of chronic disorders. She had over a decades experience in nutrition counselling and quality of life assessments especially in Diabetes Mellitus, Chronic heart diseases and Renal diseases. “Suguna’s research education has equipped her with extensive knowledge in holistic nutrition, health coaching, and preventive health care. Drawing on these skills and my knowledge of different applied dietary theories, her team works with clients to help them make lifestyle changes that produce practical and lasting results,” says Shriram. Suguna has worked as nutrition adviser and consultant for Life Sciences and Healthcare projects for several multinational, voluntary organisations, Pharma and Nutraceutical companies during her various job stints. She has also worked on developing tools for health care and life sciences domains. Suguna has a keen interest in cooking especially cooking without fire and enjoys experimenting with various foods to bring in the best on the platter. Working together with clients to create the best and mutually refined meal and pattern has become the differentiation between Suphala Care and other diet shops. “While most dietitians dwell on calories, carbs, fats, proteins, restrictions, and lists of good and bad foods, I work with my clients to create a happy, healthy life in a way that is flexible, fun, and free of denial and discipline. This involves a series of hands on cooking demos, recipes customised to their needs and techniques to assess your quality of life and help you accept the changes gradually,” says Dr Suguna with lot of enthusiasm. Suphala (as every member in Suphala Care likes calling themselves) shall guide you, in sessions that can take place either in person or over the phone, to find the food and lifestyle choices that best support you. Suphala will also help you to make gradual, lifelong changes to your habits. Suphala care monetises through generic doctor patient model. A network of doctors from various cities, workshops in corporate offices, teaching culinary skills to children, mothers, and clients from India and abroad, conference talks on Holistic Food for Happiness along with daily 45mins to 1.5hrs session with patients which can happen online, discussions on the custom comprehensive report- are the revenue generation vehicle for the centre. “Quality time with my patients and seeing smile on their faces is my top most priority, money is secondary. At the end of the month when I see an sms, review or even an email saying that my patient is happy because of me and he/she would continue seeking my guidance going forward, I have got what I wanted for,” says Suguna. “I am writing my second book – Genie in your foods- after –my first book -Holistic Food for Happiness- and just enjoying the life by doing what I know best,” says a composed Suguna.


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Boston, MA-- A new study led by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital has found that a single measurement of plasma glycated CD59 (GCD59), a novel biomarker for diabetes, at weeks 24-28 of gestation identified, with high sensitivity and specificity, women who failed the glucose challenge test as well as women with gestational diabetes. Plasma levels of GCD59 were also associated with the probability of delivering a large-for-gestational-age newborn. These findings are published in Diabetes Care. Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that occurs during a woman's pregnancy, increasing the mother's risk of delivering a large-for-gestational-age baby, which can lead to pre-term birth, fetal injury, perinatal mortality and cesarean delivery. Gestational diabetes is also a risk factor for preeclampsia and gestational hypertension. Since treatment of gestational diabetes can lessen the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes, practice guidelines recommend screening all non-diabetic, pregnant women for the disease. The current standard of care to both screen and diagnose gestational diabetes predominantly involves a two-step approach. The first step, known as the glucose challenge test, includes administration of a sugary drink followed by a blood sugar measurement one hour later. Women who fail this screening are then sent for a longer test, called the oral glucose tolerance test, which requires fasting overnight, drinking a more concentrated sugar solution and undergoing baseline and hourly blood draws for three hours. These glucose tests, or variations thereof, are currently the only methods used to screen pregnant women for or diagnose gestational diabetes. They are time consuming, cumbersome, uncomfortable for mothers and have poor reported reproducibility. The research team's primary goal was to assess the accuracy of the diabetes biomarker, GCD59, in predicting the results of the standard of care glucose challenge test used to screen for gestational diabetes. The team conducted a case-control study of 1,000 pregnant women who were receiving standard prenatal care at BWH: 500 women who had a normal glucose challenge test (control subjects) and 500 women who failed the glucose challenge test and required a subsequent oral glucose tolerance test (case patients). Researchers found that, when compared with the control subjects, the median plasma GCD59 value was 8.5-fold higher in the patients who failed the glucose challenge test and 10-fold higher in the subset of these patients who met diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes in the subsequent oral glucose tolerance test. "This is the first study to demonstrate that a single measurement of plasma GCD59 can be used as a simplified method to identify women who are at risk for failing the glucose challenge test and are at higher risk for developing gestational diabetes," says Jose Halperin, MD, a physician and researcher, Director of the Hematology Laboratory for Translational Research at BWH and senior author of the publication. The researchers also found that higher plasma GCD59 levels at gestational week 24-28 were associated with higher prevalence of large-for-gestational-age newborns, with the higher the level, the higher the risk (4 percent higher risk for patients in the lowest quartile of GCD59 plasma levels, and 14 percent in the highest quartile). Out of the 58 large-for-gestational-age babies born to mothers that failed the glucose challenge test in this study, 80 percent were born to mothers who did not meet oral glucose tolerance test criteria for gestational diabetes, but had median plasma GCD59 levels 7-fold higher than control women with a normal glucose challenge test. These findings are consistent with other studies showing that women who fail the glucose challenge test, but do not meet criteria for gestational diabetes, are still at a higher risk of abnormal pregnancy outcomes, including delivering large for gestational age babies. Currently there are no practice guidelines for the management of women who fall between normal and abnormal glucose tolerance levels, and, therefore, their management is the same as that for women with a normal glucose challenge test results. "These results suggest that a single measurement of plasma GCD59 during weeks 24-28 may also help stratify the risk for delivering larger infants among women with gestational glucose intolerance." says Halperin. "Our studies opened an avenue for larger multicenter studies to further assess the clinical utility of plasma GCD59 for screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes among the general population of the United States. If our results are confirmed, we're hopeful that the GCD59 test could be available in clinical practices within the next few years." Jose Halperin and Michael Chorev have a financial interest in Mellitus, LLC, which is developing diagnostic tools for diabetes, including the test described in this research under a license agreement from Harvard University. This project was supported by the National Institutes of Health grants DK-095429, DK-62994, DK-089206, DK-101442, DK-107407, and HL-111771. It was also funded by the Harvard University Accelerator Fund, now known as the Blavatnik Biomedical Accelerator at Harvard University and the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. Paper cited: Halperin et al. "Plasma Glycated CD59, a Novel Biomarker for Detection of Pregnancy-Induced Glucose Intolerance." Diabetes Care DOI: 10.2337/dc16-2598. Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) is a 793-bed nonprofit teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School and a founding member of Partners HealthCare. BWH has more than 4.2 million annual patient visits and nearly 46,000 inpatient stays, is the largest birthing center in Massachusetts and employs nearly 16,000 people. The Brigham's medical preeminence dates back to 1832, and today that rich history in clinical care is coupled with its national leadership in patient care, quality improvement and patient safety initiatives, and its dedication to research, innovation, community engagement and educating and training the next generation of health care professionals. Through investigation and discovery conducted at its Brigham Research Institute (BRI), BWH is an international leader in basic, clinical and translational research on human diseases, more than 3,000 researchers, including physician-investigators and renowned biomedical scientists and faculty supported by nearly $666 million in funding. For the last 25 years, BWH ranked second in research funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) among independent hospitals. BWH is also home to major landmark epidemiologic population studies, including the Nurses' and Physicians' Health Studies and the Women's Health Initiative as well as the TIMI Study Group, one of the premier cardiovascular clinical trials groups. For more information, resources and to follow us on social media, please visit BWH's online newsroom.


DUBLIN, April 20, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Forecast in 12 Major Markets 2017-2027" report to their offering. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is a multisystem disease that progressively destroys the...


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Forecast in 12 Major Markets 2017-2027" report to their offering. Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is a multisystem disease that progressively destroys the pancreas' ability to produce insulin. This leads to a chronic condition of defective metabolism of fat, carbohydrates and proteins due to the lack of insulin. It occurs mainly in childhood and adolescents, however a rising number of latent autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA) cases have been reported mainly due to a better understanding and diagnosis of the disease. This report provides the current prevalent population for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus across 12 Major Markets (USA, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, UK, Brazil, Japan, India, China and Russia) split by gender and 5-year age cohort. Along with the current prevalence, the report also contains a disease overview of the risk factors, disease diagnosis and prognosis along with specific variations by geography and ethnicity. Providing a value-added level of insight from the analysis team, several of the main symptoms and co-morbidities of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus have been quantified and presented alongside the overall prevalence figures. These sub-populations within the main disease are also included at a country level across the 10-year forecast snapshot. - Able to quantify patient populations in global Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus market to target the development of future products, pricing strategies and launch plans. - Gain further insight into the prevalence of the subdivided types of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus and identify patient segments with high potential. - Delivery of more accurate information for clinical trials in study sizing and realistic patient recruitment for various countries. - Provide a level of understanding on the impact from specific co-morbid conditions on Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus prevalent population. - Gain an understanding of the specific markets that have the largest number of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus patients. 2. Cause of the Disease 7. Key Comorbid Conditions/Features associated with the disease 11. Abbreviations used in the report For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/j3bqpv/type_1_diabetes

Loading Mellitus collaborators
Loading Mellitus collaborators