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Geevarghese S.K.,Vanderbilt University | Geller D.A.,University of Pittsburgh | De Haan H.A.,Clinical Research | Horer M.,MediGene | And 7 more authors.
Human Gene Therapy | Year: 2010

This multicenter phase I/II study evaluated the safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor effects of repeated doses of NV1020, a genetically engineered oncolytic herpes simplex virus, in patients with advanced metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients with liver-dominant mCRC received four fixed NV1020 doses via weekly hepatic artery infusion, followed by two or more cycles of conventional chemotherapy. Phase I included cohorts receiving 3 × 10 6, 1 × 107, 3 × 107, and 1 × 108 plaque-forming units (PFU)/dose to determine the optimal biological dose (OBD) for phase II. Blind independent computed tomography scan review was based on RECIST (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors) to assess hepatic tumor response. Phase I and II enrolled 13 and 19 patients, respectively. Patients experienced transient mild-moderate febrile reactions after each NV1020 infusion. Grade 3/4 virus-related toxicity was limited to transient lymphopenia in two patients. NV1020 shedding was not detected. Simultaneous cytokine and grade 1 coagulation perturbations were dose-limiting at 1 × 108 PFU/dose, considered the OBD. All 22 OBD patients had previously received 5-fluorouracil; most had received oxaliplatin or irinotecan (50% had both), many with at least one targeted agent. After NV1020 administration, 50% showed stable disease. The best overall tumor control rate after chemotherapy was 68% (1 partial response, 14 stable disease); this did not correlate with baseline variables or chemotherapy. Median time to progression was 6.4 months (95% confidence interval: 2, 8.9); median overall survival was 11.8 months (95% confidence interval: 8.3, 20.7). One-year survival was 47.2%. We conclude that NV1020 stabilizes liver metastases with minimal toxicity in mCRC. It may resensitize metastases to salvage chemotherapy and extend overall survival. A randomized phase II/III trial now appears justified. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2010.


Manzano-Szalai K.,University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna | Manzano-Szalai K.,International Biomedical | Thell K.,Medical University of Vienna | Thell K.,International Biomedical | And 16 more authors.
Viral Immunology | Year: 2014

Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) are established vectors for gene therapy of different human diseases. AAVs are assembled of 60 capsomers, which can be genetically modified, allowing high-density display of short peptide sequences at their surface. The aim of our study was to evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of an adeno-associated virus-like particle (AAVLP)-displayed B-cell peptide epitope taking ovalbumin (OVA) as a model antigen or allergen from egg, respectively. An OVA-derived B-cell epitope was expressed as fusion protein with the AAV-2 capsid protein of VP3 (AAVLP-OVA) and for control, with the nonrelated peptide TP18 (AAVLP-TP18). Cellular internalization studies revealed an impaired uptake of AAVLP-OVA by mouse BMDC, macrophages, and human HeLa cells. Nevertheless, BALB/c mice immunized subcutaneously with AAVLP-OVA formed similarly high titers of OVA-specific IgG1 compared to mice immunized with the native OVA. The extent of the immune response was independent whether aluminum hydroxide or water in oil emulsion was used as adjuvant. Furthermore, in mice immunized with native OVA, high OVA-specific IgE levels were observed, which permitted OVA-specific mast-cell degranulation in a β-hexosaminidase release assay, whereas immunizations with AAVLP-OVA rendered background IgE levels only. Accordingly, OVA-immunized mice, but not AAVLP-OVA immunized mice, displayed an anaphylactic reaction with a significant drop of body temperature upon intravenous OVA challenge. From this mouse model, we conclude that AAVLPs that display B-cell epitope peptides on their surface are suitable vaccine candidates, especially in the field of allergy. © 2014 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

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