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"The cumulative maturity of the U.S. analytics market will be streamlined by timely intervention from CMS which strongly advocates the need to measure and benchmark patient outcomes through information technology (IT)," said Digital Health Industry Analyst Koustav Chatterjee. "This year, the healthcare market is likely to accelerate the adoption of best-in-class analytics solutions, mainly for quality reporting which is an integral component of value-based care and population health management (PHM)." US Healthcare Data Analytics Market, Forecast to 2020, new analysis from Frost & Sullivan's Digital Health Growth Partnership Service program, defines best practices in terms of design, deployment and governance of clinical, financial, and operational data analytics solutions by payers and providers in the U.S. To receive Frost & Sullivan's latest infographic on healthcare data analytics market and to talk to us, please click here. U.S. healthcare data analytics market is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 15.0 percent through 2020. The key driver for growth will be the steady expansion of analytics beyond population risk assessment and quality reporting to other major opportunity areas, such as precision medicine, clinical surveillance, administrative automation, revenue cycle management, supply chain optimization and clinical asset utilization. "A significant challenge in the market is the low interoperability between Incumbent and emerging IT solutions, which restricts the effective sourcing, harmonizing and normalizing of disparate patient data at an enterprise level," observed Chatterjee. "Large health systems, embracing value-based care across different departments, are compelled to utilize multiple analytics partners for comprehensive patient data analysis and visualization. This challenge requires the entry of next-generation health data analytics solutions that connect those siloed departments and remain highly scalable," he added. While the need for both platform-based offerings (built in with PHM, EHR-electronic health records, RCM-revenue cycle management and CDSS-clinical decision support systems) and modular analytics solutions will intensify, vendor selection will remain tedious since the U.S. healthcare analytics market is highly fragmented. "Participants must clearly communicate the cumulative benefits of analytics deployment on enterprise cost, quality and outcomes across all levels and to all potential users in order to penetrate or thrive in the market," he explained. Major market participants include Health Catalyst, IBM Watson Health, Cerner, athenahealth, Arcadia, Medicity, Tableau, ZeOmega, and SCIO Health Analytics which are leveraging predictive analytics to support visionary innovations in precision care. "Care providers will be most receptive to use healthcare data analytics to identify, assess and benchmark cost trends by payer, patient and physician mix, whereas payers are likely to opt for these solutions to identify quality-adjusted and evidence-based target prices for every episode of care," noted Chatterjee. "On the vendor side, specialty-specific solutions will gain prominence among providers striving to benchmark chronic conditions at a population level. Both traditional and non-traditional players will continue to identify, assess, and collaborate with ecosystem partners to cater to the evolving market needs." For more information or to schedule an interview with our analysts please contact Mariana Fernandez, Corporate Communications at mariana.fernandez@frost.com. About Frost & Sullivan Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, works in collaboration with clients to leverage visionary innovation that addresses the global challenges and related growth opportunities that will make or break today's market participants. For more than 50 years, we have been developing growth strategies for the global 1000, emerging businesses, the public sector and the investment community. Is your organization prepared for the next profound wave of industry convergence, disruptive technologies, increasing competitive intensity, Mega Trends, breakthrough best practices, changing customer dynamics and emerging economies?


Careful design, implementation and governance of value-based analytics crucial to unlock more growth opportunities, finds Frost & Sullivan's Transformational Health team SANTA CLARA, California, May 11, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Healthcare analytics is widely considered as a key enabler of value-based care. Robust usage of this technology allows health systems to practice data-driven decision making, which improves operational efficiencies, eliminates preventable costs, and streamlines clinical effectiveness. Currently, analytics adoption among the United States (U.S.) healthcare payers and providers is not consistent; some health systems might utilize advanced enterprise data processing architecture to derive patient-specific insight for every episode of care, whereas others still rely on basic reporting capabilities of legacy business intelligence (BI) tools. As the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) compels more health systems to attribute higher net revenue to patient outcomes, analytics investment tied to population health management (PHM) will be a priority over the next five years. "The cumulative maturity of the U.S. analytics market will be streamlined by timely intervention from CMS which strongly advocates the need to measure and benchmark patient outcomes through information technology (IT)," said Digital Health Industry Analyst Koustav Chatterjee. "This year, the healthcare market is likely to accelerate the adoption of best-in-class analytics solutions, mainly for quality reporting which is an integral component of value-based care and population health management (PHM)." US Healthcare Data Analytics Market, Forecast to 2020, new analysis from Frost & Sullivan's Digital Health Growth Partnership Service program, defines best practices in terms of design, deployment and governance of clinical, financial, and operational data analytics solutions by payers and providers in the U.S. To receive Frost & Sullivan's latest infographic on healthcare data analytics market and to talk to us, please click here. U.S. healthcare data analytics market is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 15.0 percent through 2020. The key driver for growth will be the steady expansion of analytics beyond population risk assessment and quality reporting to other major opportunity areas, such as precision medicine, clinical surveillance, administrative automation, revenue cycle management, supply chain optimization and clinical asset utilization. "A significant challenge in the market is the low interoperability between Incumbent and emerging IT solutions, which restricts the effective sourcing, harmonizing and normalizing of disparate patient data at an enterprise level," observed Chatterjee. "Large health systems, embracing value-based care across different departments, are compelled to utilize multiple analytics partners for comprehensive patient data analysis and visualization. This challenge requires the entry of next-generation health data analytics solutions that connect those siloed departments and remain highly scalable," he added. While the need for both platform-based offerings (built in with PHM, EHR-electronic health records, RCM-revenue cycle management and CDSS-clinical decision support systems) and modular analytics solutions will intensify, vendor selection will remain tedious since the U.S. healthcare analytics market is highly fragmented. "Participants must clearly communicate the cumulative benefits of analytics deployment on enterprise cost, quality and outcomes across all levels and to all potential users in order to penetrate or thrive in the market," he explained. Major market participants include Health Catalyst, IBM Watson Health, Cerner, athenahealth, Arcadia, Medicity, Tableau, ZeOmega, and SCIO Health Analytics which are leveraging predictive analytics to support visionary innovations in precision care. "Care providers will be most receptive to use healthcare data analytics to identify, assess and benchmark cost trends by payer, patient and physician mix, whereas payers are likely to opt for these solutions to identify quality-adjusted and evidence-based target prices for every episode of care," noted Chatterjee. "On the vendor side, specialty-specific solutions will gain prominence among providers striving to benchmark chronic conditions at a population level. Both traditional and non-traditional players will continue to identify, assess, and collaborate with ecosystem partners to cater to the evolving market needs." For more information or to schedule an interview with our analysts please contact Mariana Fernandez, Corporate Communications at mariana.fernandez@frost.com. About Frost & Sullivan Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, works in collaboration with clients to leverage visionary innovation that addresses the global challenges and related growth opportunities that will make or break today's market participants. For more than 50 years, we have been developing growth strategies for the global 1000, emerging businesses, the public sector and the investment community. Is your organization prepared for the next profound wave of industry convergence, disruptive technologies, increasing competitive intensity, Mega Trends, breakthrough best practices, changing customer dynamics and emerging economies?


US Healthcare Data Analytics Market, Forecast to 2020, new analysis from Frost & Sullivan's Digital Health Growth Partnership Service program, defines best practices in terms of design, deployment and governance of clinical, financial, and operational data analytics solutions by payers and providers in the U.S. To receive Frost & Sullivan's latest infographic on healthcare data analytics market and to talk to us, please click here. U.S. healthcare data analytics market is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 15.0 percent through 2020. The key driver for growth will be the steady expansion of analytics beyond population risk assessment and quality reporting to other major opportunity areas, such as precision medicine, clinical surveillance, administrative automation, revenue cycle management, supply chain optimization and clinical asset utilization. "A significant challenge in the market is the low interoperability between Incumbent and emerging IT solutions, which restricts the effective sourcing, harmonizing and normalizing of disparate patient data at an enterprise level," observed Chatterjee. "Large health systems, embracing value-based care across different departments, are compelled to utilize multiple analytics partners for comprehensive patient data analysis and visualization. This challenge requires the entry of next-generation health data analytics solutions that connect those siloed departments and remain highly scalable," he added. While the need for both platform-based offerings (built in with PHM, EHR-electronic health records, RCM-revenue cycle management and CDSS-clinical decision support systems) and modular analytics solutions will intensify, vendor selection will remain tedious since the U.S. healthcare analytics market is highly fragmented. "Participants must clearly communicate the cumulative benefits of analytics deployment on enterprise cost, quality and outcomes across all levels and to all potential users in order to penetrate or thrive in the market," he explained. Major market participants include Health Catalyst, IBM Watson Health, Cerner, athenahealth, Arcadia, Medicity, Tableau, ZeOmega, and SCIO Health Analytics which are leveraging predictive analytics to support visionary innovations in precision care. "Care providers will be most receptive to use healthcare data analytics to identify, assess and benchmark cost trends by payer, patient and physician mix, whereas payers are likely to opt for these solutions to identify quality-adjusted and evidence-based target prices for every episode of care," noted Chatterjee. "On the vendor side, specialty-specific solutions will gain prominence among providers striving to benchmark chronic conditions at a population level. Both traditional and non-traditional players will continue to identify, assess, and collaborate with ecosystem partners to cater to the evolving market needs." For more information or to schedule an interview with our analysts please contact Mariana Fernandez, Corporate Communications at mariana.fernandez@frost.com. About Frost & Sullivan Frost & Sullivan, the Growth Partnership Company, works in collaboration with clients to leverage visionary innovation that addresses the global challenges and related growth opportunities that will make or break today's market participants. For more than 50 years, we have been developing growth strategies for the global 1000, emerging businesses, the public sector and the investment community. Is your organization prepared for the next profound wave of industry convergence, disruptive technologies, increasing competitive intensity, Mega Trends, breakthrough best practices, changing customer dynamics and emerging economies? To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/healthcare-data-analytics-moves-beyond-siloed-business-intelligence-to-coordinated-population-health-management-and-precision-care-300456090.html


BURLINGTON, Vt. & SALT LAKE CITY--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Vermont Information Technology Leaders, Inc. (VITL), operators of the Vermont Health Information Exchange (Vermont HIE), and Medicity, the leading provider of population health management solutions, today announced that VITL has launched its external connection to the Veterans Health Information Exchange (VHIE), also known as the Virtual Lifetime Electronic Record (VLER) program. This makes it easier for providers inside and outside the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to share health information for the more than 48,600 veterans who live in Vermont. The first external connection to the Vermont HIE, implemented by its technology vendor, Medicity, will allow clinicians at the VA to view patient records from contributing health care organizations across Vermont and the surrounding region. “As a psychologist working with veterans, I can’t overemphasize just how important it is to securely share information with colleagues outside of the VA,” said Kenneth Major, PsyD, a practicing psychologist at White River Junction VA Medical Center. “It’s important to have a complete picture of your patient’s care, no matter where they receive it.” Likewise, health care providers in Vermont can view health data from the VA medical system using VITLAccess, the secure provider portal to the Vermont HIE. This bi-directional exchange of data can improve transitions of care between veterans and community health care facilities. Timely, accurate information may help reduce duplicative testing, lower costs and improve the quality of care for veterans. This is the first network to network connection for VITL and the first Medicity connection with the Veterans HIE. “We’re excited about this bi-directional exchange with the VA medical system,” said John K. Evans, president and CEO of VITL. “Our organizations have been working for more than a year to put this community exchange in place, and we are proud to provide services that will help provide better care for our veterans within the Vermont health system.” VITL selected Medicity as its technology partner in 2011 in an effort to meet its growing technology needs. Since then, Medicity and VITL have dramatically increased the number of Vermont health care organizations that are connected to the Vermont HIE. The Vermont HIE collects and indexes data directly from the electronic health record (EHR) systems of all of Vermont’s hospitals, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, and 221 health care locations. The Vermont HIE delivers laboratory results and transcribed reports to the electronic health record systems of 134 health care locations, provides a secure provider portal to access longitudinal health records of more than two million patients, and sends data to Vermont’s accountable care organizations, the Vermont Department of Health and the Vermont Blueprint for Health. “Medicity is proud to support our veterans and expand our population health technology solutions across the nation,” said Patrice Wolfe, Medicity CEO. “Our veterans can enjoy the benefits provided by the nationwide interoperability delivered through the Vermont HIE and VLER exchange program.” Vermont Information Technology Leaders, Inc. (VITL) is a nonprofit organization that advances health care reform in Vermont. VITL assists Vermont health care providers with adopting and using health information technology, to improve the quality of care delivery, to enhance patient safety and to reduce the cost of care. VITL is legislatively designated to operate the health information exchange (HIE) for Vermont, and is governed by a collaborative group of stakeholders including health plans, hospitals, physicians, other health care providers, state government, employers, and consumers. For more information, please visit www.vitl.net. Medicity is a recognized expert in building large clinically connected communities. With nearly 20 years of experience in aggregating, readying and distributing data for population health, we’ve created a collaborative network that processes more than 6 billion clinical transactions each year. Our innovative solutions provide a powerful data foundation that enables your unique population health goals. Medicity’s intelligent integration of clinical information across the care community leads to enhanced clinical and business workflows, improved decision-making, more engaged providers and patients and better managed populations. Medicity, is an independent subsidiary of Aetna (NYSE: AET). For more information, visit www.medicity.com. VLER Health Exchange – allows VA providers and participating community providers to query and retrieve Veterans’ health information from each other’s organizations for the purpose of treatment. Partnered with the national eHealth Exchange managed by the Sequoia Project, we promote a common mission and purpose to improve patient care, streamline disability benefit claims, and improve public health reporting through secure, trusted and interoperable health information exchange.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

South Country Health Alliance (SCHA) announced it has successfully designed, developed, and implemented the first county population health solution that delivers electronic notification services to the full community. The new capability is part of SCHA’s Health Information Exchange, called DiamondView, which helps caregivers better manage care transitions throughout the entire cycle of care given to its members. DiamondView incorporates the county’s claims information with facility admissions, discharges, and transfers, as well as other community information, critical to delivering wellness to the county, with the insights to provide deeper care pathways for its members. The integration of this information, across the hospitals, clinics, county public health and social services, and other ancillary organizations in Kanabec County, makes it the first of its kind in the state of Minnesota. The new capabilities in DiamondView Alerts adds to the already operational solutions offered by SCHA: DiamondView Messaging, delivering direct secure messaging on any device, and DiamondView Analytics, delivering population health analytics. “Transitions of care alerts are critical for a variety of providers, not just the physicians and hospital,” said SCHA CEO Leota Lind. “Typically, other care providers, such as public health nurses or long-term care facilities, do not get notifications about patients in a timely fashion. Our new Health Information Exchange, DiamondView, changes that.” Sandy Zutz-Wiczek, COO of FirstLight Health System, states, “FirstLight’s goal is to improve patient care, and this transformative technology connects us with our community partners including St. Clare’s Living Community of Mora, Kanabec County Public Health, and other ancillary facilities, truly making the patient’s care, health, and safety a priority.” “Kanabec County, along with FirstLight Health System, St. Clare Living Community, and other community partners have had a long history of working together to coordinate care for residents,” said Kathy Burski of Kanabec County Community Health. “DiamondView will allow partners to provide greater coordination of care in a much more efficient manner. We are excited to be a part of this cutting-edge process and look forward to the improved patient/client outcomes that will result as the Health Information Exchange is rolled out in the community.” SCHA’s CIO, John Whitington, added: “Our key partners in making DiamondView a reality were Medicity as the application vendor and Timmaron Group for the integration and rollout. Both Timmaron Group’s know-how and national experience, coupled with Medicity’s deep expertise in interoperability, made this electronic notification service a true innovation for our health plan.” “Community care is a passion and focus for our team. It's about engaging and enabling all rural, urban, and ancillary caregivers to deliver better health outcomes and deliver that care more efficiently,” said Barbara Stinnett, Timmaron Group CEO. “We are proud to be partners with South Country and Medicity to make this innovation a reality here in Minnesota.” "We are excited about the launch of ‘Medicity Notify’ with South Country and Timmaron Group in Kanabec County,” said Patrice R. Wolfe, CEO of Medicity. “With event-based notifications, organizations can deliver essential information to the right hands at the right time to support care coordination and patient outcomes.” South Country Health Alliance is rolling out these capabilities across their 11 counties and welcomes collaboration from communities here in Minnesota. About SCHA South Country Health Alliance, based in Owatonna, Minnesota, is a county-based purchasing health plan owned by 11 Minnesota counties — Brown, Dodge, Goodhue, Kanabec, Morrison, Sibley, Steele, Todd, Wabasha, Wadena, and Waseca — in a joint effort to support accessible, quality healthcare through partnerships with community services and local healthcare providers for Minnesota Health Care Program enrollees. SCHA began enrolling members in November 2001 and now covers more than 40,000 adults and children. The health plan offers comprehensive coverage and emphasizes preventive and routine care to meet the healthcare needs of Minnesota Health Care Program enrollees in its service area. For more information about SCHA, call 1-866-567-7242 or visit http://www.mnscha.org. About Timmaron Group Timmaron Group is a global healthcare and technology organization, consisting of operators from all aspects of the healthcare and technology markets. It is headquartered in Silicon Valley, with its healthcare business rooted in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It provides healthcare intelligence around the industry’s financial, business, and operational models, to aid the selection and implementation of various technologies into communities. Its clients range from entrepreneurs to Fortune 100 companies, and their investors. Timmaron Group brings a sensible and experienced view, provides innovative yet pragmatic solutions, and works with clients as a team member from strategy formation through execution to results. Learn more at http://www.timmarongroup.com. About Medicity Medicity, based in Salt Lake City, Utah, is a recognized expert in building large clinically connected communities. With nearly 20 years of experience in aggregating, readying, and distributing data for population health, it has created a collaborative network that processes more than six billion clinical transactions each year. Its innovative solutions provide a powerful data foundation to enable unique population health goals. Medicity’s intelligent integration of clinical information across the care community leads to enhanced clinical and business workflows, improved decision-making, more engaged providers and patients, and better managed populations. Medicity is an independent subsidiary of Aetna. For more information, visit http://www.medicity.com.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Most people know tuberculosis as a disease of the lungs, but that’s not always the case. For a 32-year-old woman in India, the disease manifested in her spine – in 10 different vertebrae, thanks to a lowered immune system caused by drugs she was taking for infertility. Her condition deteriorated quickly; the disease caused such extensive damage to her first, second and third cervical vertebrae that she no longer had any support between her skull and lower spine. As a result, the woman’s head was sliding forward and her posture curved in a way that obstructed her spinal cord, resulting in progressive weakness in her limbs. She was also at risk of quadriplegia and even death, if her respiratory nerves were to become compressed. But this young woman is going to be just fine, as impossible as that sounds. Surgeons at Medanta – the Medicity in Gurgaon, India, replaced the woman’s damaged first, second and third vertebrae with a 3D printed titanium implant in a 10-hour surgery, closing the gap between her skull and spine and allowing her to stand and walk normally again. It was the first time such a procedure had been performed in India, and among the first in the world, following similar operations in China that first took place in 2014 and a surgery that was performed a year ago in Australia. “Given the complexity of this case, the use of 3D printing technology has helped us in bringing a successful outcome,” Dr V Anand Naik, senior consultant (spine surgery) at Medanta’s Bone & Joint Institute, told the Indo-Asian News Service. Dr Naik led the surgical team that operated on the woman. “The patient today on 12 post-operative days is now walking with minimal support, all her pain has gone, her voice and dysphasia has recovered completely and, most importantly, her life was saved by this technique.” Sanjay Kumar Pathak of Global Health Care in New Delhi told 3DPrint.com that the titanium implant, customised to perfectly fit the patient’s spine, was designed at his company. CT and MRI scans helped create a replica of the woman’s spine so that the gaps between her vertebrae could be measured to ensure that the final printed vertebra would fit perfectly. The patient, a teacher, is recovering quickly, which is incredible considering the severity of her condition before the surgery. Just a few years ago, there would have been very little hope for her, but 3D printing is changing the prognosis of many severely ill and injured patients. “These techniques have opened a new avenue wherein any type of complex reconstruction can be done in the spine with less collateral damage,” said Dr Naik. The advancements that 3D printing has brought to the medical field are nothing short of astonishing. We may not yet be at the point where we can 3D print full human organs and transplant them into patients, but the fact that we can even talk about such a thing as a feasible possibility shows just how quickly and dramatically this technology is changing the industry. Although 3D printed organs are often talked about as the ultimate goal in medical 3D printing, and companies such as Organovo have already made an impact on pharmaceutical research with their 3D printed liver and kidney tissue, many of the biggest, most life-altering changes so far have been thanks to 3D printing’s ability to create customised implants and organ models. The young woman in India isn’t the only person to have been saved from paralysis by 3D printing; it would have seemed laughable a short time ago, but stopping or even reversing paralysis is now possible thanks to the advanced spinal surgeries and implants 3D printing allows. When dealing with the spine, there’s no room for error or imperfect fit, and the fact that no two bodies are exactly the same has rendered the “one size fits all” implants of the past ineffective or even harmful for many patients. Today’s advanced 3D technology allows for a perfect copy of an individual patient’s anatomy to be printed in plastic, meaning that surgeons can study the affected area or even practice procedures before operating. In addition, the design freedom that 3D printing allows means that implants can be produced that perfectly match that patient’s anatomy. We may not have 3D printed organs yet, but customised 3D printed implants are already synthetically reproducing – and replacing - parts of the human body.


Barreto S.G.,Medicity | Windsor J.A.,Auckland City Hospital
The Lancet Oncology | Year: 2016

Interest in radical surgery to achieve complete resection and improve long-term survival in patients undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy for ductal adenocarcinoma has been renewed. This surgery includes extended lymphadenectomy, multivisceral resections, and synchronous arterial and venous resections. The evidence that these surgeries improve long-term survival is poor, except perhaps for synchronous venous resection, which can be justified if a margin negative (R0) resection is achieved without increased morbidity and mortality, and if there is no invasion of the vein wall. The recognition of patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer and the increasing use of neoadjuvant treatment makes it more difficult to know if the vein is invaded, increases reliance on trial dissection to establish resectability, and might increase the number of synchronous venous resections done. This Personal View seeks to review the justification for pancreatoduodenectomy with synchronous venous resection to promote debate and draw attention to the gaps in knowledge for further research. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

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