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News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

National Prevention Week: The Effectiveness of Worksite Programs in Reducing Opioid Abuse Dr. Joel Bennett CEO and Founder Organizational Wellness & Learning Systems, Inc. (OWLS) While the opioid and prescription drug epidemic has received considerable attention given the over 300,000 people it affects annually, relatively few realize the impact it's also having on the nation's workforce. It's become increasingly commonplace for employees to use prescription medication outside of intended use to improve job performance, overcome lack of sleep, or to alleviate pain. Although 70% of employers are negatively impacted by Rx abuse, less than 25% educate workers on prevention. Thirty percent do not provide access to alternative treatments. Says Dr. Bennett: "Employers are starting to realize the negative effects of Rx abuse on employee readiness, morale and productivity. But prevention programs can be a hard sell -- it's a challenge to demonstrate a concrete business return. Employers need to know that worksite awareness and education programs can be very effective in engaging people at the earliest stages of their Rx use and in a non-threatening way, steer them to safe alternatives. SAMHSA (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) has laid out criteria and guidelines for evidence-based programs that produce positive outcomes; if properly implemented at the worksite, these programs have the potential to effectively educate a sizeable portion of at-risk employees who are otherwise hard to identify, let alone reach." Dr. Bennett is a widely sought-after speaker, consultant, and source on issues pertaining to evidence-based wellness. He has also published in a broad variety of academic, industry and business publications and consults internationally. ProfNet Profile: http://www.profnetconnect.com/joel_bennett Website: http://organizationalwellness.com Contact: Charles Epstein, che@backboneinc.com AI and Machine Learning in Medical Imaging Martin Hedlund Chief Technology Officer ContextVision "The concept of AI and machine learning has the potential to change the game of medical imaging. We can train neural networks with much more data than humans experience during a lifetime. This means that we can reproduce the competence of the best experts, or even outperform them! We can guarantee reproducibility in exams and diagnosis, and avoid human subjectivity and variations. With active learning models, results can continuously be improved. With better ground truth, i.e. data from different sources, time or outcome, AI can make better predictions, solve more complex tasks and make new discoveries." Based in Stockholm, Sweden, Hedlund is the chief technology officer and one of the founders of ContextVision. He finished his M.Sc. degree of Technology followed by further studies and research in image processing and GOP theory at Linköping University. He was R&D and site manager in Linköping until 1999 and has since served as CTO by focusing on strategic product and business development. Hedlund is spearheading the research and development of ContextVision's first AI-based imaging technology. By using algorithms, the product will be able to evaluate and enhance image quality automatically without the direct involvement of a clinical expert. This will improve workflow and improve diagnosis, and ultimately aid both patients and radiologists. Website: www.contextvision.com Contact: Stephanie Ross, sross@mower.com The Most Important Body Part You're Not Working Out Jonathan Jordan Personal Trainer, Nutrition Coach and Fitness Blogger Jonathan Jordan Fitness "As a successful personal trainer for Equinox in San Francisco, I've worked with hundreds of clients. They want to be lean. They want to be strong. They want to be healthy. But no one ever says, 'I want strong feet and mobile ankles.' Yet weak feet are often the biggest roadblocks to achieving their health goals. The ankle is one of our most important and commonly overlooked joints. Pain and injuries in the knees, hips and lower back can often be traced to issues at the ankle joint. Think of how often and how many ways we use our ankles: walking, running, biking, squatting, yoga, balancing, dancing -- you get the idea. If the muscles acting on your ankle are chronically tight or if the joint itself is jammed or lacks proper mobility, the impact can be painful and damaging, as the body will compensate at other joints to accommodate movement." Jordan recently wrote a blog post (see link below) that goes deep into the anatomy of the foot and includes an interview with physical therapist Dr. Sarah Jay. He has also included videos for his three favorite ankle mobility drills. He is available for interviews to help your readers, listeners, or viewers improve their ankle mobility, reduce pain and improve performance in their workouts Blog post: http://www.jj-fit.com/blog/ankle ProfNet Profile: http://www.profnetconnect.com/jonathan_jordan Website: http://www.jj-fit.com Expert Contact: jj@jj-fit.com Can Stress Actually Kill You? Dr. Frieda Birnbaum Research Psychologist, Psychoanalyst Stress may take a toll on your mind, body, and heart, according to a new study from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Researchers observed a strong correlation between activity in the amygdala -- the part of the brain activated by stress -- and subsequent cardiac events, such as heart attack, stroke, and angina. Says Dr. Birnbaum: "Our bodies are constantly reacting and responding to how we are thinking. If we stay locked into a state of high stress and anxiety for a prolonged period of time, our physical health will be affected for the worse. Yes, stress can kill you. However, there are many things a person can do to help manage their stress or remove it all together. One of the first things is to get to the root cause of the matter and resolve it, especially if it has something to do with guilt. Guilt is a powerful negative emotion that can prolong stress. If your boss or fellow employees have become a cause of stress, do whatever you can to be as far removed from them as possible, even if it means leaving your job. Any form or daily meditating or walking is another means of quieting your mind and opening doors of inner peace. Listening to peaceful music is also helpful. Stress is reactionary -- and you have the power to change how to react." Based in the New York metro area, Dr. Birnbaum is author of "Life Begins at 60: A New View on Motherhood, Marriage, and Reinventing Ourselves." She's an expert on depression, women's issues, and attaining happiness. Website: http://www.doctorfrieda.com Contact: Ryan McCormick, ryan@goldmanmccormick.com Showtime's 'Billions' Predicts the Future Michael Klein, PsyD Psychologist, Principal MK Insights LLC Dr. Klein is available to speak about the relevance of the TV character Wendy Rhodes, an in-house psychiatrist in the fictitious firm of Axe Capital, as well as the history and trends behind this role. As a psychologist, he can address how personality, emotional intelligence, and motivators impact decision-making, management style, and potential "de-railing" behaviors: "It is impossible to work effectively in any job without running into roadblocks periodically. In-house psychiatrists and psychologists don't provide therapy at work but, rather, apply sound psychological insights and tools to help employees and managers be effective at work based on their own interest in achievement and managing psychological barriers." Dr. Klein is a psychologist, workplace coach, and in-house performance consultant. He is also author of "Trapped in the Family Business: A practical guide to understanding and managing this hidden dilemma." Book: www.trappedinthefamilybusiness.com Website: www.mkinsights.com Expert Contact: mklein@mkinsights.com Fireworks Safety Jenny Ziembicki, M.D. Medical Director, UPMC Mercy Burn Center Assistant Professor of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine Faculty Member, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine "Each year, around 4th of July celebrations, we treat many people, especially children and teens, who have been injured by fireworks. Many of those injuries involve an amputation of a limb or loss of vision. We want to remind everyone that fireworks should only be handled by professionals and enjoyed at a safe distance." Dr. Ziembicki has a special interest in the development of the comprehensive outpatient burn therapy program at UPMC Mercy, which allows patients a more expedient return to a productive lifestyle. She also is a dedicated advocate in burn injury prevention, especially in the geriatric and pediatric population. Bio: http://www.mirm.pitt.edu/our-people/faculty-staff-bios/jenny-ziembicki-md/ Contact: Stephanie Stanley, stanleysl@upmc.edu Skin Damage and Car/Home Windows Darrell Smith Executive Director International Window Film Association "Whether you're spending the summer on the road or enjoying the warm sunshine streaming through your home's windows, you may be doing serious damage to your skin without even realizing. The average window only blocks about 25% of UV rays from passing through and car windows aren't much better -- blocking about 40% of UV rays. In America, nearly 53% of skin cancer cases occur on the left, or driver's side, of the body. Why? Because, we enjoy sunshine but aren't fully protected against damaging UV rays -- and spend a lot of time in the car! Professionally installed window film can help block up to 99% of UV rays from passing through a window, ultimately protecting your skin and eyes from cumulative damage." Website: www.iwfa.com Contact: Amber Joy Dempsey, amber@warnerpr.com Fabric and Clothing Tips for Summer James Pruden Senior Director Cotton Incorporated Pruden can provide expert summer safety tips when it comes to anything and everything summer clothing, including what to wear for the best UV protection; what fabrics keep you cooler during the warm summer months; and the health benefits of natural fibers vs. synthetic fibers. Says Pruden: "All apparel provides some degree of UV protection. UV protection in apparel is dependent on a variety of factors, including thickness of fabric (thicker fabrics absorb more UV rays), tightness of construction and the fabric's color (darker colors provide more UV protection)." Pruden is senior director of public relations at Cotton Incorporated, where he oversees brand image management for the not-for-profit company. Contact: Caleb Fernandez, caleb.fernandez@fleishman.com Pool Safety Tips for Parents, Children and Pets Tom Casey Vice President of Sales Anthony & Sylvan Pools Casey is available to share pool safety tips for parents, children, and pets: "Pools are fun for the whole family, and pool safety is crucial when it comes to enjoying your pool to its fullest. By following just a few safety tips, you'll be sure to keep this season fun and safe." Casey is vice president of sales for Anthony & Sylvan Pools, the leading swimming pool and spa builder in the U.S. Contact: John Reynolds, john.reynolds@buchananpr.com Tips for an Injury-Free Summer Dr. Benjamin Domb "As the weather gets warmer and the days get longer, adults and kids alike love to engage in outdoor sports and fitness activities. This increase in physical activity can lead to an increased risk of injury." Through his experience working with athletes, both professional and amateur, as well as fitness enthusiasts like CrossFitters and runners, Dr. Domb is available to provide effective tips for an injury-free summer. Dr. Domb is a nationally recognized orthopedic surgeon specializing in sports medicine and arthroscopic surgery of the hip, shoulder and knee. Website: http://www.benjamindombmd.com Contact: Rachel Prude, Rachel.prude@allisonpr.com Summer BBQ Safety Tips Peter Duncanson Director, Disaster Restoration Business Operations ServiceMaster Restore Duncanson is available for interviews on summer BBQ safety tips, including proper charcoal grill safety, how to use a gas grill wisely, and how to practice good grilling habits: "Set your grill up at a safe distance from structures and overhangs, including your main building, shed, garage, trees and other potentially flammable objects. Never use your grill inside, in a tent or under an outdoor awning or carport. Doing so can pose a serious fire hazard and potentially cause carbon monoxide poisoning if you're using a gas grill. Light your gas or charcoal grill using special long-length lighters or long matches to avoid getting burned. Keep all ignition sources out of the reach of children. Never leave an actively burning grill unattended, and let your grill fully cool before you cover or store it. Clean your grill thoroughly and often to reduce flammable buildup inside." Contact: Bristol Whitcher, bwhitcher@conecomm.com Summer Safety Jared Staver Attorney Staver Law Group. P.C. Staver is available to discuss various summer safety topics, including sun glare accidents, motorcycle safety, pool/water safety, heat exhaustion and more. On motorcycle safety: "During the summer months, drivers and motorcyclists should take extra precautions to avoid accidents. Statistics show that more than 50% of motorcycle accidents involve riders with less than five months of riding experience. To minimize the risk of accidents, motorcyclists should always wear protective gear including proper eyewear and helmets. Make sure your bike is properly maintained before taking it out for the first summer ride and keep a toolkit on your bike at all times. Mechanical defects can contribute to road crashes." Staver is a Chicago personal injury attorney and owner of Staver Law Group, P.C. His practice focuses on representing people seeking compensation after being hurt in the Chicago area, whether by a car accident, slip and fall, workplace accident, dog bite, or from an act of medical malpractice. An experienced and dedicated litigator, Jared has recovered tens of millions of dollars in settlements and verdicts for his clients. Bio: https://www.chicagolawyer.com/about-staver-law-group/jared-staver/ Website: https://www.chicagolawyer.com Contact: John Branham, jb@chicagolawyer.com How to Stay Safe on the Job/Keep Employees Safe David Quezada Vice President of Loss Control EMPLOYERS "Working in hot and sunny environments or near heat sources all day can wear employees down. To help employees rest and recharge, encourage them to take regular breaks in the shade or other cool environments. Build break times into employees' schedules to help enforce the practice. Make sure employees know how to recognize the signs of heat-related illness and the immediate steps they need to take to help themselves or their co-workers. In the event of a medical emergency, contact 911 immediately, but also train employees so they can be proactive before professional help arrives. Fostering a safe and comfortable work environment is an important commitment every day of the year, but especially when new risks, such as extreme heat, are introduced." EMPLOYERS is a specialty workers' compensation insurance carrier. Website: www.employers.com Contact: Alexandra Gardell Kreuter, EmployersInsurance@allisonpr.com Managing Medications During the Summer Jon Michaeli EVP of Marketing and Business Development Medisafe Michaeli is available to discuss the importance of managing your medications during the summer months, whether it's during vacations or ensuring that your children are keeping up with their medications while they're at summer camp. Managing medications essentially helps you to manage your conditions, resulting in improved outcomes. Contact: Kendra Lee, medisafe@racepointglobal.com What to Do During a Power Outage Keith Pinkerton Owner Mr. Electric, Huntsville, Ala. Pinkerton is available to discuss weather precautions and backup generators during storm season. He can advise homeowners what to do when there is a power outage and how to ensure electrical safety around the house in general. He is the owner of the Huntsville, Ala., branch of Mr. Electric, a national brand of electrical installation and repair centers. Website: https://mrelectric.com/huntsville Contact: Elise Rose, erose@fishmanpr.com Safety When Completing House Projects J.B. Sassano President Mr. Handyman Sassano is available to discuss safety when completing house projects, such as using power washers, power drills, climbing on ladders for gutter cleaning, etc. He is president of Mr. Handyman, the nation's leading home repair and maintenance franchise. Website: https://www.mrhandyman.com Contact: Elise Rose, erose@fishmanpr.com Injury Trends Darshan Patel, M.D. Chief of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Maria Fareri Children's Hospital Dr. Patel can provide commentary on a wide variety of summer conditions and their recommended treatment, as well as injury trends. As Section Chief, Dr. Patel serves as head of the Pediatric Emergency Department. He and his team are the first line of care for children in needing immediate care after injuries or at the onset of illnesses. Maria Fareri Children's Hospital, a member of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network, is the Level 1 pediatric trauma center for a region with more than 3 million people. In the past, Dr. Patel has been a media resource for summer safety topics, including ATV and water safety, as well as injuries caused by trampolines and fireworks.  He has also contributed to reports regarding dehydration and heat stroke. He has television, radio and print media experience, and is adept at breaking down complex medical topics for families. He is available for media interviews when requests do not interfere with patient care. Contact: Andy LaGuardia, andrew.laguardia@wmchealth.org Water Safety Tips Ann Marie Buerkle Acting Chairman U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission Buerkle is available to discuss the many steps that parents can take to improve safety in and around water. As acting chairman of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), Buerkle offers a unique perspective into the importance of safety in and around water. One of the national public education campaigns the Chairman oversees is the Pool Safely campaign, which is aimed at reducing child drownings and non-fatal submersions, as well as entrapments in public swimming pools and spas. The campaign was launched in 2010 and has a network of over 1,000 partners that are dedicated to promoting and benefitting from the campaign. Website: https://www.poolsafely.gov Contact: Christina Saull: Christina.Saull@finnpartners.gov Following are links to job listings for staff and freelance writers, editors and producers. You can view these and more job listings on our Job Board: https://prnmedia.prnewswire.com/community/jobs/ Following are links to other news and resources we think you might find useful. If you have an item you think other reporters would be interested in and would like us to include in a future alert, please drop us a line. PROFNET is an exclusive service of PR Newswire. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/profnet-experts-available-on-summer-safety-opioid-abuse-stress-more-300460792.html


Matthes T.,University of Geneva | Manfroi B.,Joseph Fourier University | Zeller A.,Medicine Faculty | Dunand-Sauthier I.,Medicine Faculty | And 3 more authors.
Leukemia | Year: 2015

Multiple myeloma (MM) invariably develops in the bone marrow (BM), indicating the strong requirement of this tumor for the peculiar BM microenvironment, rich in cytokine and hematopoietic precursor cells. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and a proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) are key cytokines implicated in MM development. Here, we show that MM cells changed the hematopoietic microenvironment early upon BM infiltration by strongly downregulating hematopoietic precursor cells from all lineages except myeloid precursor cells. Myeloid precursor cells constituted a major source of APRIL in MM-infiltrated BM, and their proliferative response to IL-6 upregulation explained their relative resistance to MM infiltration. The osteolytic molecule receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANK-L) expressed by MM cells started this myeloid proliferation by inducing in a contact-dependent manner IL-6 production by myeloid precursor cells themselves. Taken together, our data demonstrate that MM cells do not simply displace hematopoietic cells upon BM infiltration, but rather selectively modulate the BM microenvironment to preserve a pool of high APRIL-producing myeloid precursor cells. Our data also identify a positive regulation of APRIL by IL-6 in myeloid precursor cells. © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.


Farage N.E.,Federal University of Fluminense | Stockler-Pinto M.B.,Federal University of Fluminense | Leal V.O.,Federal University of Fluminense | Cardozo L.L.,Federal University of Fluminense | And 3 more authors.
International Urology and Nephrology | Year: 2016

Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the association among the expressions of pro- and anti-inflammatory nuclear factors (nuclear factor-kappaB, NF-κB and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2, Nrf2) and nutritional status in HD patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study included eighty-three HD patients. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and processed for the evaluation of NF-κB and Nrf2 RNAm expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Muscle mass was estimated by creatinine index (CI) and percentage of body fat (%BF) by anthropometry. Seven-point subjective global assessment was also used to evaluate the nutritional status. Results: The NF-κB expression was negatively correlated with CI (r = −0.54, p = 0.0001), serum albumin (r = −0.32, p = 0.02) and %BF (r = −0.61, p = 0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that NF-κB expression was independently associated with CI (β: −0.8, p = 0.013) and %BF (β: −0.42, p = 0.04). There was no correlation among Nrf2 and anthropometric and biochemical variables. Conclusion: The classical NF-κB activation seems to be associated with poor nutritional status in HD patients; however, the exact underlying mechanisms deserve further studies. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht


PubMed | Federal University of Fluminense, Medicine Faculty and Center Hopitalier Lyon Sud
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International urology and nephrology | Year: 2016

This study aimed to evaluate the association among the expressions of pro- and anti-inflammatory nuclear factors (nuclear factor-kappaB, NF-B and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2, Nrf2) and nutritional status in HD patients.This cross-sectional study included eighty-three HD patients. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and processed for the evaluation of NF-B and Nrf2 RNAm expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Muscle mass was estimated by creatinine index (CI) and percentage of body fat (%BF) by anthropometry. Seven-point subjective global assessment was also used to evaluate the nutritional status.The NF-B expression was negatively correlated with CI (r=-0.54, p=0.0001), serum albumin (r=-0.32, p=0.02) and %BF (r=-0.61, p=0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that NF-B expression was independently associated with CI (: -0.8, p=0.013) and %BF (: -0.42, p=0.04). There was no correlation among Nrf2 and anthropometric and biochemical variables.The classical NF-B activation seems to be associated with poor nutritional status in HD patients; however, the exact underlying mechanisms deserve further studies.


News Article | November 11, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

AURORA, Colo. (Nov. 10, 2016) - - Researchers, led by scientists at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, have found basic molecular processes used by the Zika virus to "hijack" the cells that it infects and potentially how it makes molecules that are directly linked to disease. The discovery, published in the journal Science, shows that a part of the Zika virus's RNA genome folds up into a complex structure and that this structure leads to the production of smaller RNAs that in related viruses are directly linked to disease. Viruses cannot reproduce on their own, they must infect cells and "hijack" the cell's biological machinery in order to make more copies of themselves. To do this, viruses use many molecular strategies. Zika is an example of a virus that does not store its genome in DNA, rather it uses a related molecule called the viral genomic RNA. Viruses related to Zika, such as West Nile and Dengue, are known to produce a set of smaller RNAs during infection (in addition to the long genomic RNA) that have been directly linked to disease. This process had not been explored with Zika virus until this study. The findings of this study show that Zika infection leads to the production of these smaller RNAs in several types of cells. The researchers show that part of the Zika genomic RNA "folds up" into a complex structure that interacts with and blocks a powerful cellular enzyme that normally destroys RNA, and the researchers used an advanced technique called x-ray crystallography to solve the structure of this folded-up RNA segment. By altering the Zika virus genomic RNA, the team was able to disrupt this structure and eliminate the production of the potentially disease-causing small RNAs. Jeffrey Kieft, PhD, professor of biochemistry and molecular genetics, led a team that consisted of scientists at the University of Colorado School of Medicine (Aurora, CO), the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley, CA), and the University of Texas Medical Branch (Galveston, TX). He is the corresponding author of the article, published in the journal Science. Benjamin Akiyama, PhD, a member of Dr. Kieft's Lab, was the lead author on the study. "The first step is stopping any process that causes disease is to understand that process in detail, preferably at the molecular level." said Dr. Kieft, who is also a member of the University of Colorado RNA BioScience Initiative. "Based on what we knew about related viruses, there was reason to suspect that Zika virus infection would result in potentially disease-causing RNAs, but we couldn't be sure. Now, having observed them and the molecular structures involved, we can ask new questions about the fundamental molecular processes Zika uses to take over a cell and cause disease." The findings could also inform ongoing efforts to develop a vaccine or other anti-Zika therapeutics. Also, because Zika is closely related to other dangerous viruses such as Dengue, West Nile, Japanese Encephalitis and Yellow Fever, the discoveries may be broadly applicable to understanding these viruses and may help in efforts to stop them. About the University of Colorado School of Medicine Faculty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine work to advance science and improve care. These faculty members include physicians, educators and scientists at University of Colorado Health, Children's Hospital Colorado, Denver Health, National Jewish Health, and the Denver Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The school is located on the Anschutz Medical Campus, one of four campuses in the University of Colorado system.


Matthes T.,University of Geneva | McKee T.,Medicine Faculty | Dunand-Sauthier I.,Medicine Faculty | Manfroi B.,Joseph Fourier University | And 4 more authors.
Leukemia | Year: 2015

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a non-curable tumor developing in the bone marrow (BM). The BM microenvironment rich in hematopoietic precursors is suspected to have a role in MM development. Here we show that a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) mediated in vivo MM promotion. In MM-infiltrated BM, APRIL originated from differentiating myeloid cells with an expression peak in precursor cells. Notably, APRIL expression stayed stable in BM despite MM infiltration. The pool of APRIL-producing cells changed upon MM infiltration. Although CD16 + mature myeloid cells constituted about half of the APRIL-producing cells in healthy BM, CD16 - Elastase + myeloid precursor cells were predominant in MM-infiltrated BM. Myeloid precursor cells secreted all the APRIL they produced, and binding of secreted APRIL to MM cells, strictly dependent of heparan sulfate carried by CD138, resulted in an in situ internalization by tumor cells. This indicated APRIL consumption by MM in BM. Taken together, our data show that myelopoiesis dysregulation characterized by an increased proportion of precursor cells occurs in MM patients. Such dysregulation correlates with a stable expression of the MM-promoting factor APRIL in infiltrated BM. © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.


PubMed | Medicine Faculty, University Hospital, University of Geneva, Joseph Fourier University and University of Basel
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Leukemia | Year: 2015

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a non-curable tumor developing in the bone marrow (BM). The BM microenvironment rich in hematopoietic precursors is suspected to have a role in MM development. Here we show that a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) mediated in vivo MM promotion. In MM-infiltrated BM, APRIL originated from differentiating myeloid cells with an expression peak in precursor cells. Notably, APRIL expression stayed stable in BM despite MM infiltration. The pool of APRIL-producing cells changed upon MM infiltration. Although CD16(+) mature myeloid cells constituted about half of the APRIL-producing cells in healthy BM, CD16(-) Elastase(+) myeloid precursor cells were predominant in MM-infiltrated BM. Myeloid precursor cells secreted all the APRIL they produced, and binding of secreted APRIL to MM cells, strictly dependent of heparan sulfate carried by CD138, resulted in an in situ internalization by tumor cells. This indicated APRIL consumption by MM in BM. Taken together, our data show that myelopoiesis dysregulation characterized by an increased proportion of precursor cells occurs in MM patients. Such dysregulation correlates with a stable expression of the MM-promoting factor APRIL in infiltrated BM.


Selma W.B.,University of Sousse | Harizi H.,University of Bordeaux Segalen | Bougmiza I.,Medicine Faculty | Hannachi N.,University of Sousse | And 3 more authors.
DNA and Cell Biology | Year: 2011

Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) is a key cytokine involved mainly in the defense against intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Given its key role in the control of tuberculosis (TB), in the present article we have investigated a possible association between IFN-γ gene single-nucleotide polymorphism linked to high and low producer phenotypes (IFN-γ [+874Thigh→Alow]) (rs2430561) and risk development of active TB in Tunisian patients. Genomic DNA samples were obtained from 223 patients with active TB (168 pulmonary and 55 extrapulmonary cases) and 150 healthy blood donors. Genotypes were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. The +874 AA genotype (low IFN-γ producer) was significantly associated with increased risk of developing of active pulmonary TB (odds ratio [OR]2.18; 95% confidence intervals [CI], 1.33-3.57; P corrected for the number of genotypes [Pc]0.003). By contrast, the AT genotype was found to be significantly associated with resistance to pulmonary TB (OR0.46; 95% CI, 0.28-0.74; Pc0.0018) and extrapulmonary TB development (OR0.46; 95% CI, 0.23-0.91; Pc0.045). Collectively, our data showed that the IFN-γ +874T/A polymorphism is a determinant in the resistance or susceptibility to the development of active TB in the studied population. © 2011 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


PubMed | Medicine Faculty and Federal University of Ceará
Type: Clinical Study | Journal: Acta cirurgica brasileira | Year: 2015

To assess the safety and potential equivalence of the use of hemosiderin compared to the Technetium-99 in sentinel lymph node biopsy in human breast cancer.Non-random sample of 14 volunteer women diagnosed with breast cancer with primary tumors (T1/T2) and clinically tumor-free axilla were submitted to the identification of sentinel lymph node using hemosiderin obtained from autologous blood injected in the periareolar region 24h before surgery on an outpatient basis. Patients received preoperative subareolar intradermal injection of Technetium-99 in the immediate preoperative period. Patients were submitted to sentinel lymph node biopsy, with incision in the axillary fold guided by Gamma-Probe, dissection by planes until the identification of the point of maximum uptake of Technetium-99, identifying the marked nodes and their colors. All surgical specimens were sent for pathological and immunohistochemical study.The results showed no evidence of side effects and/or allergic and non-allergic reactions in patients submitted to SLNB with hemosiderin. The SLN identification rate per patient was 100%. SLNB identification rate per patient with hemosiderin was the same as that of Technetium, with a concordance rate of 100% between the methods.Hemosiderin is a safe dye that is equivalent to Technetium in breast sentinel lymph node biopsy.

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