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Medicine and, Japan

Irie S.,Medicine and Welfare | Hayashida N.,Medicine and Welfare | Shinkawa T.,Medicine and Welfare | Shinkawa T.,Nagasaki University | And 7 more authors.
Life Science Journal | Year: 2014

Objective: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprises a wide spectrum of liver injuries, ranging from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). In clinical practice, there is so far no method of differentiating reliably between simple steatosis and steatohepatitis solely on the basis of non-invasive diagnostic tests. Thus, the development of a conventional screening method for NAFLD is definitely needed for its effective and early diagnosis. The aim of this study is to clarify the capability of 18F-FDG PET/CT for the screening of NAFLD. Methods: We explored the relationship among liver images on FDG-PET/CT screening, individual information, and laboratory findings from 123 Japanese male. Images of FDG-PET/CT were assigned according to the pattern of FDG uptake, i.e., "homogenous pattern" and "heterogenous pattern". Differences in hematological and laboratory values between the homogenous pattern group and the heterogenous pattern group were statistically evaluated. Results: Body mass index, diastolic blood pressure, and mean blood pressure were significantly higher in the heterogeneous pattern group than in the homogeneous pattern group. Also, log aspartate aminotransferase, log alanine aminotransferase, and log gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase values were significantly higher in the heterogeneous pattern group than in the homogeneous pattern group. Furthermore, hemoglobin, log triglyceride, uric acid, and blood glucose were significantly higher in the heterogeneous pattern group than in the homogeneous pattern group. High-density-lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly higher in the homogeneous pattern group than in the heterogeneous pattern group. Discussion: Heterogeneous 18F-FDG uptake on PET/CT images of the liver may represent the findings of NAFLD. Source

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