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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

DIJON, FRANCE, May 09, 2017-- Richard Decreau has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.An esteemed chemistry professor born in St. Germain-en-Laye, France, Dr. Decreau is perhaps most noted for his discoveries in the field of Cerenkov luminescence imaging and his substantial contribution to biomimetic chemistry. He started his career by obtaining a Ph.D. in chemistry from Aix-Marseille University in 1998, and went on to complete postdoctoral research at University College London and Stanford University in California. Since 2005, Dr. Decreau has served as a research associate and laboratory manager at Stanford University. He has also studied and taught chemistry at the University of Burgundy Franche Comte.In addition to serving his field in an academic capacity, Dr. Decreau is a reviewer of scientific manuscripts for the Royal Society of Chemistry, the American Chemical Society, Wiley Journals, and Elsevier Journals. He has written and contributed numerous articles to professional journals as well. To stay connected to his field, he maintains affiliation with organizations like the Society of Porphyrins & Phthalocyanines, the French Medicinal Chemistry Society, and the American Chemical Society.Dr. Decreau has received formal honors over the course of his career. These include receiving the CNRS Chair of Excellence in 2010 and earning the Lavoisier Fellowship. His accomplishments have been highlighted in the 32nd and 33rd editions of Who's Who in the World. Outside of his profession, Dr. Decreau's hobbies include astrobiology and history. He and his wife, Marie-Estelle, have two children.About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

BUFFALO, NY, May 11, 2017-- Michelle Linder has been included in Marquis Who's Who. As in all Marquis Who's Who biographical volumes, individuals profiled are selected on the basis of current reference value. Factors such as position, noteworthy accomplishments, visibility, and prominence in a field are all taken into account during the selection process.Michelle Linder is a graduate research assistant at the State University of New York at Buffalo, where she is pursuing a Ph.D. in medicinal chemistry. Her current research focuses on the synthesis and use of various heavy chalcogen-containing rhodamine dyes as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy, extracorporeal photopheresis, and dye-sensitized solar cells. Ms. Linder has been a graduate research assistant since 2012. From 2012 to 2015, she was also a teaching assistant at the school. Ms. Linder graduated summa cum laude from SUNY Oneonta in 2012 with a Bachelor of Science in chemistry. In 2010, she earned an advanced tutor certification through the College Reading and Learning Association.Ms. Linder has utilized her knowledge and research to co-author a number of publications in the past few years. These include "Luminescence spectroscopy of chalcogen substituted rhodamine cations in vacuo," published in Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences in 2017, "Targeting T Cell Bioenergetics by Modulating P-Glycoprotein Selectivity Depletes Alloreactive T Cells to Prevent Graft-Versus-Host Disease," published in the Journal of Immunology in 2016, "Extended Rhodamine Photosensitizers for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer Cells," published in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry in 2016, and "Selective Photodepletion of Malignant T Cells in Extracorporeal Photopheresis with Selenorhodamine Photosensitizers," also published in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry in 2016. She is also a co-author of "Selenorhodamine Photosensitizers with the Texas-red Core for Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer Cells," published in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry in 2015, "Selenorhodamine Photosensitizers for Photodynamic Therapy of P-Glycoprotein-Expressing Cancer Cells," published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry in 2014, and "Synthesis and Properties of Heavy Chalcogen Analogues of the Texas Reds and Related Rhodamines," published in Organometallics in 2014.A member of the Omicron Delta Kappa National Honor Society, Ms. Linder also remains active with the American Chemical Society. She has received numerous awards and honors over the years in light of her effort and achievements in the field of chemistry. Most recently, Ms. Linder received the Graduate Student Excellence in Teaching Award from the University of Buffalo's Graduate School. She is also a recipient of the Speyer Fellowship, the Jere Solo Fellowship, the Presidential Fellowship, and the Gordon Harris Fellowship from the University at Buffalo's Department of Chemistry. In 2014, she was honored with the department's Mattern-Tyler Teaching Award as well. In 2012, Ms. Linder received the SUNY Chancellor's Award, as well as an Academic Achievement Award in chemistry and biochemistry from the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at SUNY Oneonta. She was bestowed the Joseph Breen Memorial Fellowship from the American Chemical Society's Green Chemistry Institute in 2011. Ms. Linder aims for continued achievements in the field of chemistry as she moves forward in her career.For more information about Ms. Linder, please visit https://www.linkedin.com/in/michelleklinder About Marquis Who's Who :Since 1899, when A. N. Marquis printed the First Edition of Who's Who in America , Marquis Who's Who has chronicled the lives of the most accomplished individuals and innovators from every significant field of endeavor, including politics, business, medicine, law, education, art, religion and entertainment. Today, Who's Who in America remains an essential biographical source for thousands of researchers, journalists, librarians and executive search firms around the world. Marquis now publishes many Who's Who titles, including Who's Who in America , Who's Who in the World , Who's Who in American Law , Who's Who in Medicine and Healthcare , Who's Who in Science and Engineering , and Who's Who in Asia . Marquis publications may be visited at the official Marquis Who's Who website at www.marquiswhoswho.com


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

SEATTLE, WA--(Marketwired - May 16, 2017) - CFN Media Group ("CFN Media"), the leading agency and digital media network dedicated to legal cannabis, today announced publication of an article covering ABcann Global Corp. (TSX VENTURE: ABCN) following its going-public transaction. There are about 40 licensed producers that have received approval from Health Canada to cultivate and sell medical cannabis to consumers. The largest company in the space is Canopy Growth Corp., which has become the first cannabis 'unicorn' with a valuation that's well over C$1 billion. Many other licensed producers are close to achieving these kinds of valuations as they ramp up production and revenue. ABcann Global is priced significantly lower by comparison with a market capitalization of about C$85 million, despite being one of the first licensed producers approved by Health Canada in 2014. The company hasn't scaled up its production as quickly as other LPs, but it has signed high-profile partnerships with companies like Syqe Medical Inc. -- the innovator behind the first metered dosage inhaler -- and developed some of the highest yields in the industry. In addition, the company has the cash on hand to significantly expand its capacity over the near-term. Management anticipates that its Van Luven facility will double its capacity, to about 29,000 square feet, this year while the Kimmet facility will come online next year with a 150,000 square foot presence. ABcann Global has an experienced management team that's well-positioned to execute on plans to become a leader in the space. Chairman Ken Clement has developed a strong rapport with Health Canada and cultivated several strategic partnerships around the world. His goal of standardizing production and doses of cannabinoids has help shaped the company's unique focus relative to other licensed producers that are focused on simply maximizing production of commoditized products that will eventually be hard to compete against as the market grows. CEO Aaron Keay has over 10 years of experience across many different sectors, serving in corporate finance, senior management, and board member roles. With a history of raising over $250 million, Mr. Keay is well-positioned to help the company secure funding and grow. Mr. Keay is also joined by a seasoned executive management team with experience across areas of management, finance, and the operation of cannabis businesses. Finally, the company has developed a solid board of advisors that includes the 'father of cannabis', Dr. Raphael Mechoulam, Ph.D. Dr. Mechoulam is an organic chemist and professor of Medicinal Chemistry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He's best known for being the first scientist to isolate tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and then cannabidiol (CBD) in 1963. Dr. Mechoulam is joined by many other prominent researchers and scientists in the field. Canada's cannabis industry could be worth between $12.7 billion and $22.6 billion by 2020, according to Deloitte Canada, eclipsing the combined sales of beer, wine, and spirits. The country is widely expected to implement recreational legalization by early next year, which could open the market significantly beyond the medical users that are currently served under the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations -- or ACMPR. PI Financial believes that there could be a shortfall in supply with only about 40 companies licensed by Health Canada to grow and sell the drug. According to a recent report, the analyst reckons that LPs would need to cultivate a total of 610,000 kilograms to fulfill domestic and export demand by 2019. The problem is that existing capacity would fall short and lead to a 200,000 kilogram shortfall and it could be difficult to onboard enough new LPs. Please follow the link to read the full article: http://www.cannabisfn.com/abcann-compelling-value-going-public/ Learn how to become a CFN Media featured company, brand or entrepreneur: http://www.cannabisfn.com/become-featured-company/ Download the CFN Media iOS mobile app to access the world of cannabis from your smart phone: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cannabisfn/id988009247?ls=1&mt=8 Or visit our homepage and enter your mobile number under the Apple App Store logo to receive a download link text on your iPhone: http://www.cannabisfn.com About CFN Media CFN Media (CannabisFN) is the leading creative agency and media network dedicated to legal cannabis. We help marijuana businesses attract investors, customers (B2B, B2C), capital, and media visibility. Private and public marijuana companies and brands in the US and Canada rely on CFN Media to grow and succeed. Disclaimer: Except for the historical information presented herein, matters discussed in this release contain forward-looking statements that are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such statements. Emerging Growth LLC, which owns CFN Media and CannabisFN.com, is not registered with any financial or securities regulatory authority, and does not provide nor claims to provide investment advice or recommendations to readers of this release. Emerging Growth LLC may from time to time have a position in the securities mentioned herein and may increase or decrease such positions without notice. For making specific investment decisions, readers should seek their own advice. Emerging Growth LLC may be compensated for its services in the form of cash-based compensation or equity securities in the companies it writes about, or a combination of the two. For full disclosure please visit: http://www.cannabisfn.com/legal-disclaimer/.


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Research led by the University of Adelaide is paving the way for safer and more effective drugs to treat type 2 diabetes, reducing side effects and the need for insulin injections. Two studies, published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry and BBA-General Subjects, have shown for the first time how new potential anti-diabetic drugs interact with their target in the body at the molecular level. These new potential drugs have a completely different action than the most commonly prescribed anti-diabetic, Metformin, which acts on the liver to reduce glucose production, and are potentially more efficient at reducing blood sugar. They target a protein receptor known as PPARgamma found in fat tissue throughout the body, either fully or partially activating it in order to lower blood sugar by increasing sensitivity to insulin and changing the metabolism of fat and sugar. "Type two diabetes is characterised by resistance to insulin with subsequent high blood sugar which leads to serious disease. It is usually associated with poor lifestyle factors such as diet and lack of exercise," says lead researcher Dr John Bruning, with the University's School of Biological Sciences and Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing. "Prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Australia alone has more than tripled since 1990, with an estimated cost of $6 billion a year. The development of safe and more efficient therapeutics is therefore becoming increasingly important. "People with severe diabetes need to take insulin but having to inject this can be problematic, and it's difficult to get insulin levels just right. It's highly desirable for people to come off insulin injections and instead use oral therapeutics." The first study, in collaboration with The Scripps Research Institute in Florida, US, describes an honours research project by Rebecca Frkic, where 14 different versions of a drug which partially activates PPARgamma were produced. Partial activation can have the benefit of fewer side-effects than full activation. The original drug, INT131, is currently being tested in clinical trials in the US but some of the versions produced at the University of Adelaide have increased potency compared to the original, with the potential to further improve the treatment of type 2 diabetes. "A major finding of this study was being able to show which regions of the drug are most important for interacting with the PPARgamma receptor," says Dr Bruning. "This means we now have the information to design modified drugs which will work even more efficiently." The second study, in collaboration with Flinders University, used X-ray crystallography to demonstrate for the first time exactly how a potential new drug, rivoglitazone, binds with the PPARgamma receptor. Rivoglitazone fully activates PPARgamma but has less side effects than others with this mode of action. "Showing how this compound interacts with its target is a key step towards being able to design new therapeutics with higher efficiencies and less side-effects," says lead author Dr Rajapaksha, from Flinders University School of Medicine (now at La Trobe University). "Lack of structural information was hampering determination of the precise mechanisms involved."


BISHOP’S STORTFORD, England--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Dotmatics, a leading provider of scientific informatics solutions and services to the life sciences industry, today announces that Domainex, a small-molecule therapeutics company that provides integrated drug research services to global pharmaceutical, biotechnology and academic partners, has signed a multi-year agreement. Domainex will leverage Dotmatics’ software to analyse and share valuable scientific data across the full range of its offerings, from protein expression through to pre-clinical candidate delivery. Specifically, Domainex will use several key bioinformatics solutions from the Dotmatics 5.0 suite including Browser, Studies, Vortex, Studies Notebook, Register, Inventory, Cascade, Elemental and Biologics Inventory. This state-of-the-art software will be used to provide seamless interconnectivity of biological and chemical competences, to minimise cycle timelines and providing its clients with a more efficient service. “It is great knowing that our investment in the Dotmatics software platform will directly benefit our clients by creating a visual interface capturing data and enabling project decision making in a just-in-time manner,” said Tom Mander, Domainex COO. “It brings together the innovative and high quality protein expression, hit generation and medicinal chemistry services we offer. This agreement is a natural development of our collaborative working relationships, and we are confident that our two companies will continue to work together in a very positive way for the benefit of our clients.” “Domainex selected Dotmatics because their software is a unique and comprehensive fit with our Biology and Chemistry requirements including the reproduction of assay workflows, data reporting and visualization, and the adoption of electronic lab notebooks,” said Trevor Perrior, Domainex CSO. “We have a history of successfully working with Dotmatics and their ability to integrate seamlessly with our existing systems while providing in-depth, scientifically-advanced software made them the clear choice.” “It is great knowing that our software will help advance Domainex’s innovate work in COPD drug research, epigenetics research, medicinal and computational chemistry services, protein expression and cell based and biochemical assay development offerings,” said Dotmatics’ Chief Executive Officer Steve Gallagher, PhD. “This agreement is a natural progression of our working relationship and we are confident that our two companies will continue on a very positive path.” To learn more about the Dotmatics and Domainex partnership, please visit https://www.dotmatics.com/. Japan-based customers are encouraged to attend the Dotmatics User Group Meeting in Tokyo, May 17th or Osaka on May 19th where Domainex’s Ray Boffey, Group Leader, Medicinal Chemistry, will be speaking about a CRO’s perspective of Dotmatics Implementation. Established in 2001 as a spin-out from University College London, Birkbeck College, and the Institute of Cancer Research, Domainex Ltd. is a Cambridge-based, privately-owned small-molecule therapeutics company that provides integrated drug research services to global pharmaceutical, biotechnology and academic partners. Services cover a wide span of the drug research value chain, from disease target selection to pre-clinical candidate nomination. Domainex's services include recombinant protein expression and use of its proprietary technology platform, Combinatorial Domain Hunting to identify soluble protein fragments for structural biology and assay development. Hit finding activities encompass assay development and screening utilising its BioassayBuilder, FragmentBuilder and LeadBuilder platforms. The core of the service offering is undertaking multi-parameter medicinal chemistry optimisation of hits and leads under the mantra ‘every compound counts’, which can save up to 30% on the average industry time from target to candidate. For more information, please visit www.domainex.co.uk. Dotmatics is a leading global scientific informatics software and services provider, delivering solutions tailored to the modern, highly collaborative and mobile scientific environments. The company provides solutions to several vertical markets, including the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, academia, food and beverage, oil and gas and agrochemical industries. Dotmatics’ enterprise solutions are flexible, scalable and configurable, providing effective scientific information management across entire organisations, from discovery research to development and early manufacturing. Dotmatics has significant expertise in scientific informatics, including database management for chemistry and biologics, electronic laboratory notebooks, chemical and biological registration, screening data management, SAR analysis, reporting, and visualisation. Dotmatics solutions are available for local or cloud deployment and supported on Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X and Linux. For more information, visit www.dotmatics.com.


Today, results from a post hoc analysis of data from the SCALE Maintenance trial were presented at the 24th European Congress on Obesity (ECO) 2017. In the trial, adults who lost at least 5% of their initial weight during a low- calorie run-in period were randomised to receive Saxenda® (liraglutide 3 mg) or placebo. After 16 weeks of treatment with Saxenda®, participants who lost an additional 5% or more of their body weight (defined as 'early responders') were more likely to maintain weight loss and achieve greater additional weight loss over 56 weeks, compared with people losing less than 5% body weight after 16 weeks of Saxenda® treatment ('early non-responders').[1] "In the obesity specialist setting, low-calorie diets combined with increased physical activity are commonly used to induce an initial weight loss in people with obesity. However, when the initial weight loss reaches a plateau and patients enter the 'weight maintenance phase' with less stringent caloric restriction, we often see that many experience weight regain," said Dr Sean Wharton, medical director at the Wharton Medical Clinic, Ontario and SCALE clinical trial investigator. "As a consequence, pharmacotherapy can be used to help people with obesity in maintaining the weight loss that has already been achieved by a low-calorie diet and increased physical activity. These data are very encouraging to clinicians in this specialist setting, because they show that early responders to Saxenda® are able to both maintain and achieve additional weight loss." Of those who completed 56 weeks of treatment with Saxenda®, 68% were early responders to Saxenda® at week 16 and 32% were early non-responders. In addition to weight loss achieved during the run-in period, early responders experienced 9.9% weight loss, compared with 0.0% in early non-responders at 56 weeks.[1] Following 56 weeks of treatment, 91.7% of early responders and 47.1% of early non-responders, had maintained or lost additional weight following the run-in period. No early responders regained their run-in weight loss over 56 weeks of treatment with Saxenda®, compared with 3.9% of early non-responders.[1] There were similar incidences of total adverse events in early responders (92.7%) and early non-responders (91.0%). Gastrointestinal adverse events were more frequent in early responders compared with early non-responders (78.9% vs 62.7%).[1] Saxenda® was generally well-tolerated, with observed side effects in line with previous trials.[2] Obesity is a disease[3],[4] that requires long-term management. It is associated with many serious health consequences and decreased life expectancy.[5],[6] Obesity-related comorbidities include type 2 diabetes, heart disease, obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and certain types of cancer.[5],[7],[8] It is a complex and multi-factorial disease that is influenced by physiological, psychological, environmental, socio-economic and genetic factors.[9] The global increase in the prevalence of obesity is a public health issue that has severe cost implications to healthcare systems. In 2014, 13% of adults, or approximately 600 million adults, were living with obesity.[10] Saxenda® (liraglutide 3 mg) is a once-daily glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue with 97% similarity to naturally occurring human GLP-1,[2] a hormone that is released in response to food intake.[11] Like human GLP-1, Saxenda® regulates appetite by increasing feelings of fullness and satiety, while lowering feelings of hunger and prospective food consumption, thereby leading to reduced food intake. As with other GLP-1 receptor agonists, Saxenda® stimulates insulin secretion and lowers glucagon secretion in a glucose-dependent manner.[2] Saxenda® was evaluated in the SCALE (Satiety and Clinical Adiposity - Liraglutide Evidence) phase 3a clinical trial programme. In the EU, Saxenda® is indicated as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity for weight management in adult patients with an initial BMI of ≥30 kg/m2 (obese), or ≥27 kg/m2 to <30 kg/m2 (overweight) in the presence of at least one weight-related comorbidity such as dysglycaemia (prediabetes or type 2 diabetes mellitus), hypertension, dyslipidaemia or obstructive sleep apnoea.[2] Guidance is given in the label that treatment with Saxenda® should be discontinued after 12 weeks on the liraglutide 3.0 mg/day dose, if patients have not lost at least 5% of their initial body weight.[2] In the SCALE Maintenance clinical trial, adults with obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) or who were overweight (BMI ≥27 kg/m2 to <30 kg/m2) with comorbidities (dyslipidaemia and/or hypertension), who lost at least 5% of their initial weight during a low-calorie diet (1200-1400 kcal/day) run-in period, were randomised to receive Saxenda® (n=212) or placebo (n=210) for 56 weeks, both as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity.[1] Novo Nordisk's phase 3 development programme, called SCALE, investigated liraglutide 3 mg for weight management. The SCALE clinical development programme consisted of four, placebo-controlled, multinational trials called: SCALE Obesity and Prediabetes, SCALE Diabetes, SCALE Sleep Apnoea and SCALE Maintenance.[12-16] Novo Nordisk is a global healthcare company with more than 90 years of innovation and leadership in diabetes care. This heritage has given us experience and capabilities that also enable us to help people defeat other serious chronic conditions: haemophilia, growth disorders and obesity. Headquartered in Denmark, Novo Nordisk employs approximately 42,000 people in 77 countries and markets its products in more than 165 countries. For more information, visit novonordisk.com, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube 1. Wharton S, Jacobsen P, Arrone L. Early responders to liraglutide 3.0 mg as adjunct to diet and exercise from the SCALE Maintenance trial. Oral presentation number RS3:3. ECO. 2017. 2. EMA. Saxenda® (liraglutide 3 mg) summary of product characteristics. Available at: http://www.ema.europa.eu/docs/en_GB/document_library/EPAR_-_Product_Information/human/003780/WC500185786.pdf Last accessed: May 2017. 3. American Medical Association. A.M.A Adopts New Policies on Second Day of Voting at Annual Meeting. Obesity as a Disease. Available at: http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/news/news/2013/2013-06-18-new-ama-policies-annual-meeting.page Last accessed: May 2017. 4. WHO. Obesity: Preventing and managing the global epidemic. Available at: http://www.who.int/iris/handle/10665/42330 Last accessed: May 2017. 5. Guh DP, Zhang W, Bansback N, et al. The incidence of co-morbidities related to obesity and overweight: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Public Health. 2009; 25:88. 6. Peeters A, Barendregt JJ, Willekens F, et al. Obesity in adulthood and its consequences for life expectancy: a life-table analysis. Annals of Internal Medicine. 2003; 138:24-32. 7. Gami AS, Caples SM, Somers VK. Obesity and obstructive sleep apnea. Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America. 2003; 32:869-894. 8. Whitlock G, Lewington S, Sherliker P, et al. Body-mass index and cause-specific mortality in 900 000 adults: collaborative analyses of 57 prospective studies. Lancet. 2009; 373:1083-1096. 10. WHO. Obesity and Overweight Factsheet no. 311. Available at: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs311/en/ Last accessed: May 2017. 11. Knudsen LB, Nielsen PF, Huusfeldt PO, et al. Potent derivatives of glucagon-like peptide-1 with pharmacokinetic properties suitable for once daily administration. Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. 2000; 43:1664-1669. 12. Blackman A, Foster G, Zammit G, et al. Effect of liraglutide 3.0 mg in individuals with obesity and moderate or severe obstructive sleep apnea: The SCALE Sleep Apnea randomized clinical trial. International Journal of Obesity. 2016; 40:1310-1319. 13. Davies MJ, Bergenstal R, Bode B, et al. Efficacy of liraglutide for weight loss among patients with type 2 diabetes: The SCALE diabetes randomized clinical trial. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2015; 314:687-699. 14. Pi-Sunyer X, Astrup A, Fujioka K, et al. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of 3.0 mg of Liraglutide in Weight Management. N Engl J Med. 2015; 373:11-22. 15. le Roux C, Astrup A, Fujioka K, et al. 3 years of liraglutide versus placebo for type 2 diabetes risk reduction and weight management in individuals with prediabetes: a randomised, double-blind trial. The Lancet. 2017; (published online Feb 22.) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(17)30069-7. 16. Wadden TA, Hollander P, Klein S, et al. Weight maintenance and additional weight loss with liraglutide after low-calorie-diet-induced weight loss: The SCALE Maintenance randomized study. International Journal of Obesity. 2013; 37:1443-1451.


Today, results from a post hoc analysis of data from the SCALE Maintenance trial were presented at the 24th European Congress on Obesity (ECO) 2017. In the trial, adults who lost at least 5% of their initial weight during a low- calorie run-in period were randomised to receive Saxenda® (liraglutide 3 mg) or placebo. After 16 weeks of treatment with Saxenda®, participants who lost an additional 5% or more of their body weight (defined as 'early responders') were more likely to maintain weight loss and achieve greater additional weight loss over 56 weeks, compared with people losing less than 5% body weight after 16 weeks of Saxenda® treatment ('early non-responders').[1] "In the obesity specialist setting, low-calorie diets combined with increased physical activity are commonly used to induce an initial weight loss in people with obesity. However, when the initial weight loss reaches a plateau and patients enter the 'weight maintenance phase' with less stringent caloric restriction, we often see that many experience weight regain," said Dr Sean Wharton, medical director at the Wharton Medical Clinic, Ontario and SCALE clinical trial investigator. "As a consequence, pharmacotherapy can be used to help people with obesity in maintaining the weight loss that has already been achieved by a low-calorie diet and increased physical activity. These data are very encouraging to clinicians in this specialist setting, because they show that early responders to Saxenda® are able to both maintain and achieve additional weight loss." Of those who completed 56 weeks of treatment with Saxenda®, 68% were early responders to Saxenda® at week 16 and 32% were early non-responders. In addition to weight loss achieved during the run-in period, early responders experienced 9.9% weight loss, compared with 0.0% in early non-responders at 56 weeks.[1] Following 56 weeks of treatment, 91.7% of early responders and 47.1% of early non-responders, had maintained or lost additional weight following the run-in period. No early responders regained their run-in weight loss over 56 weeks of treatment with Saxenda®, compared with 3.9% of early non-responders.[1] There were similar incidences of total adverse events in early responders (92.7%) and early non-responders (91.0%). Gastrointestinal adverse events were more frequent in early responders compared with early non-responders (78.9% vs 62.7%).[1] Saxenda® was generally well-tolerated, with observed side effects in line with previous trials.[2] Obesity is a disease[3],[4]that requires long-term management. It is associated with many serious health consequences and decreased life expectancy.[5],[6] Obesity-related comorbidities include type 2 diabetes, heart disease, obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and certain types of cancer.[5],[7],[8]It is a complex and multi-factorial disease that is influenced by physiological, psychological, environmental, socio-economic and genetic factors.[9] The global increase in the prevalence of obesity is a public health issue that has severe cost implications to healthcare systems. In 2014, 13% of adults, or approximately 600 million adults, were living with obesity.[10] Saxenda® (liraglutide 3 mg) is a once-daily glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue with 97% similarity to naturally occurring human GLP-1,[2] a hormone that is released in response to food intake.[11] Like human GLP-1, Saxenda® regulates appetite by increasing feelings of fullness and satiety, while lowering feelings of hunger and prospective food consumption, thereby leading to reduced food intake. As with other GLP-1 receptor agonists, Saxenda® stimulates insulin secretion and lowers glucagon secretion in a glucose-dependent manner.[2] Saxenda® was evaluated in the SCALE (Satiety and Clinical Adiposity - Liraglutide Evidence) phase 3a clinical trial programme. In the EU, Saxenda® is indicated as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity for weight management in adult patients with an initial BMI of ≥30 kg/m2 (obese), or ≥27 kg/m2 to <30 kg/m2 (overweight) in the presence of at least one weight-related comorbidity such as dysglycaemia (prediabetes or type 2 diabetes mellitus), hypertension, dyslipidaemia or obstructive sleep apnoea.[2] Guidance is given in the label that treatment with Saxenda® should be discontinued after 12 weeks on the liraglutide 3.0 mg/day dose, if patients have not lost at least 5% of their initial body weight.[2] In the SCALE Maintenance clinical trial, adults with obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m2) or who were overweight (BMI ≥27 kg/m2 to <30 kg/m2) with comorbidities (dyslipidaemia and/or hypertension), who lost at least 5% of their initial weight during a low-calorie diet (1200-1400 kcal/day) run-in period, were randomised to receive Saxenda® (n=212) or placebo (n=210) for 56 weeks, both as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity.[1] Novo Nordisk's phase 3 development programme, called SCALE, investigated liraglutide 3 mg for weight management. The SCALE clinical development programme consisted of four, placebo-controlled, multinational trials called: SCALE Obesity and Prediabetes, SCALE Diabetes, SCALE Sleep Apnoea and SCALE Maintenance.[12-16] Novo Nordisk is a global healthcare company with more than 90 years of innovation and leadership in diabetes care. This heritage has given us experience and capabilities that also enable us to help people defeat other serious chronic conditions: haemophilia, growth disorders and obesity. Headquartered in Denmark, Novo Nordisk employs approximately 42,000 people in 77 countries and markets its products in more than 165 countries. For more information, visit novonordisk.com, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube 1. Wharton S, Jacobsen P, Arrone L. Early responders to liraglutide 3.0 mg as adjunct to diet and exercise from the SCALE Maintenance trial. Oral presentation number RS3:3. ECO. 2017. 2. EMA. Saxenda® (liraglutide 3 mg) summary of product characteristics. Available at: http://www.ema.europa.eu/docs/en_GB/document_library/EPAR_-_Product_Information/human/003780/WC500185786.pdf Last accessed: May 2017. 3. American Medical Association. A.M.A Adopts New Policies on Second Day of Voting at Annual Meeting. Obesity as a Disease. Available at: http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/news/news/2013/2013-06-18-new-ama-policies-annual-meeting.page Last accessed: May 2017. 4. WHO. Obesity: Preventing and managing the global epidemic. Available at: http://www.who.int/iris/handle/10665/42330 Last accessed: May 2017. 5. Guh DP, Zhang W, Bansback N, et al. The incidence of co-morbidities related to obesity and overweight: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Public Health. 2009; 25:88. 6. Peeters A, Barendregt JJ, Willekens F, et al. Obesity in adulthood and its consequences for life expectancy: a life-table analysis. Annals of Internal Medicine. 2003; 138:24-32. 7. Gami AS, Caples SM, Somers VK. Obesity and obstructive sleep apnea. Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America. 2003; 32:869-894. 8. Whitlock G, Lewington S, Sherliker P, et al. Body-mass index and cause-specific mortality in 900 000 adults: collaborative analyses of 57 prospective studies. Lancet. 2009; 373:1083-1096. 10. WHO. Obesity and Overweight Factsheet no. 311. Available at: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs311/en/ Last accessed: May 2017. 11. Knudsen LB, Nielsen PF, Huusfeldt PO, et al. Potent derivatives of glucagon-like peptide-1 with pharmacokinetic properties suitable for once daily administration. Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. 2000; 43:1664-1669. 12. Blackman A, Foster G, Zammit G, et al. Effect of liraglutide 3.0 mg in individuals with obesity and moderate or severe obstructive sleep apnea: The SCALE Sleep Apnea randomized clinical trial. International Journal of Obesity. 2016; 40:1310-1319. 13. Davies MJ, Bergenstal R, Bode B, et al. Efficacy of liraglutide for weight loss among patients with type 2 diabetes: The SCALE diabetes randomized clinical trial. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2015; 314:687-699. 14. Pi-Sunyer X, Astrup A, Fujioka K, et al. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of 3.0 mg of Liraglutide in Weight Management. N Engl J Med. 2015; 373:11-22. 15. le Roux C, Astrup A, Fujioka K, et al. 3 years of liraglutide versus placebo for type 2 diabetes risk reduction and weight management in individuals with prediabetes: a randomised, double-blind trial. The Lancet. 2017; (published online Feb 22.) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(17)30069-7. 16. Wadden TA, Hollander P, Klein S, et al. Weight maintenance and additional weight loss with liraglutide after low-calorie-diet-induced weight loss: The SCALE Maintenance randomized study. International Journal of Obesity. 2013; 37:1443-1451.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

This article by Dr. Maria Digiacomo has been published in The Open Medicinal Chemistry Journal, Volume 11, 2017 Diabetes mellitus (DM) is probably one of the oldest known diseases and the incidence has been increasing steadily all over the world. This metabolic disease is characterized by chronic hyperglycemia due to defect in insulin secretion and/or insulin action. The etiopathology is very complex and is closely related with long-term damage, dysfunction, and failure of various organs, such as the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart, and blood vessels. Strong epidemiological evidence suggest a relationship between blood sugar levels and the onset of diabetes complications, in fact, excess glucose in the body leads to conversion of sugar into its corresponding alcohol, namely sorbitol, via the polyol pathway. The activation of this pathway is dependent on the enzyme aldose reductase (ARL2) and thus its inhibition should be prevented or delay the onset of both micro- and macrovascular complications such as retinopathy, peripheral vascular disease and coronary artery disease. Currently, only the carboxylic acid epalrestat, an aldose reductase inhibitor (ARI), is available on the market and used for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy in Japan, India and China. Many ARIs have shown to be clinically unsuccessful because of adverse pharmacokinetics or toxic side-effects. In this study, we described the design, synthesis and biological evaluation of three small series of spirobenzopyran acetic acid derivatives, proposed as a scaffold for novel ALR2 inhibitors. Most of the new ARIs proved to inhibit the target enzyme, showing IC50 values in the micromolar/low micromolar range, without affecting the activity of another important enzyme, namely ARL1, which plays a detoxifying role in metabolic processes involved in the physiological homeostasis. These results suggested that the spirobenzopyran scaffold represents a new and promising tool that could pave the way to the discovery of novel and effective ARIs. For more information about the article, please visit https:/ Reference: Digiacomo, M.; (2017). Synthesis and Functional Evaluation of Novel Aldose Reductase Inhibitors Bearing a Spirobenzopyran Scaffold. The Open Medicinal Chemistry Journal., DOI: 10.2174/1874104501711010009


TORONTO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Cerveau Technologies, Inc. today announced finalization of a clinical supply agreement with Merck, known as MSD outside the US and Canada, providing access to an investigational imaging agent being evaluated in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans for assessing the status and progression of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the brain. NFTs made up of aggregated tau protein are believed to provide a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease. As part of the agreement Cerveau will be responsible for providing access to MK-6240 at multiple sites globally to be used in Merck-specific research initiatives. Cerveau will be accelerating technology transfer and site qualification in over fifteen sites to provide access to support broad availability. “At Cerveau, we are focused on providing information and technologies to researchers and clinicians in order to improve brain health,” said Rick Hiatt, President and Chief Executive Officer of Cerveau Technologies, Inc. “We are excited by the opportunity to work with Merck and the pharmaceutical industry in providing access to this investigational imaging agent to the broader scientific community. We are rapidly establishing collaborations and agreements to improve processes in order to support multiple initiatives around the world.” “There is a critical need for new imaging agents that provide sensitive biomarkers to enable early diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases and allow for more appropriate staging of disease states, and measuring the effect of disease-modifying therapeutics,” said Cyrille Sur, Executive Director, Translational Imaging Biomarkers, Merck Research Laboratories. “Agreements such as this provide a platform to evaluate the potential of our novel Tau imaging agent.” In early studies published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Merck scientists reported that [18F]MK-6240 has a high specificity and selectivity for neurofibrillary tangles with favorable physicochemical properties and in vivo pharmacokinetics that warranted clinical investigation as a potential PET neuroimaging agent. Merck and Cerveau are currently conducting an open-label Phase 1 study to investigate the safety and efficacy of [18F]MK-6240 as a PET imaging agent for quantifying brain burden of neurofibrillary tangle pathology. For further information about the trial please go to clinical trials.gov (NCT02562989). Cerveau Technologies, Inc. is a partnership between Enigma Biomedical Group, Inc. and Sinotau Pharmaceutical Group. Cerveau's vision is to globally develop diagnostics and technology that will impact patients with neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease.


TORONTO, ON--(Marketwired - May 02, 2017) - In a live broadcast on Thursday, May 18, 2017, industry expert Dr. Sam Mann, Principal Scientist, Medicinal Chemistry from Charles River Laboratories will look at some of the complementary approaches to HTS from a chemist's perspective and how these strategies have been successfully applied to real drug discovery programs at Charles River for Charles River's partners. While high-throughput screening (HTS) remains a powerful weapon for hit identification, it is important to be aware of the many alternative tools available to the medicinal chemist for initiating a drug discovery program. No hit identification method is always fruitful; they all have their strengths and weaknesses, and only by judicious integration of hit identification approaches can the chances of success be maximized. For more information about this free webinar visit: Alternatives to HTS - Hit-finding Approaches in the Medicinal Chemist's Arsenal Xtalks, powered by Honeycomb Worldwide Inc., is a leading provider of educational webinars to the global Life Sciences community. Every year thousands of industry practitioners (from pharmaceutical & biotech companies, private & academic research institutions, healthcare centers, etc.) turn to Xtalks for access to quality content. Xtalks helps Life Science professionals stay current with industry developments, trends and regulations. Xtalks webinars also provide perspectives on key issues from top industry thought leaders and service providers. To learn more about Xtalks visit http://xtalks.com

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