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News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Tiny droplets of saliva can carry bacteria from the mouth to the lungs, a new study shows. That means bacteria are able to avoid the epiglottis, the movable tissue barrier that keeps most saliva from getting into the lower respiratory tract. By studying the DNA of these bacteria in the lungs of healthy volunteers, researchers confirmed that the population of microbes in the lungs closely resembles the population found in the mouth. And by studying the microbes’ distribution within the airways, the researchers could determine their most likely entry route. They found that many of the immigrant microbes make their home near the main carina, the spot at the end of the trachea where the airway branches off to the left and right lungs. This spot in the lungs is a “landing pad” where aspirated saliva—because of gravity and our upright posture—is likely to collide with the airway. But some bacteria manage to make it all the way to the deepest reaches of the pulmonary system and reside in the tiny air sacs called alveoli. Wherever the bacteria land, they join a community made up mostly of other recent immigrants. Few microbes are thought to be long-term residents of healthy lungs. Unlike the gut, healthy lungs are an inhospitable environment for bacteria, with little nutrition and constant surveillance by the immune system. “This is the most comprehensive topographic survey of the healthy lung microbiome to date. It adds to the evidence that healthy lungs are like an island whose population is determined by the balance of immigration and elimination of species: who moves in and who moves out,” says Robert P. Dickson, assistant professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan. “The microbiome of the lung plays by a different ecologic rulebook than the gut microbiome, and this study helps clarify what those rules are.” Inspired by classic models of ecology, researchers propose an “adapted island model” of the lung microbiome, in which the competing pressures of microbial immigration and elimination determine the lung’s ecosystem. The new paper, published in the journal mBio, doesn’t just describe the lung microbiome ecosystem; it also shows that scientists who want to study it in the future can feel confident using the standard techniques doctors already use to look for lung disease. Researchers conducted the study with eight healthy volunteers who underwent bronchoscopy at VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System. The team obtained the lung bacteria using two techniques to sample nine separate sites in the lungs of each volunteer. One technique, called protected specimen brushing, used a special catheter that keeps bacteria from the mouth and throat from contaminating the samples taken in the airways. Suspicion of such contamination has kept some researchers from fully accepting the results of previous lung microbiome research. So to test for this contamination, the researchers took one sample on a brush held in the middle of the airway and the rest using brushes that they gently touched to the airway wall. The researchers got other samples through bronchoalveolar lavage, in which they squirt a small amount of fluid into the deepest part of the lung and suction it back into the bronchoscope, bringing microbes along with it. They then analyzed the bacterial DNA found in all these samples. “We found no evidence of upper respiratory tract bacteria in these contamination control specimens,” says Dickson. “This reassured us that the rest of our samples truly reflected lung bacteria and not just contamination from the procedure” brought in by the bronchoscope as it passed through the throat. Taken together, the results suggest bronchoscope-based techniques can be used to study the lung microbiome—in sickness and in health. “The lungs are our largest interface with the outside environment, with 70 square meters of surface area,” says Dickson. “That’s 30 times the size of the skin and twice the size of the gastrointestinal tract. And this study confirms that they’re under constant bombardment by diverse communities of bacteria.” The researchers emphasize that these volunteers were healthy and had no symptoms that suggested pneumonia or other respiratory disease. “These volunteers were as healthy as you or me,” Dickson says. “We are probably all aspirating small amounts of bacteria constantly, and so long as our immune system is intact, they rarely make us sick.” Microaspiration in healthy people has been observed for nearly a century in studies using medical imaging techniques. “We’ve known about the existence of microaspiration for decades,” says Dickson. “But this is the first time we’ve been able to find its ecologic fingerprint.” Next steps in the research will include what happens in people who have problems with the elimination part of this equation. Inability to cough irritants out of the lung, or to carry them out through the sweeping action of hairlike cilia on lung cell surfaces, could lead to more microbes staying longer in the lungs than normal. And that could lead to a higher risk of lung infection. Such research could lead to better understanding of the lung microbiome’s importance in conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, and the types of lung failure seen in intensive care units. “If healthy lungs are like Antarctica—where conditions aren’t good for reproduction— then diseased lungs are more like a tropical island, where lower rates of elimination and altered environmental conditions permit the persistence and reproduction of certain bacteria,” he says. Dickson also thinks it would be interesting to study how the lung microbiome changes when a person has a viral infection that causes the upper respiratory tract to produce more nasal secretions. “I certainly look at my kids with their constantly runny noses and wonder if their lung microbiome looks more ‘nasal’ than ‘oral.'” And as researchers begin to uncover the impact of common medications such as antibiotics and proton pump inhibitors on the microbiome in the digestive system, he notes that it’s not unreasonable to think that these drugs also affect the lung microbiome. He and colleagues have already found evidence that the lungs are filled with gut microbes in critically ill patients. The research was sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Veterans Affairs, as well as the Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research, the U-M Medical School’s Host Microbiome Initiative, and the Michigan Center for Integrative Research in Critical Care.


Five students from Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine and one from the Faculty of International Liberal Arts studying to be a medical translator participated in a community health promotion program for families living in Japan with members whose first language is not Japanese. The aim of this program was to give medical doctors and medical translators of the future first hand experience of the challenges faced in health care by people living in Japan whose first language is not Japanese. “This form of international outreach based on medical care is a rare and unusual case to support both parents and their young children,” said Midori Nii of NPO CINGA, who coordinated the event. Furthermore, Naoko Ono, lecturer in intercultural communication in medical communication at the Faculty of International Liberal Arts, Juntendo University, also participated in the event and joined the students to interview families who had applied for health consultation as well as attending the health consultation sessions by Professor Yuko Takeda. Japanese was not the mother tongue of the majority of members of the participating families, they requested health consultations using ‘easy to understand Japanese.’ Through the interviews, the students realized that level of understanding and response of the participants depends on the manner of questioning. Professor Takeda observed that: "The language barrier prevents people from accessing appropriate health care, and could easily affect their health status.” She added that, “this outreach program is very effective in providing students with the opportunity to become aware of how important it is to recognize the wide range of psychosocial backgrounds of people who might be their patients one day. The role of doctors is not only diagnosing medical conditions for proper treatment but also becoming an advocate for their patients and the communities they serve." Hinano Tsuboya, participant and a second year medical student at Juntendo University, said, "I saw people who had health and medical problems as well as lifestyle related issues, due to differences in culture and language barriers; I realized that training to become a doctor is not limited to medical knowledge and technology. When I become a doctor in the future, I would like to be able to conduct medical care based on this experience.” The families also participated in games designed to teach the importance of good nutrition for a healthy life. The children particularly enjoyed collecting seals during the “stamp rally.” Reika Masuda, a second year student who was involved in planning the nutrition classes and who is studying to be a medical interpreter at the Faculty of International Liberal Studies said, "It was great to see active participation of the highly motivated children as well; it was worth all the preparation. As I was unable to answer some of the questions for a mother, and as someone studying to be an interpreter I realized that it is important to investigate and acquire sufficient knowledge beforehand in my field of study, and I think that it is important to directly connect to the other people’s world for a deeper understanding about their lives." This was the first such event even for ‘NPO Machinohiroba’ with the support of a social worker. Kazuko Kaji of NPO Machinohiroba said, "Although we have already conducted interviews with family members in our daily activities, on this occasion we were able to identify children's psychological challenges and health issues because we worked together with experts in medical and social care. In the future, we would like to continue carrying out our activities in collaboration with these specialists.” Further information A television program—NHK World Inside Lens: “Suturing Cultures”—about the approach of Juntendo University Faculty of Medicine to international education is available at the NHK World website below. As an integral part of English language education, students at the Juntendo University the Faculty of Medicine take courses in conducting medical interviews with patients whose mother language is not Japanese for deeper cross-cultural understanding, as is appropriate for medical practitioners. Available on demand at the URL below from 6 February 2017 to 19 February 2017 https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/vod/lens/ Participants -Juntendo University: Professor Yuko Takeda, Department of Medical Education at the Faculty of Medicine; Naoko Ono, lecturer in intercultural communication in medical communication at the Faculty of International Liberal Arts; five students from the Juntendo University Medical School; and one student from Faculty of International Liberal Arts. -Six staff from NPO ‘Machinohiroba,’ Saitama. -16 parents and their children living in Miyoshi with connections to Asia and South America. -Two social workers affiliated with the “multicultural symbiosis social work committee.” Mission Statement The mission of Juntendo University is to strive for advances in society through education, research, and healthcare, guided by the motto “Jin – I exist as you exist” and the principle of “Fudan Zenshin - Continuously Moving Forward.” The spirit of “Jin,” which is the ideal of all those who gather at Juntendo University, entails being kind and considerate of others. The principle of “Fudan Zenshin” conveys the belief of the founders that education and research activities will only flourish in an environment of free competition. Our academic environment enables us to educate outstanding students to become healthcare professionals patients can believe in, scientists capable of innovative discoveries and inventions, and global citizens ready to serve society. About Juntendo Juntendo was originally founded in 1838 as a Dutch School of Medicine at a time when Western medical education was not yet embedded as a normal part of Japanese society. With the creation of Juntendo, the founders hoped to create a place where people could come together with the shared goal of helping society through the powers of medical education and practices. Their aspirations led to the establishment of Juntendo Hospital, the first private hospital in Japan. Through the years the institution’s experience and perspective as an institution of higher education and a place of clinical practice has enabled Juntendo University to play an integral role in the shaping of Japanese medical education and practices. Along the way the focus of the institution has also expanded, now consisting of four undergraduate programs and three graduate programs, the university specializes in the fields of health and sports science and nursing health care and sciences, as well as medicine. Today, Juntendo University continues to pursue innovative approaches to international level education and research with the goal of applying the results to society.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

One of Austin’s top rated doctors, Christopher Seeker, MD, announced today the opening of a state-of-the-art medical aesthetics practice. The opening of SEEKER Professional Aesthetics (S.P.A.) represents the collaboration and partnership with his longtime nurse practitioner at Austin Area OB-GYN & Fertility, Casey Friesenhahn, WHCNP. While still maintaining the core OB-GYN practice, together they will oversee all aspects of S.P.A. services so they adhere to the same rigorous standards that have made Austin Area OB-GYN & Fertility Austin’s most trusted and recognized women’s medical services group. According to Dr. Seeker, “We did not take on this effort lightly. We did a lot of research to select the best laser technology, the most recent innovations, and the most comprehensive training in order to provide our patients with a complete suite of the most effective and safest medical aesthetics options available.“ Added Seeker, “We would not have made the investment [in S.P.A] if we did not think we could bring exciting novelty to the field of medical aesthetics for our patients.” The new SEEKER Professional Aesthetics (S.P.A), located within AA OB-GYN & Fertility offices at St. David’s Women’s Center of Texas, is a full-service medical aesthetics practice open to the public, not just patients of Austin Area OB-GYN & Fertility. Services available at S.P.A include: Laser Treatments, Photo Facials, Chemical Peels, Injectables and Laser Hair Removal. In addition to this comprehensive suite of aesthetic services, S.P.A. will also offer MonaLisa Touch® laser therapy for vaginal health and SculpSure®, a revolutionary, non-invasive body contouring treatment. S.P.A. features three private treatment rooms with a dedicated staff trained in the latest procedures. Visit online at seekerspa.com or call 512.533.4137 to schedule an appointment with the experts. SEEKER Professional Aesthetics is open M-F from 9am – 5:00pm and is located at St. David’s Women’s Center of Texas at 12200 Renfert Way, Suite 100. About SEEKER Professional Aesthetics SEEKER Professional Aesthetics is a premium one-stop shop for women’s health, beauty and wellness founded by namesake Christopher Seeker, MD. The original inspiration for S.P.A. resulted from the trusted partnership with Seeker’s long-standing nurse practitioner, Casey Friesenhahn, WHCNP. Casey noticed over the years that more and more of their patients sought their advice on how to counteract the impacts of aging without surgical or other risky invasive methods. Because of this trusted relationship with their patients, SEEKER Professional Aesthetics was born. About Christopher Seeker, MD. Dr. Seeker has been with Austin Area OB-GYN & Fertility since 1988. He obtained his doctor of medicine from The University of Texas Health & Science Center in San Antonio in 1984 where he was a member of Alpha Omega Alpha honorary medical society. He is board certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and is a member of the Texas Medical Association, Travis County Medical Association and American Society of Reproductive Medicine. Seeker is one of Central Texas’ most recognized and awarded physicians. Beyond his loyal patient following, Seeker consistently ranks among top doctors in popular annual listings, including Texas Monthly, Austin American Statesman, Austin Fit Magazine, and more. About Casey Friesenhahn, WHCNP Casey Friesenhahn, WHCNP, has been an integral partner and key member of Dr. Seeker’s medical practice for almost 18 years. In addition to her degree as a Women’s Health Care Nurse Practitioner (WHCNP) from University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas and her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Texas, Casey is certified as a Botox and filler injector. She is also trained and certified to perform the MonaLisa® procedure, laser hair removal, scar and leg vein reduction, photo facials and non-ablative laser therapy.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dr. Jin Kim, a world-renowned periodontist, honors American Heart Month by raising awareness of the link between gum disease and heart disease. To help as many people as possible overcome gum disease in Garden Grove, CA, and prevent the accompanying heart issues that may ensue if left untreated, Dr. Kim is now accepting new patients for laser gum disease therapy, with or without a referral. Gum disease is a serious condition that often goes unnoticed. Over 47 percent of the U.S. population has some form of gum disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Many with gum disease are unaware they have the condition until it becomes serious. Early symptoms, including swollen and bleeding gums, do not immediately cause a great level of discomfort. As the disease progresses, patients may experience persistent bad breath, pain, receding gums, bone loss and tooth loss. If left untreated, the infection that causes the gum disease can travel throughout the body. Current research suggests that the risk of exacerbating heart conditions or creating them increases when gum disease is present. Recommended by an authority in periodontology, Dr. Kim, the LANAP® protocol is a leading, minimally invasive treatment for gum disease. This technique allows Dr. Kim to only target the bacteria that cause periodontal disease, so healthy gum tissue remains intact and untouched. This results in little bleeding and swelling, and patients are often able to return to their regular routines in a very short period of time. The treatment can also help the gums reattach to the teeth, limiting tooth loss. Patients who may be showing signs of gum disease in Garden Grove, CA are invited to schedule a consultation with Dr. Kim. Doing so can allow them to reduce their risk of heart disease while maintaining a healthy smile. Dr. Jin Y. Kim is a periodontist dedicated to providing personalized dental care in Diamond Bar and Garden Grove, CA. Dr. Kim attended the University of Sydney Faculty of Dentistry before furthering his education with an advanced degree in pathology from the Medical School of the same University. Dr. Kim completed a periodontics and implant surgery residency at UCLA School of Dentistry. A uniquely dual board-certified specialist, Dr. Kim was board-certified by the American Board of Periodontology and the American Board of Oral Implantology/Implant Dentistry. The International Congress of Oral Implantologists and the American Academy of Implant Dentistry both gave him the title of Fellow. He was also inducted to be a Fellow of the prestigious American College of Dentists. Dr. Kim enjoys lecturing at UCLA School of Dentistry as well as national and international academic and clinical associations and universities including the International Association of Dental Research, American Academy of Periodontology and Academy of Osseointegration. To learn more about Dr. Jin Kim and the services he offers, visit his website at http://www.drjinkim.com or call (909) 860-9222 for the Diamond Bar location or (714) 898-8757 for the West Garden Grove location to schedule an appointment.


March 2, 2017 - Physical activities incorporating horseback riding can help to improve strength, balance, and other outcomes for children and adults with a range of neuromotor, developmental, and physical disabilities, according to a report in the American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, the official journal of the Association of Academic Physiatrists. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer. Such "equine-assisted activities and therapies"--using the horse as a therapeutic tool--"are clearly a viable intervention option for participants with impairments in balance, gross and fine motor function, gait, spasticity, and coordination," write Alexandra N. Stergiou and colleagues of Medical School of Ioannina, Greece. But they emphasize that further evidence is needed to demonstrate the clinical benefits of these activities. The researchers reviewed and analyzed previous studies of horseback riding interventions for patients with various types of motor (movement) dysfunction--for example, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and stroke. A comprehensive review identified 16 studies evaluating two types of interventions: therapeutic riding, defined as some type of adaptive or modified horseback riding with a therapeutic goal; or hippotherapy, which uses the movement of the horse for therapeutic purposes. Eight studies assessed the effects of equine-assisted therapies for children with cerebral palsy, including a total of 434 patients. Four studies evaluated the use of these interventions to improve mobility in older adults with multiple health problems and disabilities, 90 patients; and three studies addressed patients with multiple sclerosis, 52 patients. One study, including 20 patients, assessed the use of hippotherapy for patients after a stroke. The results suggested that therapeutic riding or hippotherapy had a "significant positive impact" in all groups of patients studied. Individual studies reported small but significant improvements in outcomes such as balance, motor function, posture, gait, muscle symmetry, pelvic movement, psychosocial factors, and quality of life. Eight studies provided sufficient data for pooled analysis (meta-analysis) of specific measures of balance and gross motor function. On a measure of balance, the effects of therapeutic riding were not significantly greater than for other types of therapy. There was evidence of positive effects on several dimensions of gross motor function, but no statistically significant effect on the overall motor function score. Mrs. Stergiou comments, "The evidence for therapeutic riding and hippotherapy is encouraging, but with gaps in that there are very few studies of these interventions in the international literature." She notes that the ability to perform meta-analysis is limited by the small size of the studies and the different measurements used. Within these limitations, the available evidence suggests that therapeutic riding and hippotherapy can be beneficial for patients with neuromotor disabilities. The studies show improvement on measures of walking and gross motor function in children with cerebral palsy. The research also provides evidence of increased balance and leg muscle strength in older adults, including stroke survivors. Further studies will be needed to examine how horseback riding interventions affect other important outcomes, such as daily activity levels and patient self-competence. "Equine-assisted therapies potentially provide advantage for cognitive, emotional, and social well-being," Dr. Stergiou and coauthors write. "Individuals who participate have the opportunity to simultaneously experience, benefit and enjoy the outdoors, which might not otherwise be readily available." Click here to read "Therapeutic Effects of Horseback Riding Interventions: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis." American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation focuses on the practice, research and educational aspects of physical medicine and rehabilitation. Monthly issues keep physiatrists up-to-date on the optimal functional restoration of patients with disabilities, physical treatment of neuromuscular impairments, the development of new rehabilitative technologies, and the use of electrodiagnostic studies. The Journal publishes cutting-edge basic and clinical research, clinical case reports and in-depth topical reviews of interest to rehabilitation professionals. About the Association of Academic Physiatrists The AAP was founded in 1967 to serve as the national organization of physiatrists who are affiliated with medical schools. The AAP is a member organization of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). The objectives of the Association are to promote the advancement of teaching and research in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation within an academic environment. The organization acts as a sounding board and forum for the exchange of ideas and information relative to all phases of the art and science of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Wolters Kluwer is a global leader in professional information services. Professionals in the areas of legal, business, tax, accounting, finance, audit, risk, compliance and healthcare rely on Wolters Kluwer's market leading information-enabled tools and software solutions to manage their business efficiently, deliver results to their clients, and succeed in an ever more dynamic world. Wolters Kluwer reported 2015 annual revenues of €4.2 billion. The group serves customers in over 180 countries, and employs over 19,000 people worldwide. The company is headquartered in Alphen aan den Rijn, the Netherlands. Wolters Kluwer shares are listed on Euronext Amsterdam (WKL) and are included in the AEX and Euronext 100 indices. Wolters Kluwer has a sponsored Level 1 American Depositary Receipt program. The ADRs are traded on the over-the-counter market in the U.S. (WTKWY). Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of information and point of care solutions for the healthcare industry. For more information about our products and organization, visit http://www. , follow @WKHealth or @Wolters_Kluwer on Twitter, like us on Facebook, follow us on LinkedIn, or follow WoltersKluwerComms on YouTube.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

WORCESTER, MA - A father's nicotine use may have a significant impact on children's risk of some diseases. In a study published in the online biomedical sciences journal eLife, Oliver J. Rando, MD, PhD, and colleagues at UMass Medical School, demonstrate that mice born of fathers who are habitually exposed to nicotine inherit enhanced chemical tolerance and drug clearance abilities. These findings offer a powerful framework for exploring how information about a father's environmental exposure history is passed down to offspring. "Children born of fathers who have been exposed to nicotine are programmed to be not only more resistant to nicotine toxicity, but to other chemicals as well," said Dr. Rando, professor of biochemistry & molecular pharmacology. "If a similar phenomenon occurs in humans, this raises many important questions. For example, if your father smoked does that mean chemotherapy might be less effective for you? Are you more or less likely to smoke? It's important to understand what information is specifically being passed down from father to offspring and how that impacts us." Studies over the past decade in the field of epigenetics - the study of inheritable traits that are carried outside the genome - have provided unexpected support to the notion that the environmental conditions experienced by a parent can affect disease risk and other features of future generations. In mammals, many of these studies have focused on interactions between the male parent and the offspring - paternal effects - as these are in many ways easier to investigate than maternal effects. Specifically, a number of studies have linked paternal diet to metabolic changes in offspring, while others link paternal stress to anxiety-like behaviors in the next generation. Despite the growing number of these studies, only a small number of paternal exposures have been explored rigorously in the lab. In addition, it has remained unclear in these studies whether the offspring response is specific for the paternal exposure, or whether it is a more generic response to a father's overall quality of life. To address this question, Rando and colleagues set out to determine how precise the response is for the environment experienced by the male parent, by looking at a single molecular interaction. Nicotine is a commonly used drug in humans, and acts by binding to a specific molecular receptor. Providing male mice with access to nicotine, researchers sought to learn whether their offspring were more or less sensitive to nicotine, and whether the offspring response was specific to nicotine or extended to other molecules. What researchers found is that the offspring of nicotine-exposed fathers, compared to the offspring of fathers that were never exposed to nicotine, were protected from toxic levels of nicotine. Researchers then tested whether this resistance was specific for nicotine by treating both sets of offspring with cocaine, which acts via a wholly distinct molecular pathway than nicotine. Surprisingly, the children of nicotine-exposed fathers were also protected from cocaine. This multi-toxin resistance is likely a result of enhanced drug metabolism in the liver, and corresponds to an increase in expression levels of genes involved in drug metabolism. These genes were also packaged in a more open and accessible configuration in the liver cells, allowing for increased expression. "This demonstrates that 'dad' paints with very broad brush strokes. Fathers exposed to nicotine do not specifically program changes in nicotine receptors in their children, as these children are broadly resistant to multiple toxins," said Rando. To determine if multiple, distinct molecules are capable of affecting drug resistance in the next generation, Rando and colleagues treated male mice with another bioactive compound, mecamylamine, which blocks nicotine receptors and is sometimes used to help people stop smoking. Surprisingly, offspring of these mice exhibited the same chemical resistance as those exposed to nicotine. "These findings raise key questions about what drugs or molecules are sufficient to affect children of exposed fathers," said Rando. "What distinguishes nicotine and mecamylamine from the countless small molecules present in our food and environment?" The next step for Rando and colleagues is to determine how many channels of information are being passed down from parent to offspring. "We now know that this information is relatively nonspecific," he said. "But is dad only telling us, on a scale of 1 to 10, that his life was good or not, or is he telling us four or five things broadly about the amount of food, level of stress and degree of chemical exposure?" Given the prevalence of smoking in humans, Rando notes that "there are obvious reasons to be interested in whether this type of effect also happens in human beings, but given the differences between mice and humans in their metabolism of nicotine, it will need to be tested rigorously in future studies of human populations." The University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS), one of five campuses of the University system, is comprised of the School of Medicine, the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, the Graduate School of Nursing, a thriving research enterprise and an innovative public service initiative, Commonwealth Medicine. Its mission is to advance the health of the people of the Commonwealth through pioneering education, research, public service and health care delivery with its clinical partner, UMass Memorial Health Care. In doing so, it has built a reputation as a world-class research institution and as a leader in primary care education. The Medical School attracts more than $266 million annually in research funding, placing it among the top 50 medical schools in the nation. In 2006, UMMS's Craig C. Mello, PhD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and the Blais University Chair in Molecular Medicine, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, along with colleague Andrew Z. Fire, PhD, of Stanford University, for their discoveries related to RNA interference (RNAi). The 2013 opening of the Albert Sherman Center ushered in a new era of biomedical research and education on campus. Designed to maximize collaboration across fields, the Sherman Center is home to scientists pursuing novel research in emerging scientific fields with the goal of translating new discoveries into innovative therapies for human diseases.


NAPLES, Fla.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--A new online forum for analysis and commentary, Analizir.com, has opened, announced Leslie Norins, MD, PhD, publisher at Medvostat LLC, its parent company. The debut analysis on the site, authored by Dr. Norins himself, claims the decline in print circulation of the “Big Three” national newspapers—Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and USA Today—can be reversed. He also presents his prescription for the turnaround. Smartphones and digital media are convenient villains, he says, because blaming them has diverted publishers‘ attention from necessary updating of print edition marketing. Dr. Norins believes reading the print edition of the Big Three marks a person as “substantial,” whereas a smartphone viewer could be consulting gossip, games, or even porn. “Print is positive, smartphones are iffy,” he says. He says one unsung advantage of the print edition page is its “glorious” display size, 264 square inches, versus the 13 square inches of his iPhone screen. Thus, print’s big page facilitates “serendipity,” which occurs when the reader’s peripheral vision unexpectedly notes nearby important, profitable articles on other subjects. He prescribes ads quoting millennials who benefit from the print edition, plus hiring “influencers” to tout the special advantages of this format. Dr. Norins also reports he found it difficult to find the Journal and Times on sale in Brooklyn, “in the backyard” of the Manhattan headquarters of the two papers. Dr. Norins has over 40 years’ publishing experience creating and growing over 80 subscriber-paid newsletters serving medical professionals. Before the publishing phase of his career, he was a physician-researcher. He received his AB from Johns Hopkins, his MD from Duke University Medical School, and his PhD from University of Melbourne, where he studied with Sir Macfarlane Burnet, Nobel Laureate.


The International Association of HealthCare Professionals is pleased to welcome Gale A. Sisney, MD, FACR, Diagnostic Radiologist, to their prestigious organization with her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. Dr. Gale A. Sisney is a highly trained and qualified radiologist with an extensive expertise in all facets of her work, especially breast imaging. Dr. Sisney has been in practice for more than 23 years and is currently serving patients within Global Radiology Outreach in Madison, Wisconsin. She is also serving patients within Radiology Mammography International. Dr. Sisney attended the University of Illinois at Chicago, graduating with her Medical Degree in 1988. Following her graduation, she subsequently completed her Diagnostic Radiology residency at Northwestern University Medical School, before undertaking her fellowship training in Breast Imaging and Intervention at the Swedish Medical Center: Radiology Imaging Associates. She has earned the coveted title of Fellow of the American College of Radiology. In addition to her clinical practice, Dr. Sisney is a lecturer for Herzing University, providing education and training for medical imaging and radiation therapy professionals. To keep up to date with the latest advances in her field, Dr. Sisney maintains professional memberships with the American College of Radiology, the Radiological Society of North America, the Association for American Women Radiologists, the Society of Breast Imaging, the American Roentgen Ray Society, and the Wisconsin Radiological Society. With her wealth of experience and knowledge, Dr. Sisney has been published extensively, and has appeared on several media, radio, and television broadcasts. Dr. Sisney attributes her success to her persistence. Learn more about Dr. Sisney by reading her upcoming publication in The Leading Physicians of the World. FindaTopDoc.com is a hub for all things medicine, featuring detailed descriptions of medical professionals across all areas of expertise, and information on thousands of healthcare topics.  Each month, millions of patients use FindaTopDoc to find a doctor nearby and instantly book an appointment online or create a review.  FindaTopDoc.com features each doctor’s full professional biography highlighting their achievements, experience, patient reviews and areas of expertise.  A leading provider of valuable health information that helps empower patient and doctor alike, FindaTopDoc enables readers to live a happier and healthier life.  For more information about FindaTopDoc, visit http://www.findatopdoc.com


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

In a 2012 survey, over a quarter (28%) of American adults with chronic conditions reported skipping doses or not filling a prescription because they could not afford to pay for it. Among those who were uninsured or under-insured, rates of cost-related problems getting medications were 30-60%*. At the same time, hospitals, pharmacies, manufacturers and nursing homes dispose of unused medications worth billions of dollars every year, much of which is dumped or burned and ends up in the water we drink and the air we breathe. “The costs of prescription medications have reached crisis levels,” says Elizabeth Landsverk, MD, founder of ElderConsult Geriatric Medicine. “Many people cut back on basics like food and utilities to pay for their prescriptions and many suffer serious declines in their health, increased hospitalizations, and even premature death by taking less medication than directed.” Now, innovative programs are saving lives by bridging the gap between unused pharmaceutical supplies and those in need. State legislatures began taking action on pharmaceutical donation and reuse programs in 1997. These programs create repositories that provide for unused prescription drugs to be donated and re-dispensed to patients. As of mid-2016, 38 states have enacted donation and reuse laws although not all these states have functioning programs. California enacted initial legislation in 2005 and significantly expanded its donation and redistribution law in 2012. In California, as in most states, redistribution does not include controlled substances and donations cannot be made by individual consumers, only by institutions such as hospitals and licensed, skilled nursing facilities. In 2015, the Santa Clara County Public Health Department opened the Better Health Pharmacy in downtown San Jose, the first dedicated drug donation pharmacy in Northern California. “The goal of the Better Health Pharmacy is to improve health by increasing medication access for all and serve patients who cannot afford their medications,” says Dr. Landsverk. “It provides medication without charge to the patient. There is no copay for insured patients and no need to have insurance. All that is needed is a valid prescription from a licensed U.S. physician and an ID. No proof of citizenship, residency, or income is required.” The pharmacy receives unused, unopened, and unexpired medications from licensed healthcare facilities. The drugs most commonly distributed are for asthma, high blood pressure, diabetes and depression. Because of the unpredictable nature of donations and demand, inventory is constantly changing and specific medications may not always be available. Commonly stocked drugs are listed on the pharmacy's web site and patients are advised to phone in advance for an inventory check. “Patients who take less medication than directed are not only risking their health and perhaps even their lives,” says Dr. Landsverk, “they also drive up costs by having more visits to the emergency room and stays in the hospital. This service is not only vitally beneficial for patients but it helps control healthcare costs and prevents the environmental pollution caused by disposing of millions of pills.” Elizabeth Landsverk, MD, is founder of ElderConsult Geriatric Medicine, a house-calls practice in the San Francisco Bay Area that addresses the challenging medical and behavioral issues often facing older patients and their families. Dr. Landsverk is board-certified in internal medicine, geriatric medicine and palliative care and is an adjunct clinical professor at Stanford University Medical School. http://www.elderconsult.com


MANILA, Philippines, Feb. 28, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Over the past year, many countries in Asia have witnessed an alarming rise in the number of dengue cases that account for more than 70% of the global dengue cases[1].  This translates to an overwhelming 273 million dengue infections per year out of the projected 390 million[2] cases both reported and unreported worldwide. In light of the rapidly increasing burden, leading infectious disease experts from around the world together with government officials, policymakers and public health authorities will convene at the Asia Dengue Summit to identify strategies that can effectively support Asian countries in their fight against dengue. The two-day Summit, which will start in Manila on March 1, is organized by the Asian Dengue Vaccination Advocacy (ADVA), a scientific working group, in partnership with the South East Asian Ministers of Education Tropical Medicine and Public Health Network (SEAMEO TROPMED). Experts at the summit will discuss the concrete steps needed to address the worrying rise in dengue cases as well as new developments in the area of prevention and control. The outcome at the Summit will help in formulating a roadmap for countries in Asia to implement collaborative and cost-effective strategies for dengue prevention and vector control measures. Speaking at the sidelines of the Summit, Prof Usa Thisyakorn, Professor of Pediatrics at Chulalongkorn University and Chairman of ADVA, said, "The success of the inaugural Asia Dengue Summit (ADS) last year shows that countries acknowledge the need to join forces to tackle the situation in Asia. A collaborative approach which encourages the sharing of research findings, epidemiological trends, disease surveillance methods and vaccine implementation strategies will allow countries to harmonise their existing dengue prevention and control efforts. In the war against dengue countries should fight together, not alone." "At the Summit this year, we aim to build on the on-going efforts of countries, strengthen the implementation of vector control, as well as prevention measures such as the use of the dengue vaccine that can ultimately benefit the local population," Prof Thisyakorn further added. ONE OF THE MOST PRESSING HEALTHCARE ISSUES OF OUR TIMES Dengue continues to be one of the most devastating and prevalent mosquito-borne viral diseases on the planet. In the last 50 years, this deadly disease has spread from a handful of countries to over 128 countries and the incidence has increased 30-fold in this time. The severe burden comes at a great cost -- financially and in the number of lives lost. Worldwide, dengue is estimated to cost about $9 billion annually, and in Southeast Asia, the economic toll for dengue was estimated at almost $1 billion on average per year from 2001 to 2010[3]. External factors such as unprecedented urbanization and globalisation have resulted in large mosquito populations living in association with crowded human populations, leading in increased transmission and geographic spread of the viruses, making it difficult to combat dengue outbreaks. In addition, environmental factors including inadequate housing, water, sewage and waste management systems have contributed to an increase in the Aedes Aegypti mosquito populations. This calls for urgent intervention and collaboration between countries towards detection, management and control to stem the spread of dengue across the region. Prof Duane Gubler, Emeritus Professor, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, and Chair of Global Dengue and Aedes-Transmitted Diseases Consortium, said, "The Summit represents a major turning point in Asia's fight against dengue as more countries unite to strengthen and sustain cross-border efforts. Dengue is a disease that must be controlled at the regional level.  Countries should continue this momentum at the grassroots via public education and at the national level through vector control and vaccination." "The recently released WHO position paper on dengue vaccine supports the use of vaccination to help prevent dengue as part of a comprehensive dengue control strategy in each endemic country, especially in areas where there is a high burden of disease," Prof Gubler further said. The dengue vaccine could serve as a new line of defense to complement vector control and other prevention efforts by governments, families and individuals, having a greater impact on the disease burden, keeping dengue under control. WHO has laid out the goal of the global strategy to reduce the dengue mortality by 50% and morbidity by 25% by 2020 in endemic countries[4]. Philippines was the first country in Asia to approve the use of the dengue vaccine in December 2015. Since then four other Asian countries, Indonesia, Singapore, Thailand and Cambodia, have approved the vaccine for use for the age group of 9-45 year olds broadly. Advocating an information-sharing approach to effectively control the disease from reaching epidemic proportions, Prof Lulu Bravo, Professor of Pediatric Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University of the Philippines Manila, said, "Philippines has been a front-runner in dengue prevention and became the first country in the world to launch a public immunisation programme. At the Summit, we will share our first-hand experience over the last one year, which shows that vaccine introduction should be part of a comprehensive dengue control strategy, including well-executed and sustained vector control, evidence-based best practices for clinical care and strong dengue surveillance." The Summit will serve as a platform for the sharing of best practices and knowledge exchange among countries. New models for ongoing dengue efforts such as the recent Wolbachia study conducted in Singapore, which showed that male Wolbachia-carrying Aedes aegypti mosquitoes could help in suppressing the population of urban Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, and other initiatives including community engagement and outreach programmes. The Asian Dengue Vaccine Advocacy (ADVA) Group is a scientific working group dedicated to dengue vaccine advocacy in Asia, with the aim of disseminating information and making recommendations on dengue vaccine introduction strategies in Asia. ADVA was set up in 2011 to identify opportunities and make practical recommendations for improving surveillance and laboratory capacity for dengue disease confirmation. For more information, you may visit ADVA's website here.

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