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Mischak H.,Mosaiques Diagnostics and Therapeutics AG | Kolch W.,University of Glasgow | Kolch W.,Beatson Institute for Cancer Research | Aivaliotis M.,Biomedical Research Foundation Academy of Athens | And 32 more authors.
Proteomics - Clinical Applications | Year: 2010

Purpose: Urine proteomics is emerging as a powerful tool for biomarker discovery. The purpose of this study is the development of a well-characterized "real life" sample that can be used as reference standard in urine clinical proteomics studies. Experimental design: We report on the generation of male and female urine samples that are extensively characterized by different platforms and methods (CE-MS, LC-MS, LC-MS/MS, 1-D gel analysis in combination with nano-LC MS/MS (using LTQ-FT ultra), and 2-DE-MS) for their proteome and peptidome. In several cases analysis involved a definition of the actual biochemical entities, i.e. proteins/peptides associated with molecular mass and detected PTMs and the relative abundance of these compounds. Results: The combination of different technologies allowed coverage of a wide mass range revealing the advantages and complementarities of the different technologies. Application of these samples in "inter-laboratory" and "inter-platform" data comparison is also demonstrated. Conclusions and clinical relevance: These well-characterized urine samples are freely available upon request to enable data comparison especially in the context of biomarker discovery and validation studies. It is also expected that they will provide the basis for the comprehensive characterization of the urinary proteome. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Gupta M.K.,Institute of Bioinformatics | Gupta M.K.,Manipal University India | Jayaram S.,Institute of Bioinformatics | Jayaram S.,Manipal University India | And 10 more authors.
Journal of Proteome Research | Year: 2014

In line with the aims of the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) to completely annotate proteins of each chromosome and biology/disease driven HPP (B/D-HPP) to decipher their relation to diseases, we have generated a nonredundant catalogue of protein-coding genes for Chromosome 12 (Chr. 12) and further annotated proteins associated with major neurological disorders. Integrating high level proteomic evidence from four major databases (neXtProt, Global Proteome Machine (GPMdb), PeptideAtlas, and Human Protein Atlas (HPA)) along with Ensembl data resource resulted in the identification of 1066 protein coding genes, of which 171 were defined as "missing proteins" based on the weak or complete absence of experimental evidence. With functional annotations using DAVID and GAD, about 40% of the proteins could be grouped as brain related with implications in cancer or neurological disorders. We used published and unpublished high confidence mass spectrometry data from our group and other literature consisting of more than 5000 proteins derived from clinical specimens from patients with human gliomas, Alzheimers disease, and Parkinsons disease and mapped it onto Chr. 12. We observed a total of 202 proteins mapping to human Chr. 12, 136 of which were differentially expressed in these disease conditions as compared to the normal. Functional grouping indicated their association with cell cycle, cell-to-cell signaling, and other important processes and networks, whereas their disease association analysis confirmed neurological diseases and cancer as the major group along with psycological disorders, with several overexpressed genes/proteins mapping to 12q13-15 amplicon region. Using multiple strategies and bioinformatics tools, we identified 103 differentially expressed proteins to have secretory potential, 17 of which have already been reported in direct analysis of the plasma or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the patients and 21 of them mapped to cancer associated protein (CAPs) database that are amenable to selective reaction monitoring (SRM) assays for targeted proteomic analysis. Our analysis also reveals, for the first time, mass spectrometric evidence for two "missing proteins" from Chr. 12, namely, synaptic vesicle 2-related protein (SVOP) and IQ motif containing D (IQCD). The analysis provides a snapshot of Chr. 12 encoded proteins associated with gliomas and major neurological conditions and their secretability which can be used to drive efforts for clinical applications. © 2014 American Chemical Society.


Thongboonkerd V.,Medical Proteomics Unit
Journal of Proteomics | Year: 2010

Extracorporeal blood purification and peritoneal dialysis are widely used in renal replacement therapy for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and acute kidney injury (AKI). Additionally, extracorporeal blood purification can be used also for treatment of non-renal disorders to remove endogenous or exogenous toxins from the blood circulation. Efforts have been made to characterize these toxins removed by diffusion (dialysis), convection (ultrafiltration), and/or adsorption (toxins are adsorbed onto the dialysis membrane and are thus removed) using different types of dialysis membrane. This review summarizes important findings obtained from recent proteomic studies applied to extracorporeal blood purification and peritoneal dialysis in settings of ESRD, AKI and hepatic failure. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Ahmed A.,Royal Tropical Institute KIT | Thaipadungpanit J.,Mahidol University | Thaipadungpanit J.,Medical Proteomics Unit | Boonsilp S.,Mahidol University | And 11 more authors.
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases | Year: 2011

Background: Several sequence based genotyping schemes have been developed for Leptospira spp. The objective of this study was to genotype a collection of clinical and reference isolates using the two most commonly used schemes and compare and contrast the results. Methods and Findings: A total of 48 isolates consisting of L. interrogans (n = 40) and L. kirschneri (n = 8) were typed by the 7 locus MLST scheme described by Thaipadungpanit et al., and the 6 locus genotyping scheme described by Ahmed et al., (termed 7L and 6L, respectively). Two L. interrogans isolates were not typed using 6L because of a deletion of three nucleotides in lipL32. The remaining 46 isolates were resolved into 21 sequence types (STs) by 7L, and 30 genotypes by 6L. Overall nucleotide diversity (based on concatenated sequence) was 3.6% and 2.3% for 7L and 6L, respectively. The D value (discriminatory ability) of 7L and 6L were comparable, i.e. 92.0 (95% CI 87.5-96.5) vs. 93.5 (95% CI 88.6-98.4). The dN/dS ratios calculated for each locus indicated that none were under positive selection. Neighbor joining trees were reconstructed based on the concatenated sequences for each scheme. Both trees showed two distinct groups corresponding to L. interrogans and L. kirschneri, and both identified two clones containing 10 and 7 clinical isolates, respectively. There were six instances in which 6L split single STs as defined by 7L into closely related clusters. We noted two discrepancies between the trees in which the genetic relatedness between two pairs of strains were more closely related by 7L than by 6L. Conclusions: This genetic analysis indicates that the two schemes are comparable. We discuss their practical advantages and disadvantages. © 2011 Ahmed et al.


Boonsilp S.,Mahidol University | Thaipadungpanit J.,Mahidol University | Thaipadungpanit J.,Medical Proteomics Unit | Amornchai P.,Mahidol University | And 7 more authors.
BMC Infectious Diseases | Year: 2011

Background: Pathogenic Leptospira spp. present in the blood of patients with leptospirosis during the first week of symptoms can be detected using culture or PCR. A proportion of patients who are positive by PCR are negative by culture. Leptospira spp. are fastidious bacteria, and we hypothesized that a false-negative culture result may represent infection with a distinct bacterial subset that fail to grow in standard culture medium.Methods: We evaluated our hypothesis during a prospective study of 418 consecutive patients presenting to a hospital in northeast Thailand with an acute febrile illness. Admission blood samples were taken for Leptospira culture and PCR. A single tube nested PCR that amplified a region of the rrs gene was developed and applied, amplicons sequenced and a phylogenetic tree reconstructed.Results: 39/418 (9%) patients were culture-positive for Leptospira spp., and 81/418 (19%) patients were culture-negative but rrs PCR-positive. The species associated with culture-positive leptospirosis (37 L. interrogans and 2 L. borgpetersenii) were comparable to those associated with culture-negative, PCR-positive leptospirosis (76 L. interrogans, 4 L. borgpetersenii, 1 unidentified, possibly new species).Conclusion: Molecular speciation failed to identify a unique bacterial subset in patients with culture-negative, PCR-positive leptospirosis. The rate of false-negative culture was high, and we speculate that antibiotic pre-treatment is the most likely explanation for this. © 2011 Boonsilp et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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