Medical Genome Project

Sevilla, Spain

Medical Genome Project

Sevilla, Spain
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Codina-Sola M.,University Pompeu Fabra | Rodriguez-Santiago B.,Quantitative Medicine | Homs A.,University Pompeu Fabra | Santoyo J.,Medical Genome Project | And 10 more authors.
Molecular Autism | Year: 2015

Background: Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders with high heritability. Recent findings support a highly heterogeneous and complex genetic etiology including rare de novo and inherited mutations or chromosomal rearrangements as well as double or multiple hits. Methods: We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) and blood cell transcriptome by RNAseq in a subset of male patients with idiopathic ASD (n = 36) in order to identify causative genes, transcriptomic alterations, and susceptibility variants. Results: We detected likely monogenic causes in seven cases: five de novo (SCN2A, MED13L, KCNV1, CUL3, and PTEN) and two inherited X-linked variants (MAOA and CDKL5). Transcriptomic analyses allowed the identification of intronic causative mutations missed by the usual filtering of WES and revealed functional consequences of some rare mutations. These included aberrant transcripts (PTEN, POLR3C), deregulated expression in 1.7% of mutated genes (that is, SEMA6B, MECP2, ANK3, CREBBP), allele-specific expression (FUS, MTOR, TAF1C), and non-sense-mediated decay (RIT1, ALG9). The analysis of rare inherited variants showed enrichment in relevant pathways such as the PI3K-Akt signaling and the axon guidance. Conclusions: Integrative analysis of WES and blood RNAseq data has proven to be an efficient strategy to identify likely monogenic forms of ASD (19% in our cohort), as well as additional rare inherited mutations that can contribute to ASD risk in a multifactorial manner. Blood transcriptomic data, besides validating 88% of expressed variants, allowed the identification of missed intronic mutations and revealed functional correlations of genetic variants, including changes in splicing, expression levels, and allelic expression. © 2015 Codina-Solà et al.; licensee BioMed Central.


Codina-Sola M.,University Pompeu Fabra | Codina-Sola M.,Hospital Del Mar Research Institute IMIM | Codina-Sola M.,CIBER ISCIII | Rodriguez-Santiago B.,Quantitative Medicine | And 23 more authors.
Molecular Autism | Year: 2015

Background: Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are a group of neurodevelopmental disorders with high heritability. Recent findings support a highly heterogeneous and complex genetic etiology including rare de novo and inherited mutations or chromosomal rearrangements as well as double or multiple hits. Methods: We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) and blood cell transcriptome by RNAseq in a subset of male patients with idiopathic ASD (n∈=∈36) in order to identify causative genes, transcriptomic alterations, and susceptibility variants. Results: We detected likely monogenic causes in seven cases: five de novo (SCN2A, MED13L, KCNV1, CUL3, and PTEN) and two inherited X-linked variants (MAOA and CDKL5). Transcriptomic analyses allowed the identification of intronic causative mutations missed by the usual filtering of WES and revealed functional consequences of some rare mutations. These included aberrant transcripts (PTEN, POLR3C), deregulated expression in 1.7% of mutated genes (that is, SEMA6B, MECP2, ANK3, CREBBP), allele-specific expression (FUS, MTOR, TAF1C), and non-sense-mediated decay (RIT1, ALG9). The analysis of rare inherited variants showed enrichment in relevant pathways such as the PI3K-Akt signaling and the axon guidance. Conclusions: Integrative analysis of WES and blood RNAseq data has proven to be an efficient strategy to identify likely monogenic forms of ASD (19% in our cohort), as well as additional rare inherited mutations that can contribute to ASD risk in a multifactorial manner. Blood transcriptomic data, besides validating 88% of expressed variants, allowed the identification of missed intronic mutations and revealed functional correlations of genetic variants, including changes in splicing, expression levels, and allelic expression. © 2015 Codina-Solà et al.; licensee BioMed Central.


Garcia-Alonso L.,Research Center Principe Felipe | Jimenez-Almazan J.,Research Center Principe Felipe | Jimenez-Almazan J.,CIBER ISCIII | Carbonell-Caballero J.,Research Center Principe Felipe | And 7 more authors.
Molecular Systems Biology | Year: 2014

Recent genomic projects have revealed the existence of an unexpectedly large amount of deleterious variability in the human genome. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain such an apparently high mutational load. However, the mechanisms by which deleterious mutations in some genes cause a pathological effect but are apparently innocuous in other genes remain largely unknown. This study searched for deleterious variants in the 1,000 genomes populations, as well as in a newly sequenced population of 252 healthy Spanish individuals. In addition, variants causative of monogenic diseases and somatic variants from 41 chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patients were analysed. The deleterious variants found were analysed in the context of the interactome to understand the role of network topology in the maintenance of the observed mutational load. Our results suggest that one of the mechanisms whereby the effect of these deleterious variants on the phenotype is suppressed could be related to the configuration of the protein interaction network. Most of the deleterious variants observed in healthy individuals are concentrated in peripheral regions of the interactome, in combinations that preserve their connectivity, and have a marginal effect on interactome integrity. On the contrary, likely pathogenic cancer somatic deleterious variants tend to occur in internal regions of the interactome, often with associated structural consequences. Finally, variants causative of monogenic diseases seem to occupy an intermediate position. Our observations suggest that the real pathological potential of a variant might be more a systems property rather than an intrinsic property of individual proteins. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.


Mendez-Vidal C.,University of Seville | Mendez-Vidal C.,Research Center Biomedica En Red Of Enfermedades Raras Ciberer | Gonzalez-del Pozo M.,University of Seville | Gonzalez-del Pozo M.,Research Center Biomedica En Red Of Enfermedades Raras Ciberer | And 10 more authors.
Molecular Vision | Year: 2013

Purpose: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal dystrophy characterized by extreme genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Thus, the diagnosis is not always easily performed due to phenotypic and genetic overlap. Current clinical practices have focused on the systematic evaluation of a set of known genes for each phenotype, but this approach may fail in patients with inaccurate diagnosis or infrequent genetic cause. In the present study, we investigated the genetic cause of autosomal recessive RP (arRP) in a Spanish family in which the causal mutation has not yet been identified with primer extension technology and resequencing. Methods: We designed a whole-exome sequencing (WES)-based approach using NimbleGen SeqCap EZ Exome V3 sample preparation kit and the SOLiD 5500×l next-generation sequencing platform. We sequenced the exomes of both unaffected parents and two affected siblings. Exome analysis resulted in the identification of 43,204 variants in the index patient. All variants passing filter criteria were validated with Sanger sequencing to confirm familial segregation and absence in the control population. In silico prediction tools were used to determine mutational impact on protein function and the structure of the identified variants. Results: Novel Usher syndrome type 2A (USH2A) compound heterozygous mutations, c.4325T>C (p.F1442S) and c.15188T>G (p.L5063R), located in exons 20 and 70, respectively, were identified as probable causative mutations for RP in this family. Family segregation of the variants showed the presence of both mutations in all affected members and in two siblings who were apparently asymptomatic at the time of family ascertainment. Clinical reassessment confirmed the diagnosis of RP in these patients. Conclusions: Using WES, we identified two heterozygous novel mutations in USH2A as the most likely disease-causing variants in a Spanish family diagnosed with arRP in which the cause of the disease had not yet been identified with commonly used techniques. Our data reinforce the clinical role of WES in the molecular diagnosis of highly heterogeneous genetic diseases where conventional genetic approaches have previously failed in achieving a proper diagnosis. © 2013 Molecular Vision.


Mellado-Gil J.M.,Pancreatic Islet Development and Regeneration Unit | Jimenez-Moreno C.M.,Pancreatic Islet Development and Regeneration Unit | Martin-Montalvo A.,Pancreatic Islet Development and Regeneration Unit | Alvarez-Mercado A.I.,Pancreatic Islet Development and Regeneration Unit | And 18 more authors.
Diabetologia | Year: 2016

Aims/hypothesis: A strategy to enhance pancreatic islet functional beta cell mass (BCM) while restraining inflammation, through the manipulation of molecular and cellular targets, would provide a means to counteract the deteriorating glycaemic control associated with diabetes mellitus. The aims of the current study were to investigate the therapeutic potential of such a target, the islet-enriched and diabetes-linked transcription factor paired box 4 (PAX4), to restrain experimental autoimmune diabetes (EAD) in the RIP-B7.1 mouse model background and to characterise putative cellular mechanisms associated with preserved BCM. Methods: Two groups of RIP-B7.1 mice were genetically engineered to: (1) conditionally express either PAX4 (BPTL) or its diabetes-linked mutant variant R129W (mutBPTL) using doxycycline (DOX); and (2) constitutively express luciferase in beta cells through the use of RIP. Mice were treated or not with DOX, and EAD was induced by immunisation with a murine preproinsulin II cDNA expression plasmid. The development of hyperglycaemia was monitored for up to 4 weeks following immunisation and alterations in the BCM were assessed weekly by non-invasive in vivo bioluminescence intensity (BLI). In parallel, BCM, islet cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by immunocytochemistry. Alterations in PAX4- and PAX4R129W-mediated islet gene expression were investigated by microarray profiling. PAX4 preservation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis was assessed using thapsigargin, electron microscopy and intracellular calcium measurements. Results: PAX4 overexpression blunted EAD, whereas the diabetes-linked mutant variant PAX4R129W did not convey protection. PAX4-expressing islets exhibited reduced insulitis and decreased beta cell apoptosis, correlating with diminished DNA damage and increased islet cell proliferation. Microarray profiling revealed that PAX4 but not PAX4R129W targeted expression of genes implicated in cell cycle and ER homeostasis. Consistent with the latter, islets overexpressing PAX4 were protected against thapsigargin-mediated ER-stress-related apoptosis. Luminal swelling associated with ER stress induced by thapsigargin was rescued in PAX4-overexpressing beta cells, correlating with preserved cytosolic calcium oscillations in response to glucose. In contrast, RNA interference mediated repression of PAX4-sensitised MIN6 cells to thapsigargin cell death. Conclusions/interpretation: The coordinated regulation of distinct cellular pathways particularly related to ER homeostasis by PAX4 not achieved by the mutant variant PAX4R129W alleviates beta cell degeneration and protects against diabetes mellitus. The raw data for the RNA microarray described herein are accessible in the Gene Expression Omnibus database under accession number GSE62846. © 2016, The Author(s).


PubMed | Pancreatic Islet Development and Regeneration Unit, Research Center Biomedica En Red Of Diabetes fermedades Metabolicas Asociadas Ciberdem, Medical Genome Project, University of Ulm and University of Geneva
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Diabetologia | Year: 2016

A strategy to enhance pancreatic islet functional beta cell mass (BCM) while restraining inflammation, through the manipulation of molecular and cellular targets, would provide a means to counteract the deteriorating glycaemic control associated with diabetes mellitus. The aims of the current study were to investigate the therapeutic potential of such a target, the islet-enriched and diabetes-linked transcription factor paired box 4 (PAX4), to restrain experimental autoimmune diabetes (EAD) in the RIP-B7.1 mouse model background and to characterise putative cellular mechanisms associated with preserved BCM.Two groups of RIP-B7.1 mice were genetically engineered to: (1) conditionally express either PAX4 (BPTL) or its diabetes-linked mutant variant R129W (mutBPTL) using doxycycline (DOX); and (2) constitutively express luciferase in beta cells through the use of RIP. Mice were treated or not with DOX, and EAD was induced by immunisation with a murine preproinsulin II cDNA expression plasmid. The development of hyperglycaemia was monitored for up to 4 weeks following immunisation and alterations in the BCM were assessed weekly by non-invasive in vivo bioluminescence intensity (BLI). In parallel, BCM, islet cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by immunocytochemistry. Alterations in PAX4- and PAX4R129W-mediated islet gene expression were investigated by microarray profiling. PAX4 preservation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis was assessed using thapsigargin, electron microscopy and intracellular calcium measurements.PAX4 overexpression blunted EAD, whereas the diabetes-linked mutant variant PAX4R129W did not convey protection. PAX4-expressing islets exhibited reduced insulitis and decreased beta cell apoptosis, correlating with diminished DNA damage and increased islet cell proliferation. Microarray profiling revealed that PAX4 but not PAX4R129W targeted expression of genes implicated in cell cycle and ER homeostasis. Consistent with the latter, islets overexpressing PAX4 were protected against thapsigargin-mediated ER-stress-related apoptosis. Luminal swelling associated with ER stress induced by thapsigargin was rescued in PAX4-overexpressing beta cells, correlating with preserved cytosolic calcium oscillations in response to glucose. In contrast, RNA interference mediated repression of PAX4-sensitised MIN6 cells to thapsigargin cell death.The coordinated regulation of distinct cellular pathways particularly related to ER homeostasis by PAX4 not achieved by the mutant variant PAX4R129W alleviates beta cell degeneration and protects against diabetes mellitus. The raw data for the RNA microarray described herein are accessible in the Gene Expression Omnibus database under accession number GSE62846.


PubMed | Research Center Principe Felipe, Medical Genome Project, University of Seville and CIBER ISCIII
Type: | Journal: Molecular systems biology | Year: 2014

Recent genomic projects have revealed the existence of an unexpectedly large amount of deleterious variability in the human genome. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain such an apparently high mutational load. However, the mechanisms by which deleterious mutations in some genes cause a pathological effect but are apparently innocuous in other genes remain largely unknown. This study searched for deleterious variants in the 1,000 genomes populations, as well as in a newly sequenced population of 252 healthy Spanish individuals. In addition, variants causative of monogenic diseases and somatic variants from 41 chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patients were analysed. The deleterious variants found were analysed in the context of the interactome to understand the role of network topology in the maintenance of the observed mutational load. Our results suggest that one of the mechanisms whereby the effect of these deleterious variants on the phenotype is suppressed could be related to the configuration of the protein interaction network. Most of the deleterious variants observed in healthy individuals are concentrated in peripheral regions of the interactome, in combinations that preserve their connectivity, and have a marginal effect on interactome integrity. On the contrary, likely pathogenic cancer somatic deleterious variants tend to occur in internal regions of the interactome, often with associated structural consequences. Finally, variants causative of monogenic diseases seem to occupy an intermediate position. Our observations suggest that the real pathological potential of a variant might be more a systems property rather than an intrinsic property of individual proteins.

Loading Medical Genome Project collaborators
Loading Medical Genome Project collaborators