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News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Marijuana isn’t exactly synonymous with mental sharpness, but surprising new research has found that it might help protect the brain from the effects of aging. A German study on mice published in the journal Nature Medicine found that low, regular doses of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive ingredient found in marijuana, may help to keep our brains from slowing down as we get older. For the study, researchers from the University of Bonn and Hebrew University spent a month giving daily THC to mice that were two months, one year, and 18 months old, and studied the effects on each. Scientists first tested the mice on their ability to recognize familiar objects and navigate a water maze without the influence of THC and found that, while younger mice did well, older mice struggled. Once they were given THC, the younger mice had a drop in performance, but older mice showed improvement that lasted for weeks afterward — and even did as well as younger mice that had no THC. Researchers say that THC in older mice might stimulate the brain’s endocannabinoid system, a group of brain and nervous system receptors that become less active as we age. Of course, the study was conducted on mice, not humans, and it’s too soon to recommend that adults start taking daily doses of THC based on this. But The Guardian reports that the scientists are planning to start a clinical trial to test this on humans later this year. “If we can rejuvenate the brain so that everybody gets five to 10 more years without needing extra care, then that is more than we could have imagined,” study co-author Andras Bilkei-Gorzo told The Guardian. Norbert E. Kaminski, PhD, director of the Institute for Integrative Toxicology at Michigan State University, tells Yahoo Beauty that while it’s too soon to draw any conclusions from the research, there may be something to it. “If low doses of THC decrease decline in cognitive function in senior citizens, this could be beneficial,” he says. Kaminski also notes that many diseases that cause a decline of cognitive function, such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, are thought to be due, in part, to chronic inflammation in the brain. Cannabinoids like THC have anti-inflammatory properties, he says, which may be beneficial for some older patients suffering from certain neurodegenerative diseases. Gary Wenk, PhD, a professor in the departments of Psychology & Neuroscience & Molecular Virology, Immunology, and Medical Genetics at the Ohio State University and Medical Center who is a member of the Governor’s Marijuana Advisory Committee, agrees. He tells Yahoo Beauty that the research “presents clear evidence for the cognitive and neurological benefits of low-dose marijuana use in the aging brain.” Wenk, who also has studied the impact of low-dose cannabinoids, says THC acts by reducing brain inflammation and its consequences upon normal brain function as people age. “It’s a very positive effect that is seen at quite low doses,” he says. Seth Ammerman, MD, a clinical professor at Stanford University’s department of pediatrics in the division of adolescent medicine, tells Yahoo Beauty that THC affects younger brains differently because it can disrupt normal pathways of brain development. But once a person’s brain has fully developed, Ammerman says, it’s “possible” that THC can help stabilize elements in the endocannabinoid system so that the effects of aging on the brain are tempered in a way. Of course, THC is responsible for the high that people feel from marijuana, so dosing is important. Women’s health expert Jennifer Wider, MD, tells Yahoo Beauty she has some concerns. “It has been well-established that THC comes along with side effects — even in older people,” she says, listing anxiety, paranoid thinking patterns, drowsiness, slowed sense of time, and dizziness as examples. “More research will be needed before this could become an accepted therapeutic modality.” Ammerman agrees, noting that “there are still a lot of unanswered questions.” Follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Pinterest for nonstop inspiration delivered fresh to your feed, every day. For Twitter updates, follow @YahooStyle and @YahooBeauty.


NEW HAVEN, Conn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: ALXN) announced today that researchers presented data showing that the rapid benefits of Strensiq® (asfotase alfa) achieved in adolescents and adults (ages 13-66 years at study entry) with hypophosphatasia (HPP) within the first 6 months were sustained through 5 years of treatment.1 These are the final data from the extension phase of a randomized, open-label, dose-ranging Phase 2 trial of Strensiq and they confirm previously presented interim results. The results were presented at the European Calcified Tissue Society (ECTS) Congress in Austria and demonstrate a reduction in two key biomarkers of HPP disease activity, as well as improvements in physical function in patients treated with Strensiq, as observed in tests to measure walking distance, running speed and agility, and muscle strength. Strensiq was generally well-tolerated. The most common treatment-related adverse events were mild to moderate injection-site reactions.1 “The findings of this phase 2 study suggest that asfotase alfa appears to be safe and effective long-term and reduces the debilitating burden of HPP in adolescent and adult patients,” said lead author, Priya S. Kishnani, M.D., Division Chief, Medical Genetics, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina. “Patients with HPP can suffer multiple fractures, deformities, short stature, impaired mobility, pain, and limited activities of daily living.” Strensiq is approved in the United States as a treatment for patients with perinatal-, infantile- or juvenile-onset HPP. Strensiq is also approved in Australia, Canada, the European Union, Israel, Japan, South Korea, and Switzerland. Further details of the study results1 In the primary phase of this study, patients were randomized to receive no treatment (n=6), 0.3 mg/kg/day of Strensiq (n=7), or 0.5 mg/kg/day of Strensiq (n=6) for 6 months. The majority of patients (with the exception of 1 adult patient) had confirmed pediatric-onset HPP. At 6 months, all 19 patients entered the extension phase of the study and were treated with 0.5 mg/kg/day of Strensiq, then changed to 1 mg/kg/day, 6 times a week, over the next 6 to 12 months. Fourteen patients completed the study over 5 years. Data from both Strensiq dosage groups were pooled for the primary analysis. The approved dosing regimen for patients with perinatal/infantile-onset and juvenile-onset HPP is 2 mg/kg administered subcutaneously three times per week, or 1 mg/kg administered six times per week. (The U.S. Prescribing Information recommends increasing the dose to 3 mg/kg three times per week in patients with infantile-onset HPP in cases of insufficient efficacy). HPP is a genetic, chronic, progressive, and potentially life-threatening ultra-rare metabolic disease that can affect people of all ages. HPP is characterized by defective bone mineralization that can lead to weakness and deformity of bones, fractures and other skeletal abnormalities, as well as systemic complications such as profound muscle weakness, muscle, bone and joint pain, seizures in perinatal/infantile forms of HPP, and respiratory failure leading to premature death in infants.2-6 HPP is traditionally classified by the age of the patient at the onset of symptoms of the disease, with perinatal-, infantile- and juvenile-onset HPP defined by the onset of the first symptom prior to 18 years of age. HPP can have devastating consequences for patients at any stage of life.2 In a natural history study, infants who had their first symptom of HPP within the first 6 months of life had high mortality, with an overall mortality rate of 73 percent at 5 years.7 In these patients, mortality was primarily due to respiratory failure.2,6,8 In patients surviving and those with juvenile-onset HPP, long-term clinical sequelae include recurrent and non-healing fractures, profound muscle weakness, debilitating pain, and the requirement for ambulatory assistive devices such as wheelchairs, wheeled walkers and canes.2,5 HPP is caused by mutations in the gene encoding an enzyme known as tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP). This enzyme plays a critical role in the proper mineralization of bones.2,3 Strensiq® (asfotase alfa) is a highly innovative bone-targeted enzyme replacement therapy that treats the underlying cause of HPP by replacing the missing TNSALP enzyme. In clinical studies of patients with HPP who had their first symptom prior to the age of 18, treatment with Strensiq improved overall survival in infants, enhanced bone mineralization and improved height, weight and mobility. Strensiq is approved in Australia, Canada, the European Union, Israel, Japan, South Korea, and Switzerland, and the United States. Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylaxis, have been reported in STRENSIQ-treated patients. Signs and symptoms consistent with anaphylaxis included difficulty breathing, choking sensation, nausea, periorbital edema, and dizziness. These reactions have occurred within minutes after subcutaneous administration of STRENSIQ and can occur in patients on treatment for more than one year. Other hypersensitivity reactions have also been reported in STRENSIQ-treated patients, including vomiting, fever, headache, flushing, irritability, chills, skin erythema, rash, pruritus and oral hypoesthesia. If a severe hypersensitivity reaction occurs, discontinue STRENSIQ treatment and initiate appropriate medical treatment. Consider the risks and benefits of re-administering STRENSIQ to individual patients following a severe reaction. If the decision is made to re-administer the product, monitor patients for a reoccurrence of signs and symptoms of a severe hypersensitivity reaction. Localized lipodystrophy, including lipoatrophy and lipohypertrophy, has been reported at injection sites after several months in patients treated with STRENSIQ. Advise patients to follow proper injection technique and to rotate injection sites. Patients with HPP are at increased risk for developing ectopic calcifications. In clinical trials, 14 cases (14%) of ectopic calcification of the eye, including the cornea and conjunctiva, and the kidneys (nephrocalcinosis) were reported. There was insufficient information to determine whether or not the reported events were consistent with the disease or due to STRENSIQ. No visual changes or changes in renal function were reported. Ophthalmology examinations and renal ultrasounds are recommended at baseline and periodically during treatment with STRENSIQ to monitor for signs and symptoms of ophthalmic and renal ectopic calcifications and for changes in vision or renal function. The most common adverse reactions (≥ 10%) are injection site reactions, lipodystrophy, ectopic calcifications and hypersensitivity reactions. Please click here for the full Prescribing Information.9 Alexion is a global biopharmaceutical company focused on developing and delivering life-transforming therapies for patients with devastating and rare disorders. Alexion is the global leader in complement inhibition and has developed and commercializes the first and only approved complement inhibitor to treat patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), two life-threatening ultra-rare disorders. In addition, Alexion’s metabolic franchise includes two highly innovative enzyme replacement therapies for patients with life-threatening and ultra-rare disorders, hypophosphatasia (HPP) and lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LAL-D). Alexion is advancing its rare disease pipeline with highly innovative product candidates in multiple therapeutic areas. This press release and further information about Alexion can be found at: www.alexion.com. This news release contains forward-looking statements, including statements related to potential medical benefits of Strensiq® (asfotase alfa) for hypophosphatasia (HPP). Forward-looking statements are subject to factors that may cause Alexion’s results and plans to differ from those expected, including, for example, risks and uncertainties of drug development, decisions of regulatory authorities regarding the adequacy of our research, marketing approval or material limitations on the marketing of Strensiq for HPP, delays in arranging satisfactory manufacturing capabilities and establishing commercial infrastructure for Strensiq for HPP, the possibility that results of clinical trials are not predictive of safety and efficacy results of Strensiq in broader or different patient populations, the adequacy of our pharmacovigilance and drug safety reporting processes, the risk that estimates regarding the number of patients with Strensiq and observations regarding the natural history of patients with Strensiq are inaccurate, and a variety of other risks set forth from time to time in Alexion's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including but not limited to the risks discussed in Alexion's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the period ended March 31, 2017 and in Alexion's other filings with the SEC. Alexion does not intend to update any of these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof, except when a duty arises under law. 1. Kishnani P, Rockman-Greenberg, C, Denker A, et al. Biochemical and Physical Function Outcomes in Adolescents and Adults With Hypophosphatasia Treated With Asfotase Alfa for 5 Years: Results From a Phase 2 Study. Poster presented at the European Calcified Tissue Society Congress, Salzburg, Austria, May 15, 2016. 3. Whyte MP. Hypophosphatasia: nature’s window on alkaline phosphatase function in humans. In: Bilezikian JP, Raisz LG, Martin TJ, eds. Principles of Bone Biology. Vol 1. 3rd ed. San Diego, CA: Academic Press; 2008:1573-1598. 6. Baumgartner-Sigl S, Haberlandt E, Mumm S, et al. Pyridoxine-responsive seizures as the first symptom of infantile hypophosphatasia caused by two novel missense mutations (c.677T>C, p.M226T; c.1112C>T, p.T371I) of the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase gene. Bone. 2007; 40(6):1655-1661. 7. Whyte MP, Leung E, Wilcox W, et al. Hypophosphatasia: a retrospective natural history study of the severe perinatal and infantile forms. Poster presented at the 2014 Pediatric Academic Societies and Asian Society for Pediatric Research Joint Meeting, Vancouver, B.C., Canada, May 5, 2014. Abstract 752416. 8. Whyte MP, Rockman-Greenberg C, Hofmann C, et al. Improved survival with asfotase alfa treatment in pediatric patients with hypophosphatasia at high risk of death. Poster presented at the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) 2014 Annual Meeting, Houston, September 14, 2014. Abstract 1097.


CAMBRIDGE, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Eleven Biotherapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ:EBIO), a late-stage clinical oncology company advancing a broad pipeline of novel product candidates based on its Targeted Protein Therapeutics (TPTs) platform, today announced the appointment of David Brooks, M.D., Ph.D., to Senior Vice President, Clinical Development. Dr. Brooks will be responsible for the execution of Eleven’s ongoing and planned clinical trials. He will report to Arthur DeCillis, M.D., Chief Medical Officer. “Eleven is at a pivotal inflection point, as we progress our Phase 3 registration trial of Vicinium™ and prepare to advance our second program, Proxinium™, into a Phase 1/2a study in combination with a checkpoint inhibitor,” said Stephen Hurly, President and Chief Executive Officer of Eleven Biotherapeutics. “We are pleased to welcome David to the Eleven team as we continue to build out our clinical development organization. David brings a highly-relevant skillset, including experience overseeing the simultaneous development of multiple oncology programs as monotherapies and in combination with immuno-oncology agents. We look forward to his contributions as we continue to evaluate the potential of our locally- and systemically-administered TPTs and work to bring new medicines that improve upon existing therapeutic options to patients.” Dr. Brooks joins Eleven Biotherapeutics from Deciphera Pharmaceuticals, where he served as Vice President, Clinical Research and Translational Medicine. In this role, Dr. Brooks led the clinical development of four oncology product candidates, set clinical strategy for assets entering testing in direct anti-tumor and immune combination therapy, and planned clinical trials evaluating the combination of immunotherapies with novel myeloid cell checkpoint blockers. Prior to joining Deciphera, Dr. Brooks was Senior Director Physician, Oncology Early Clinical Development at AstraZeneca, where he led the clinical development of a dual specificity PI3K inhibitor across multiple oncology indications and managed a portfolio of external alliances and investigator-sponsored studies. Earlier in his career, Dr. Brooks served as Medical Head, Translational Medicine at TESARO Inc., as Chief Medical Officer and Senior Vice President at Generation Health, Inc., and as Medical Director, Global Clinical Medicine at Abraxis Bioscience, Inc. He also worked at Shire Human Genetic Therapies, Inc. and Merck & Co., Inc. Dr. Brooks holds a M.D. and Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from Cornell University. He completed his residency in Internal Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and a fellowship in Medical Genetics at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia/Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He also served as an Instructor in Medicine in the Division of Medical Genetics at the University of Pennsylvania. “I am pleased to join the Eleven team at such an important time,” said Dr. Brooks. “The Company’s lead drug candidates have demonstrated promising anti-tumor activity and safety as single agents. I am eager to work with Eleven’s team to further demonstrate the potential of Vicinium in the clinic. I am particularly excited to progress the ongoing Phase 3 registration trial of Vicinium for patients with high-grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, a disease which has not seen meaningful advancements in approximately forty years.” Dr. Brooks is the third recent addition to Eleven’s clinical development group in recent months. In the first quarter, Eleven appointed Gary Conboy as Executive Director, Clinical Sciences and Mary Rohrer as Associate Director, Clinical Operations. Eleven Biotherapeutics, Inc. is a late-stage clinical oncology company advancing a broad pipeline of novel product candidates based upon the Company's TPT platform. The Company's TPTs incorporate a tumor-targeting antibody fragment and a protein cytotoxic payload into a single protein molecule in order to achieve focused tumor cell killing. The Company believes its TPT approach offers significant advantages in treating cancer over existing ADC technologies. The Company believes its TPTs provide effective tumor targeting with broader cancer cell-killing properties than are achievable with small molecule payloads that require tumor cell proliferation and face multi-drug resistance mechanisms. Additionally, the Company believes that its TPT's cancer cell-killing properties promote an anti-tumor immune response that will potentially combine well with immuno-oncology drugs such as checkpoint inhibitors. For more information please refer to the Company's website at www.elevenbio.com. Any statements in this press release about future expectations, plans and prospects for the Company, the Company's strategy, future operations, and other statements containing the words "anticipate," "believe," "estimate," "expect," "intend," "may," "plan," "predict," "project," "target," "potential," "will," "would," "could," "should," "continue," and similar expressions, constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Actual results may differ materially from those indicated by such forward-looking statements as a result of various important factors, including: the occurrence of any event change or other circumstances that could give rise to the termination of the License Agreement, the uncertainties inherent in receiving future payments pursuant to the License Agreement, the uncertainties inherent in the initiation and conduct of clinical trials, our ability to successfully develop our product candidates and complete our planned clinical programs, our ability to obtain marketing approvals for our product candidates, expectations regarding our ongoing clinical trials, availability and timing of data from clinical trials, whether interim results from a clinical trial will be predictive of the final results of the trial or results of early clinical studies will be indicative of the results of future studies, the adequacy of any clinical models, expectations regarding regulatory approvals, our ability to obtain, maintain and protect our intellectual property for our technology and products, availability of funding sufficient for the Company's foreseeable and unforeseeable operating expenses and capital expenditure requirements, other matters that could affect the financial performance of the Company, other matters that could affect the availability or commercial potential of the Company's product candidates and other factors discussed in the "Risk Factors" section of the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and other reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. In addition, the forward-looking statements included in this press release represent the Company's views as of the date hereof. The Company anticipates that subsequent events and developments will cause the Company's views to change. However, while the Company may elect to update these forward-looking statements at some point in the future, the Company specifically disclaims any obligation to do so. These forward-looking statements should not be relied upon as representing the Company's views as of any date subsequent to the date hereof.


News Article | May 20, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

Experts Call on Ministers of Health to Support African Union-Endorsed Candidate at World Health Assembly -- In an open letter to Ministers of Health today, 35 of the world's top global health leaders expressed support for Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus of Ethiopia to become the next Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO). On Tuesday (23 May), WHO Member States will select the next Director-General at the World Health Assembly in Geneva – a decision that will greatly impact health and lives of people around the world.Dr. Tedros' high-level endorsers – representing a broad cross section of the most influential people in global health in 23 countries and 5 continents – have called him the "most capable, qualified candidate".  They note his proven record reforming Ethiopia's health system, bringing primary healthcare to the country, cutting child mortality by 2/3, reducing HIV infections by 90% and malaria and tuberculosis deaths by 75% and 64%.These leaders – with long experience working in international health – also highlighted Dr. Tedros's public health and diplomatic leadership as well as his integrity, humility, and decisiveness."Dr. Tedros not only has the vision and experience to lead the world toward achieving the ambitious aims of the Sustainable Development Goals, including universal health coverage, but also the hands-on experience to be a supportive, credible partner to countries in efforts to achieve them," the leaders stated.The full text of the letter can be found on the campaign website and the list of signatories below.A wide-range of other leaders including former Heads of State, health, foreign affairs, development ministers, prominent academics and civil society advocates have also endorsed Dr. Tedros, found on the campaign website at www.drtedros.com Dr. Tedros served as Minister of Health (2005-2012) and Minister of Foreign Affairs (2012-2016) of Ethiopia, leading comprehensive reform which created more than 3,500 health centers; 16,000 health posts; trained 38,000 health extension workers; increased medical school enrollment; helped to improve supply chain and health information systems, and access to medicines. Dr. Tedros' public health experience is matched by experience in diplomacy and political leadership. As Board Chair of 2 major global health institutions – the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and the Roll Back Malaria Partnership. He also played a key role in negotiating the landmark Addis Ababa Action Agenda, where countries committed to co-finance the Sustainable Development Goals.If elected, Dr. Tedros would be the 1st WHO Director-General from Africa – as well as the 1st former Minister of Health or former Minister of Foreign Affairs to serve in this role., Distinguished Visiting Professor, University of Johannesburg;Former Executive Director, African Academy of Sciences, Former President, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO); Former President, Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, U.K., Senior Researcher and former Vice-President of Health Production and Innovation, Fiocruz, Brazil; former Executive Director, UNITAID, Geneva; former Unit Chief of Essential Medicines, Vaccines and Health Technologies at PAHO/WHO, Washington, Chief Executive Officer, Speak Up AfricaGlobal health and anti-poverty advocate, Executive Deputy Director, Institute for Global Health, Peking University, Director, Partners in Health Rwanda; Former Board Chair, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative, Professor of Clinical Public Health, Global Health and Surgery, University of Toronto, WHO Regional Director Emeritus (Europe), Founder and President, Speak Up Africa, Vice Provost for Global Initiatives and Chair, Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, University of Pennsylvania, President, University of Miami; Former Minister of Health, Mexico, Founder & Chief Executive, Rozaria Memorial Trust; African Union Ambassador on Ending Child Marriage, Midwife; Retired WHO Staff Member; Founder, Edna Adan Hospital & University; Former Foreign Minister and Former First Lady, Somaliland Republic, Former WHO Country Representative to Ethiopia; Former Senior Adviser to WHO Director-General Dr. Lee Jong-wook, Co-Founder and Former President, Global Health Advocates; Managing Director, Æquitas Consulting Pvt. Ltd., 7th President, African Development Bank (2005-2015), Chair, Global Health Innovative Technology Fund, Japan, Regional Director, Partners In Population and Development, Africa Regional Office, Director, Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, Women & Girls Advocate, Youth Leader, Partnership Manager at SEED Project, Former Assistant Administrator for Global Health, U.S. Agency for International Development, Member of Parliament, Lok Sabha, Odisha, India, CEO, Big Win Philanthropy;Former Minister of Health, Nigeria; Adjunct Professor, Duke University Global Health Institute, U.S.Executive Director, International Civil Society Support; Former Executive Director Dutch AIDS Fonds and STOP AIDS NOW, Founding CEO, Global Alliance for TB Drug Development;Founding CEO, Foundation for Innovative and New Diagnostics;Chairman, Next2People Foundation, Former President, International Planned Parenthood Federation; Former Chairman, National Population Council of Ghana, Founder-President, Wellbeing Foundation Africa, Clinical Professor, Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Canada, Founder and Former President, Women Deliver; Founder and Former President, Family Care International, Chief Executive Officer, Grand Challenges Canada, Director, Centre of Excellence in Women and Child Health, Aga Khan University, East Africa, Director of Healthcare Research, William Davidson Institute, University of Michigan, Former Director, China Program, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; Former Director, China Office, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Former Chief of Health and Nutrition, UNICEF


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

Genomic Vision (Paris:GV) (Euronext: FR0011799907 – GV), a company specialized in the development of diagnostic tests for the early detection of cancers and genetic diseases, today reports of its first R&D Day who took place on May 10, to the Imagine Institute (Necker Hospital) in Paris, in front of a panel of individual and institutional investors, financial analysts and journalists. This first event was aimed at presenting a global overview of the IVD activities of the Company with its historical industrial partner Quest Diagnostics and with several academic teams. During an inaugural speech, Stanislas Lyonnet, Ph.D., head of Imagine Institute, directeur de l’Institut Imagine, called back the commitment of the Institute in the research on genetic pediatric diseases and the outlines of the partnership with Genomic Vision. “Our Institute is a reference center for the molecular combing technology use since almost two years. This technology can meet our stringent requirements: establish a precise and early diagnosis of the pathology, identify the genes and the mechanisms involved, evaluate the different therapeutic options and transform the patient’s healthcare.” Subsequently, Jay Wohlgemuth, M.D., Senior VP, CMO of Quest Diagnostics and Edward Ginns, M.D, Ph.D, Medical director - Neurology of Quest Diagnostics, presented the move of Quest strategy from a lab company to an added value diagnostic service provider and reminded the importance for Quest of investing in new products and technologies. He therefore insisted on the strong link between both companies by using the molecular combing technology as well as co-developing diagnostic tests. Jay Wohlgemuth declared: “We at Quest Diagnostics have been collaborating with GV for over seven years and we are highly committed to our collaboration through providing samples and data to develop applications for the DNA combing technology. Applications take the form of biomarkers for pharmaceutical development and as a clinical diagnostics tool for genetic diseases. Our first success is the development of the FSHD combing testing as a standard in the U.S. I’m committed to continue our collaboration with GV.” About the development of the BRCA test in the breast and ovarian cancer early detection, Jay Wohlgemuth specified: “The DNA combing technology has been used to explore a BRCA test for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. We are currently performing a clinical study with GV using Quest Diagnostic’s samples and that process is ongoing. When data is available, it will be made public.” Aaron Bensimon, CEO and co-founder of Genomic Vision, indicated: « For the development of such a predisposition test, the environment profoundly evolved during the last years. BRCA test was initiated in 2012 and we had focused our analysis on the large rearrangements of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Today, we know that the screening tests for breast hereditary cancer are evaluating a wider panel of more than 30 genes. Our partner Quest Diagnostics and Genomic Vision have to reposition the BRCA test on this basis and this is on what we work at the moment.” On the SMA diagnostic test, the representatives of Quest Diagnosis explained: “SMA, spinal muscular atrophy, is an hereditary complex disease with a large portion of healthy carrier of the recessive gene responsible for one of the most common muscular dystrophies in the US and around the world. Through our collaboration with Genomic Vision we believe that we will be able to uncover biomarkers crucial to the detection of potential carriers of this disease. To achieve Quest Diagnostics are collaborating through the provision of samples to fully characterize the SMA genomic region. This work is ongoing and we hope to have results over the coming year.” Pr Nicolas Levy, Head of Medical Genetics department at the Children's Hospital La Timone (Marseille, France) was next to speak for its presentation on the diagnostic approaches in FSHD by molecular combing use. « Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy, the 3rd most spread myopathy, is perfect to demonstrate the benefits of the molecular combing technology. This one allows to update the genetic complexity of this disease while the other technologies currently used, including Next-Generation sequencing ones, don’t answer all the expectations. Off course, these NGS will evolve in the future but in our department we study pathologies which remain undetectable by them. Moreover, the molecular combing allows research in other pathologies, as the children leukemia”. Finally, Dr Petr Janda, CEO of PCS (Prague Clinical Services), the CRO in charge of the HPV clinical trial in Czech Republic and Dr Anne Jacquet, Director of Biomedical Research of Genomic Vision, presented the interim results of EXPL-HPC-002 study (http://www.genomicvision.com/wp-content/uploads/CP_GV_10-mai_HPV_FINAL-1.pdf). Dr Petr Janda reminded: “The current diagnosis tests of the cervical cancer are limited in terms of sensibility or specificity.” Beyond the promising results presented by the Genomic Vision’s HPV test, both speakers explained: “The use of the molecular combing allowed, for the first time, to visualize, to characterize and to quantify the number of HPV genomes integrated in the DNA of the female patients. This opens a new way in the diagnosis and the follow-up of the patients having a risk of cervical cancer associated with HPV virus by allowing the selection between the patients who are infected by the HPV virus but who will naturally eliminate it without developing a cancer and those who will require an appropriate care considering the rates of virus integration.” Through the presentation of the different IVD programs of Genomic Vision, Aaron Bensimon concluded: “The use of molecular combing presents a new paradigm on a large range of applications. This potential encourages us to build closer relationships with the clinicians, who are at the heart of the diagnosis of the genetic diseases and facing its deadlocks. Thanks to closer relationships with clinicians, we will be able to develop new tests, like we are doing for the SMA test." The whole conference of the R&D Day will be available for consultation on the Genomic Vision’s website in a few days. ABOUT GENOMIC VISION GENOMIC VISION is a company specialized in the development of diagnostic solutions for the early detection of cancers and serious genetic diseases and tools for life sciences research. Through the DNA Molecular Combing, a strong proprietary technology allowing to identify genetic abnormalities, GENOMIC VISION stimulates the R&D productivity of the pharmaceutical companies, the leaders of the diagnostic industry and the research labs. The Company develops a robust portfolio of diagnostic tests (breast, ovarian and colorectal cancers, myopathies) and analysis tools (DNA replication, biomarkers discovery, gene editing quality control). Based near Paris, in Bagneux, the Company has approximately 60 employees. GENOMIC VISION is a public listed company listed in compartment C of Euronext’s regulated market in Paris (Euronext: GV - ISIN: FR0011799907). For further information, please visit www.genomicvision.com This press release contains implicitly or explicitly certain forward-looking statements concerning Genomic Vision and its business. Such forward-looking statements are based on assumptions that Genomic Vision considers to be reasonable. However, there can be no assurance that such forward-looking statements will be verified, which statements are subject to numerous risks, including the risks set forth in the “Risk Factors” section in its Document de Reference filed with the French Autorité des Marchés Financiers (AMF) on March 28, 2017, under number R.17-009, available on the web site of Genomic Vision (www.genomicvision.com) and to the development of economic conditions, financial markets and the markets in which Genomic Vision operates. The forward-looking statements contained in this press release are also subject to risks not yet known to Genomic Vision or not currently considered material by Genomic Vision. The occurrence of all or part of such risks could cause actual results, financial conditions, performance or achievements of Genomic Vision to be materially different from such forward-looking statements. This press release and the information contained herein do not constitute and should not be construed as an offer or an invitation to sell or subscribe, or the solicitation of any order or invitation to purchase or subscribe for Genomic Vision shares in any country. The distribution of this press release in certain countries may be a breach of applicable laws. The persons in possession of this press release must inquire about any local restrictions and comply with these restrictions.

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