Shafallah Medical Genetic Center

Doha, Qatar

Shafallah Medical Genetic Center

Doha, Qatar

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Goda S.K.,Shafallah Medical Genetic Center | Goda S.K.,Cairo University | Elsayed I.E.,Cairo University | Khodair T.A.,Ain Shams University | And 2 more authors.
Biodegradation | Year: 2010

Five malathion-degrading bacterial strains were enriched and isolated from soil samples collected from different agricultural sites in Cairo, Egypt. Malathion was used as a sole source of carbon (50 mg/l) to enumerate malathion degraders, which were designated as IS1, IS2, IS3, IS4, and IS5. They were identified, based on their morphological and biochemical characteristics, as Pseudomonas sp., Pseudomonasputida, Micrococcus lylae, Pseudomonas aureofaciens, and Acetobacter liquefaciens, respectively. IS1 and IS2, which showed the highest degrading activity, were selected for further identification by partial sequence analysis of their 16S rRNA genes. The 16S rRNA gene of IS1 shared 99% similarity with that of Alphaprotoebacterium BAL284, while IS2 scored 100% similarity with that of Pseudomonasputida 32zhy. Malathion residues almost completely disappeared within 6 days of incubation in IS2 liquid cultures. LC/ESI-MS analysis confirmed the degradation of malathion to malathion monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic acids, which formed as a result of carboxylesterase activity. A carboxylesterase gene (CE) was amplified from the IS2 genome by using specifically designed PCR primers. The sequence analysis showed a significant similarity to a known CE gene in different Pseudomonas sp. We report here the isolation of a new malathion-degrading bacteria from soils in Egypt that may be very well adapted to the climatic and environmental conditions of the country. We also report the partial cloning of a new CE gene. Due to their high biodegradation activity, the bacteria isolated from this work merit further study as potential biological agents for the remediation of soil, water, or crops contaminated with the pesticide malathion. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Fathalla B.M.,Hamad General Hospital HGH | Al-Wahadneh A.M.,Queen Rania Childrens Hospital | Al-Mutawa M.,Shafallah Medical Genetic Center | Kambouris M.,Shafallah Medical Genetic Center | El-Shanti H.,Shafallah Medical Genetic Center
Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology | Year: 2014

Autoinflammatory disorders are a group of Mendelian disorders characterised by seemingly unprovoked inflammatory bouts without high-titer autoantibodies or antigen-specific T-cells and are probably due to defects in the innate immunity. We here report on a 4-year-old Arabic boy with the clinical presentation of an autoinflammatory disorder, namely Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma Gangrenosum and Acne (PAPA) syndrome. The presentation includes abscess formation after immunisation and recurrent mono-articular acute arthritis in various joints that responded favourably to systemic glucocorticosteroids, albeit without acne or pyoderma gangrenosum. The mutation analysis of the boy identified a novel de novo mutation in PSTPIP1, the gene responsible for PAPA syndrome. We recommend that the diagnosis of PAPA syndrome should be entertained in the differential diagnosis of patients with recurrent sterile pyogenic arthritis prior to the development of pyoderma gangrenosum or acne in order to initiate a timely management of the disorder. © Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology 2014.


Five malathion-degrading bacterial strains were enriched and isolated from soil samples collected from different agricultural sites in Cairo, Egypt. Malathion was used as a sole source of carbon (50mg/l) to enumerate malathion degraders, which were designated as IS1, IS2, IS3, IS4, and IS5. They were identified, based on their morphological and biochemical characteristics, as Pseudomonas sp., Pseudomonas putida, Micrococcus lylae, Pseudomonas aureofaciens, and Acetobacter liquefaciens, respectively. IS1 and IS2, which showed the highest degrading activity, were selected for further identification by partial sequence analysis of their 16S rRNA genes. The 16S rRNA gene of IS1 shared 99% similarity with that of Alphaprotoebacterium BAL284, while IS2 scored 100% similarity with that of Pseudomonas putida 32zhy. Malathion residues almost completely disappeared within 6days of incubation in IS2 liquid cultures. LC/ESI-MS analysis confirmed the degradation of malathion to malathion monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic acids, which formed as a result of carboxylesterase activity. A carboxylesterase gene (CE) was amplified from the IS2 genome by using specifically designed PCR primers. The sequence analysis showed a significant similarity to a known CE gene in different Pseudomonas sp. We report here the isolation of a new malathion-degrading bacteria from soils in Egypt that may be very well adapted to the climatic and environmental conditions of the country. We also report the partial cloning of a new CE gene. Due to their high biodegradation activity, the bacteria isolated from this work merit further study as potential biological agents for the remediation of soil, water, or crops contaminated with the pesticide malathion.

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