Fukushima-shi, Japan
Fukushima-shi, Japan

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Nakamura N.,Ikedatohka Industries Co. | Kondo S.,Medical Corporation Kenshokai
Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2015

Objective We examined effects of a food containing Shogaol, "Ginger Extract Powder S", on a cold constitution in volunteers with a subjective symptom of poor circulation. Methods A 4-weeks study with 12 female subjects, whose age was 20-35 years old, was conducted as an open-label trial. At first cold-water exposure test was conducted during the non-ingestion period: core temperature was measured at before exposure, just after exposure, 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 min after exposure (the non-ingestion period). After one day washout, subjects ingested test food, participated cold-water exposure test measured core temperature after single ingestion of the test food as with the case in the non-ingestion period (the single ingestion period). The third cold-water exposure and measurement for core temperature were conducted after 4-weeks ingestion of the test food (the 4-weeks ingestion period). Changes of core temperature, and a bodily sensation measured by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) were compared in each period. Results A result of analysis of core temperature, there was no significant change in the single ingestion period and the 4-weeks ingestion period compared with that in the non-ingestion period. On a variation of core temperature after cold-water exposure, the 4-weeks ingestion period showed significant inhabitation of decreasing body temperature compared with that in the non-ingestion period at 15, 30, and 60 min after cold-water exposure. On a result of VAS, the 4-weeks ingestion period showed significant improvement with items ("coldness of body", "leg swelling", "face swelling", "bad makeup application", "poor digestion", and "languidness") compared with those in the non-ingestion period. Conclusion These results imply that a food containing Shogaol would be useful for improving a cold constitution.


Osaki K.,Bizen | Arakawa T.,Bizen | Hikasa T.,Bizen | Kondo S.,Medical Corporation Kenshokai
Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2015

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of guava leaf extract (GLE) intake as a dietary supplement on the improvement of skin condition in women. Methods: Twenty eight women aged from 20 to 39 were divided into either control (n= 14) or GLE group (n=14), where their median ages were equal. In this open-labeled study, GLE group comsumed GLE-containing dietary supplements (600 mg of GLE per day) for 8 weeks. During and after the whole test period, skin parameters including melanin value, erythema index, and values for skin brightness (L∗) and color (a∗, red-green; b∗, yellow-blue; C∗, saturation) were evaluated. Results: At the UV-irradiated skin area, some values representing clearness of the skin color (b∗ and C∗) were significantly increased at 8 weeks after the intake of GLE-containing dietary supplement, while no change was observed in values of L∗, a∗, melanin value, and erythema index. The subpopulation analysis demonstrated that the effect of test article intake was significant with respect to L∗ value in women in their 20s. In addition, durability of makeup was improved after 4 and 8 weeks by the intake of GLE according to the questionnaire for the subjects. Conclusions: The intake of GLE-containing dietary supplements at 600 mg/day is suggested to increase skin color clearness by increasing yellowness and color saturation. In women in their 20s, the intake of GLE significantly increased skin brightness. Thus, daily consumption of GLE-containing food is suggested to be effective for the improvement of skin conditions in young women.


Osaki K.,Bizen | Shimizu Y.,Bizen | Yamamoto T.,TTC Co. | Miyake F.,Bizen | And 2 more authors.
Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine | Year: 2015

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is characterized by elevated serum γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity with hepatic steatosis, hepatitis or occasionally fibrosis that may progress to cirrhosis. The potential therapeutic role of oyster extract (OE) or OE-containing dietary supplements (OE supplement) in ALD has seldom been evaluated. In the present study, 84 adults who had an alcohol-drinking habit and marginally high serum GGT levels were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled feeding trial to study the effect on alcohol-impaired liver function as reflected by an increased serum level of GGT, as well as the safety, of an OE supplement. The subjects were randomized to receive either an OE supplement (OE group) or placebo (placebo group). There were 42 subjects (31 males and 11 females) in each group, and all the enrolled subjects entered the study. Four individuals (5%) dropped out for reasons unassociated with the study and 6 other subjects were excluded from the efficacy analysis because they did not maintain the required frequency of alcohol intake. As a result, 38 subjects in the placebo group and 36 in the OE group underwent efficacy assessment. Assays of GGT and other liver enzymes were performed at baseline (week 0) and at weeks 4, 8 and 12 of the intervention period. The mean serum levels of GGT in the placebo group gradually increased, while those in the OE group tended to decrease, although no significant within-group differences were observed for either group. A significant between-group difference in the change of mean GGT from baseline was, however, found at week 12 (P=0.049). No OE supplement-associated untoward side-effects nor any abnormal changes in routine laboratory tests and anthropometric parameters were observed throughout the 12-week intervention. An OE supplement shows promise in reducing risk factors associated with ALD in adults with an alcohol intake habit. © 2015, Spandidos Publications. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Bizen, TTC Co. and Medical Corporation Kenshokai
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Experimental and therapeutic medicine | Year: 2015

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is characterized by elevated serum -glutamyltransferase (GGT) activity with hepatic steatosis, hepatitis or occasionally fibrosis that may progress to cirrhosis. The potential therapeutic role of oyster extract (OE) or OE-containing dietary supplements (OE supplement) in ALD has seldom been evaluated. In the present study, 84 adults who had an alcohol-drinking habit and marginally high serum GGT levels were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled feeding trial to study the effect on alcohol-impaired liver function as reflected by an increased serum level of GGT, as well as the safety, of an OE supplement. The subjects were randomized to receive either an OE supplement (OE group) or placebo (placebo group). There were 42 subjects (31 males and 11 females) in each group, and all the enrolled subjects entered the study. Four individuals (5%) dropped out for reasons unassociated with the study and 6 other subjects were excluded from the efficacy analysis because they did not maintain the required frequency of alcohol intake. As a result, 38 subjects in the placebo group and 36 in the OE group underwent efficacy assessment. Assays of GGT and other liver enzymes were performed at baseline (week 0) and at weeks 4, 8 and 12 of the intervention period. The mean serum levels of GGT in the placebo group gradually increased, while those in the OE group tended to decrease, although no significant within-group differences were observed for either group. A significant between-group difference in the change of mean GGT from baseline was, however, found at week 12 (P=0.049). No OE supplement-associated untoward side-effects nor any abnormal changes in routine laboratory tests and anthropometric parameters were observed throughout the 12-week intervention. An OE supplement shows promise in reducing risk factors associated with ALD in adults with an alcohol intake habit.


Yanagisawa Y.,Miyama Co. | Yamamoto T.,TTC Co. | Kondo S.,Medical Corporation Kenshokai
Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2014

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the intake of lactic bacteria (Lactobacillus brevis Miyavis LB) on factors related to lifestyle disease in adult volunteers with mild symptoms of lifestyle disease. Methods: Sixteen subjects (average of 47.7 ±7.9 years old) who had mild symptoms of lifestyle disease received lactic bacteria (4 g; ∼4 X 1010 cells) daily for 8 weeks, and their levels of lifestyle disease-related factors were evaluated. Results: The intake of lactic bacteria for 8 weeks significantly reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure (from 132± 14 to 122± 17 mmHg and 85 ± 10 to 78 ± 10 mmHg, respectively P <0.05). In addition, serum total and LDL-cholesteroI reduced after 4th weeks after the intake (from237±29to220±29mg/dLand 150±32to 137±29mg/dL, respectively; P<0.05). Conclusions The intake of lactic bacteria is suggested to improve lifestyle disease symptoms in adult humans.


Kanehira T.,Coca Cola Japan Co | Kondo S.,Medical Corporation Kenshokai | Sato N.,Umeda Oak Clinic | Hirano M.,Coca Cola Tokyo R and D Co.
Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2014

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of indigestible dextrin-containing carbonated beverage on the postprandial increase in serum trigriceride level in subjects with moderately high fasting serum triglyceride levels. Methods: Volunteers (90 subjects) with their fasting serum triglyceride levels of 110-219 mg/dL were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Subjects ingested a high-fat meal (42.2 g fat) together with either a test beverage containing 5 g (as dietary fiber) of indigestible dextrin or a placebo beverage without indigestible dextrin. Serum lipids were determined before and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 hours after the high-fat meal ingestion. Results: The ingestion of test beverage suppressed the postprandial increase in the serum triglyceride level compared to that in the placebo group. The difference was significant from 1 through 3 and 5 and 6 h following the ingestion (P<0.05). This change was accompanied by a difference in the area under the curve (AUC) for serum triglyceride levels (mean ± SE: 1648 ±53 mg/h/dL for test beverage group vs. 1747 ± 57 mg/h/dL for placebo group; P=0.027). The increase in the postprandial remnantlike lipoprotein particle cholesterol level was also suppressed by the ingestion of test beverage (change in AUC of 29.9 ± 1.4 mg · h/dL vs. 33.5 ± 1.5 mg · h/dL for placebo, P=0.006). Conclusions: The ingestion of indigestible dextrin-containing carbonated beverage suppresses the increase in the postprandial serum triglyceride and remnant-like lipoprotein particle cholesterol levels in subjects with moderately high fasting serum triglyceride levels.


PubMed | Qsai Co., Tokyo University of Science and Medical Corporation Kenshokai
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biomedical reports | Year: 2016

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Kaneko K.,Coca Cola Japan Co. | Nakagawa S.,Coca Cola Japan Co. | Kondo S.,Medical Corporation Kenshokai | Ito K.,Yaesu Sakuradori Clinic
Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2016

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of indigestible dextrin-containing tea beverage on the postprandial increase in serum triglyceride level in subjects with moderately high fasting serum triglyceride levels. Methods: Volunteers (79 subjects) with their fasting serum triglyceride levels of 120-199 mg/dL were enrolled in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover study. Subjects ingested a high-fat meal (44.3 g fat) together with either a test beverage containing 5 g (as dietary fiber) of indigestible dextrin or a placebo beverage without indigestible dextrin. Serum lipids were determined before and 2, 3,4, and 6 hours after the high-fat meal ingestion. Results: When the subjects ingested test beverage, postprandial increases in the levels of serum triglyceride and remnant-like lipoprotein particle cholesterol (RLP-cholesterol) were low compared to those when the subjects ingested placebo beverage. The area under the curve (AUC) for serum triglyceride levels was 1504±478 mg • h/dL for test beverage and 1593 ± 509 mg • h/dL for placebo; P=0.044 and the AUC for serum RLP-cholesterol was 83.8 ±26.8 mg • h/dL for test beverage and 89.6±29.5 mg • h/dL for placebo; P=0.038. Conclusions: The ingestion of indigestible dextrin-containing tea beverage suppresses the increase in the postprandial serum triglyceride and remnant-like lipoprotein particle cholesterol levels in subjects with moderately high fasting serum triglyceride levels.


Watanabe M.,Kikkoman Biochemifa Company | Matsui K.,Kikkoman Biochemifa Company | Kondo S.,Medical Corporation Kenshokai
Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2015

Objectives: To investigate the safety and efficacy of hyaluronic acid for improving skin condition, a placebo-controlled double-blind comparative study was conducted in women who were concerned about wrinkles and dryness. Methods: Twenty-eight women were allocated to one of 2 groups receiving either a hyaluronic acid-containing diet or a placebo diet 3 times daily for 8 weeks. The daily intake of hyaluronic acid was 240 mg. The efficacy endpoints included skin moisture content, skin elasticity, and wrinkle characteristics based on skin replica analysis at baseline (before intake), and 4 and 8 weeks of intake. The safety endpoints included physiological, hematological, and blood biochemical adverse events. Results: The hyaluronic acid group (compared to the placebo group) showed a tendency toward improved skin moisture, had significantly improved skin elasticity at 8 weeks of intake compared with baseline, and had significantly improved mean maximum wrinkle depth at the corner of the right eye at 4 weeks of intake. Mean wrinkle area ratio and maximum wrinkle area ratio at the corner of the left eye were significantly increased at 4 and 8 weeks of intake compared with baseline in the placebo group, but not in the hyaluronic acid group. No adverse events related to food intake were observed, suggesting that intake of hyaluronic acid is safe. Conclusions The results suggest the efficacy of a diet containing hyaluronic acid for improving skin moisture, elasticity, and wrinkles.


Nakasone Y.,Kenkoukazoku. Inc. | Kondo S.,Medical Corporation Kenshokai | Yamamoto T.,TTC Co. | Iizuka M.,TTC Co. | Yamaguchi H.,TTC Co.
Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2014

Background: "Hie-sho" is a medical condition characterized by an often intolerable feeling of coldness or chill of unknown origin occurring in some body sites, particularly the waist and extremities. As some ingredients of garlic and ginger have been considered to be effective in relieving this medical condition, we tested a commercial product of dietary supplement containing ingredients of both garlic and ginger (GG diet) for its potential for increasing temperature and blood flow of the finger skin tissue, as well as for enhancing their recovery rate from the cold exposure, in women with "Hie-sho". Methods: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted on 32 subjects, who randomly assigned to receive either GG diet or placebo once daily for 8 weeks. The GG diet contained (in a daily dose) 453 mg of garlic powder, 90 mg of 25 % garlic sprout extract and 69 mg of 50% ginger extract. The finger skin temperature and blood flow were measured by the use of an infrared thermograph and a laser speckle blood flow imager, respectively. At week 0 (baseline) and at weeks 4 and 8, all subjects were measured for their finger skin temperature and blood flow 4 minutes prior to the start, as well as immediately and 10 minutes following the end, of local exposure to the coldness (15°C cold water) of the finger. Results: GG diet intake for 8 weeks slightly but significantly increased finger skin temperature without any effect on the local blood flow. Moreover, the rewarming rate of the cooled finger was significantly enhanced in the GG diet group but not in the placebo group after 8 weeks of intervention. Intake of GG diet did not cause any untoward side effect. Conclusions: GG diet is considered to have beneficial effects on women with complaint of "Hie-sho".

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