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-- Theawardedwith a 2017 Pacesetter Award, ranking it as the fastest growing private healthcare company in Atlanta for the second year in a row and as the 6fastest growing private company in Atlanta. From 2014 to 2016, as reported by the Atlanta Business Chronicle, CRH grew revenues 409% and its employee count 458%.When Bill Miller and Andrea Malik Roe co-founded CRH Healthcare just over four years ago, they focused on developing a company built around the patient. Since then, they have opened or acquired 28 urgent care centers under their three core brands in three states: Peachtree Immediate Care (GA), Patients First (FL), and Urgent Medcare (AL). "Our acquisition of smaller operators allows us to more quickly build a network of patient-focused, technology-enabled urgent care centers built around what we call the 5Cs: Convenient, Courteous, Caring, Competent and Compliant," said CEO Bill Miller. "Caring for almost 300,000 patients a year is a big responsibility, and one we take very seriously. In addition to investing in state-of-the-art medical record systems and digital x-ray systems (that are more capable than film), we have recently implemented new services such as online check-in that allow our patients to see wait times at all of our locations and reduce their wait by checking in from home or on the go."CRH Healthcare continues to grow in its current markets while looking for new markets to enter where it can add value to the medical community with its convenient, patient-focused urgent care solution.For more information about CRH Healthcare, please visit http://www.crhhealthcare.com


Sokka T.,Jyvaskyla Central Hospital | Kautiainen H.,Medcare Oy | Pincus T.,New York University | Verstappen S.M.M.,University Utrecht | And 44 more authors.
Arthritis Research and Therapy | Year: 2010

Introduction: Work disability is a major consequence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), associated not only with traditional disease activity variables, but also more significantly with demographic, functional, occupational, and societal variables. Recent reports suggest that the use of biologic agents offers potential for reduced work disability rates, but the conclusions are based on surrogate disease activity measures derived from studies primarily from Western countries.Methods: The Quantitative Standard Monitoring of Patients with RA (QUEST-RA) multinational database of 8,039 patients in 86 sites in 32 countries, 16 with high gross domestic product (GDP) (>24K US dollars (USD) per capita) and 16 low-GDP countries (<11K USD), was analyzed for work and disability status at onset and over the course of RA and clinical status of patients who continued working or had stopped working in high-GDP versus low-GDP countries according to all RA Core Data Set measures. Associations of work disability status with RA Core Data Set variables and indices were analyzed using descriptive statistics and regression analyses.Results: At the time of first symptoms, 86% of men (range 57%-100% among countries) and 64% (19%-87%) of women <65 years were working. More than one third (37%) of these patients reported subsequent work disability because of RA. Among 1,756 patients whose symptoms had begun during the 2000s, the probabilities of continuing to work were 80% (95% confidence interval (CI) 78%-82%) at 2 years and 68% (95% CI 65%-71%) at 5 years, with similar patterns in high-GDP and low-GDP countries. Patients who continued working versus stopped working had significantly better clinical status for all clinical status measures and patient self-report scores, with similar patterns in high-GDP and low-GDP countries. However, patients who had stopped working in high-GDP countries had better clinical status than patients who continued working in low-GDP countries. The most significant identifier of work disability in all subgroups was Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) functional disability score.Conclusions: Work disability rates remain high among people with RA during this millennium. In low-GDP countries, people remain working with high levels of disability and disease activity. Cultural and economic differences between societies affect work disability as an outcome measure for RA. © 2010 Sokka et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Hamalainen H.,University of Helsinki | Kautiainen H.,Central Finland Central Hospital | Kautiainen H.,Kuopio University Hospital | Pohjolainen T.,Rehabilitation Unit | And 2 more authors.
Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology | Year: 2011

Objective. We investigated the implementation of pharmaceutical osteoporosis (OP) prevention in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Finland. Methods. All incident RA cases from 2000 to 2007 were identified using the national register of the Social Insurance Institution (SII) as the sole source. The use of calcium and vitamin D preparations and OP drugs during the first year was evaluated. Results. A total of 14,878 incident RA patients were found. They had a mean age of 56 (SD 15) and 68% were female. Nine per cent of the total number, which equated to 11% for women and to 5% men, had purchased OP drugs. The use of OP drugs increased over time: in the 2006-2007 period, relative risk (RR)for purchase was 1.62 (95% CI 138-1.92) for women and 2.1 (134-330) for men compared to the 2000-2001 period. Over the 2000-2005 period, 49% of females and 52% of males used glucocorticoids (GCs) during the first year. Among the GC-users, 38% of women and 24% of men also received calcium and vitamin D preparations by prescription, and 14% of women and 6% of men also used OP drugs. For GC users, the female sex, and older age increased the risk for OP use: the respective RRs were 1.45 (95% CI 131-1.61), 2.54 (95% CI 2.21-2.91), and 1.060 (95% CI 1.057-1.065). Conclusion. Patients with early RA are increasingly receiving OP drugs, and the use is more frequent among patients with known risk factors. © Copyright CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RHEUMATOLOGY 2011.


Jawaheer D.,University of California at Los Angeles | Jawaheer D.,Hospital Oakland Research Institute | Olsen J.,University of California at Los Angeles | Lahiff M.,University of California at Berkeley | And 144 more authors.
Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology | Year: 2010

Objective: To investigate whether body mass index (BMI), as a proxy for body fat, influences rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity in a gender-specific manner. Methods: Consecutive patients with RA were enrolled from 25 countries into the QUEST-RA program between 2005 and 2008. Clinical and demographic data were collected by treating rheumatologists and by patient self-report. Distributions of Disease Activity Scores (DAS28), BMI, age, and disease duration were assessed for each country and for the entire dataset; mean values between genders were compared using Student's t-tests. An association between BMI and DAS28 was investigated using linear regression, adjusting for age, disease duration and country. Results: A total of 5,161 RA patients (4,082 women and 1,079 men) were included in the analyses. Overall, women were younger, had longer disease duration, and higher DAS28 scores than men, but BMI was similar between genders. The mean DAS28 scores increased with increasing BMI from normal to overweight and obese, among women, whereas the opposite trend was observed among men. Regression results showed BMI (continuous or categorical) to be associated with DAS28. Compared to the normal BMI range, being obese was associated with a larger difference in mean DAS28 (0.23, 95% CI: 0.11, 0.34) than being overweight (0.12, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.21); being underweight was not associated with disease activity. These associations were more pronounced among women, and were not explained by any single component of the DAS28. Conclusion: BMI appears to be associated with RA disease activity in women, but not in men. © Copyright Clinical and Experimental Rheumatology 2010.


WiseGuyReports.Com Publish a New Market Research Report On –“Patient Lift Accessories Market 2016 Global Growth,Share,Trends,Demand & Analysis of Top Key Players Research Report Forecasts to 2021”. This report studies Patient Lift Accessories in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering  3M Healthcare  Alimed  Bestcare LLC  Djo Global  Getinge Group  Linak Us Inc  Patterson Medical  Therafin Corp.  Medical Depot, Inc  Aacurat gmbh  Handi-Move  Provita medical  Medcare  Invacare  SMT Health Systems  Graham Field  Joerns For more information or any query mail at [email protected] Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Patient Lift Accessories in these regions, from 2011 to 2021 (forecast), like  North America  Europe  China  Japan  Southeast Asia  India  Split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, can be divided into  Hangers  Slings  sling straps  chain sets  bariatric chain Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Patient Lift Accessories in each application, can be divided into  Application 1  Application 2  Application 3 Global Patient Lift Accessories Market Research Report 2016  1 Patient Lift Accessories Market Overview  1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Patient Lift Accessories  1.2 Patient Lift Accessories Segment by Type  1.2.1 Global Production Market Share of Patient Lift Accessories by Type in 2015  1.2.2 Hangers  1.2.3 Slings  1.2.4 sling straps  1.2.5 chain sets  1.2.6 bariatric chain  1.3 Patient Lift Accessories Segment by Application  1.3.1 Patient Lift Accessories Consumption Market Share by Application in 2015  1.3.2 Application 1  1.3.3 Application 2  1.3.4 Application 3  1.4 Patient Lift Accessories Market by Region  1.4.1 North America Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.2 Europe Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.3 China Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.4 Japan Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.5 Southeast Asia Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.4.6 India Status and Prospect (2011-2021)  1.5 Global Market Size (Value) of Patient Lift Accessories (2011-2021) 2 Global Patient Lift Accessories Market Competition by Manufacturers  2.1 Global Patient Lift Accessories Production and Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016)  2.2 Global Patient Lift Accessories Revenue and Share by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016)  2.3 Global Patient Lift Accessories Average Price by Manufacturers (2015 and 2016)  2.4 Manufacturers Patient Lift Accessories Manufacturing Base Distribution, Sales Area and Product Type  2.5 Patient Lift Accessories Market Competitive Situation and Trends  2.5.1 Patient Lift Accessories Market Concentration Rate  2.5.2 Patient Lift Accessories Market Share of Top 3 and Top 5 Manufacturers  2.5.3 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion 7 Global Patient Lift Accessories Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis  7.1 3M Healthcare  7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.1.2 Patient Lift Accessories Product Type, Application and Specification  7.1.2.1 Type I  7.1.2.2 Type II  7.1.3 3M Healthcare Patient Lift Accessories Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.2 Alimed  7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.2.2 Patient Lift Accessories Product Type, Application and Specification  7.2.2.1 Type I  7.2.2.2 Type II  7.2.3 Alimed Patient Lift Accessories Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.3 Bestcare LLC  7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.3.2 Patient Lift Accessories Product Type, Application and Specification  7.3.2.1 Type I  7.3.2.2 Type II  7.3.3 Bestcare LLC Patient Lift Accessories Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.4 Djo Global  7.4.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.4.2 Patient Lift Accessories Product Type, Application and Specification  7.4.2.1 Type I  7.4.2.2 Type II  7.4.3 Djo Global Patient Lift Accessories Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.4.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.5 Getinge Group  7.5.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.5.2 Patient Lift Accessories Product Type, Application and Specification  7.5.2.1 Type I  7.5.2.2 Type II  7.5.3 Getinge Group Patient Lift Accessories Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.5.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.6 Linak Us Inc  7.6.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.6.2 Patient Lift Accessories Product Type, Application and Specification  7.6.2.1 Type I  7.6.2.2 Type II  7.6.3 Linak Us Inc Patient Lift Accessories Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.6.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.7 Patterson Medical  7.7.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.7.2 Patient Lift Accessories Product Type, Application and Specification  7.7.2.1 Type I  7.7.2.2 Type II  7.7.3 Patterson Medical Patient Lift Accessories Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.7.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.8 Therafin Corp.  7.8.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.8.2 Patient Lift Accessories Product Type, Application and Specification  7.8.2.1 Type I  7.8.2.2 Type II  7.8.3 Therafin Corp. Patient Lift Accessories Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.8.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.9 Medical Depot, Inc  7.9.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.9.2 Patient Lift Accessories Product Type, Application and Specification  7.9.2.1 Type I  7.9.2.2 Type II  7.9.3 Medical Depot, Inc Patient Lift Accessories Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016) 7.9.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.10 Aacurat gmbh  7.10.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base and Its Competitors  7.10.2 Patient Lift Accessories Product Type, Application and Specification  7.10.2.1 Type I  7.10.2.2 Type II  7.10.3 Aacurat gmbh Patient Lift Accessories Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015 and 2016)  7.10.4 Main Business/Business Overview  7.11 Handi-Move  7.12 Provita medical  7.13 Medcare  7.14 Invacare  7.15 SMT Health Systems  7.16 Graham Field  7.17 Joerns For more information or any query mail at [email protected] Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Consultants Pvt. Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe. Wise Guy Reports features an exhaustive list of market research reports from hundreds of publishers worldwide. We boast a database spanning virtually every market category and an even more comprehensive collection of market research reports under these categories and sub-categories.


Jauhiainen T.,University of Helsinki | Jauhiainen T.,Valio Ltd | Pilvi T.,University of Helsinki | Pilvi T.,Valio Ltd | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Nutrition and Metabolism | Year: 2010

Tripeptides isoleucyl-prolyl-proline (IPP) and valyl-prolyl-proline (VPP) act as ACE inhibitors in vitro. Double transgenic rats (dTGR) harbouring human renin and human angiotensinogen genes develop malignant hypertension due to increased angiotensin II formation. The present study was aimed to evaluate possible antihypertensive effect of IPP and VPP in this severe model. Four-week-old dTGR were randomized in three groups to receive: (1) water (control), (2) fermented milk containing IPP and VPP, and (3) IPP and VPP dissolved in water for three weeks. Fermented milk, but not peptides in water, attenuated the development of hypertension in dTGR by 19 mmHg versus the control group (P =.023). In vitro vascular function tests showed that high concentrations of the peptides evinced ACE inhibitory properties. In other hypertension related variables, no significant differences between the treatment groups were found. In conclusion, fermented milk product containing IPP and VPP prevents development of malignant hypertension in an animal model. © 2010 Tiina Jauhiainen et al.


Turpeinen A.M.,Valio Ltd | Jarvenpaa S.,Medcare Oy | Kautiainen H.,Central Finland Central Hospital | Kautiainen H.,Kuopio University Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Annals of Medicine | Year: 2013

A meta-analysis of possible antihypertensive effects of small doses of bioactive tripeptides isoleucine-proline-proline and valine-proline-proline in commercial milk products or tablets was carried out. A random effects model was used on 19 randomized, placebo-controlled clinical intervention trials (published 1996-October 2010) consisting of about 1500 prehypertensive or mildly hypertensive subjects.The overall blood pressure lowering for systolic blood pressure was -4.0 mmHg (95% CI -5.9 to -2.1 mmHg, P < 0.001) and for diastolic blood pressure -1.9 mmHg (95% CI -3.1 to -0.8 mmHg, P < 0.001). However, a positive effect was not reported in all the studies. The results suggest that rather small daily doses of the lactotripeptides in different functional food products may offer a valuable option as a non-pharmacological treatment of prehypertension or mild hypertension as part of life-style advice. © 2013 Informa UK, Ltd.


Turpeinen A.M.,Valio Ltd. | Ehlers P.I.,University of Helsinki | Kivimaki A.S.,University of Helsinki | Jarvenpaa S.,Medcare Oy | And 6 more authors.
Clinical and Experimental Hypertension | Year: 2011

Casein-derived tripeptides isoleucine-proline-proline (Ile-Pro-Pro) and valine-proline-proline (Val-Pro-Pro) lower blood pressure (BP) in long-term clinical studies. Their acute effects on BP and vascular function, important for daily dosing scheme, were studied in a placebo-controlled double-blind crossover study using a single oral dose of a fermented milk product containing Ile-Pro-Pro and Val-Pro-Pro as well as plant sterols. Twenty-five subjects with untreated mild hypertension received in random order 250 g of study product (25 mg peptides and 2 g plant sterols) or placebo. Ambulatory BP was monitored for 8 h post-dose and arterial stiffness measured by pulse wave analysis at 2, 4, and 8 h. Blood and urine samples were analyzed for markers of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and endothelial function. Baseline adjusted treatment effect for systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial BP was -2.1 mmHg (95% CI: -4.1 to -0.1, p = 0.045), -1.6 mmHg (95% CI: -3.1 to -0.1, p = 0.03), and -1,9 mmHg (95% CI: -3-3 to -0.4, p = 0.0093), respectively, in favor of the active treatment for 8 h post- dose. No significant differences between the treatments were seen in brachial or aortic augmentation index, pulse wave velocity, or markers of RAS. Urinary excretion of cGMP, the second messenger of endothelial nitric oxide, was higher in the active group vs. placebo (p = 0.01). The results indicate that a single dose of a fermented milk product containing Ile-Pro-Pro and Val-Pro-Pro and plant sterols acutely lowers brachial SBP and DBP in mildly hypertensive subjects. © 2011 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.


Maenpaa J.,Santen Oy | Volotinen-Maja M.,Medcare Oy | Kautiainen H.,University of Helsinki | Neuvonen M.,University of Helsinki | And 3 more authors.
Drug Metabolism and Disposition | Year: 2014

Although ophthalmic timolol is generally well tolerated, a significant fraction of topically administered timolol can be systemically absorbed. We investigated the effect of the strong CYP2D6 inhibitor paroxetine on the pharmacokinetics of timolol after ophthalmic administration. In a four-phase crossover study, 12 healthy volunteers ingested either paroxetine (20 mg) or placebo daily for 3 days. In phases 1-2, timolol 0.1% gel, and in phases 3-4, timolol 0.5% drops were administered to both eyes. Paroxetine increased the plasma concentrations of timolol with both timolol formulations to a similar degree. The geometric mean ratio (95% confidence interval) of timolol peak concentration was 1.53-fold (1.23-1.91) with 0.1% timolol and 1.49-fold (0.94-2.36) with 0.5% timolol, and that of timolol area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) from time 0 to 12 hours was 1.61 -fold (1.26- to 2.06-fold) and 1.78-fold (1.21 -2.62), respectively. During paroxetine administration, six subjects on 0.5% timolol drops, but none on 0.1% timolol gel, had plasma timolol concentrations exceeding 0.7 ng/ml, which can cause systemic adverse effects in patients at risk. There was a positive correlation between the AUC from time 0 to 13 hours of paroxetine and the placebo phase AUC from time 0 to infinity of timolol after timolol 0.5% drops (P < 0.05), and a nonsignificant trend after timolol 0.1% gel, consistent with the role of CYP2D6 in the metabolism of both agents. In the orthostatic test, heart rate immediately after upright standing was significantly lower (P < 0.05) during the paroxetine phase than during the placebo phase at 1 and 3 hours after 0.5% timolol dosing. In conclusion, paroxetine and other CYP2D6 inhibitors can have a clinically important interaction with ophthalmic timolol, particularly when patients are using 0.5% timolol formulations. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.


Turpeinen A.M.,Valio Ltd. R and D | Ikonen M.,Valio Ltd. R and D | Kivimaki A.S.,University of Helsinki | Kautiainen H.,Medcare Oy | And 2 more authors.
Food and Function | Year: 2012

Lifestyle intervention is recommended as the primary treatment for mild hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. We studied the effects of a spread containing bioactive milk peptides IPP and VPP, as well as plant sterols, on cardiovascular risk factors in 104 hypertensive, hypercholesterolemic subjects in a randomised, placebo-controlled double-blind intervention. Middle-aged subjects consumed 20 g day-1 of a spread containing 4.2 mg of IPP and VPP as well as 2 g of plant sterols for 10 weeks after a 2 week run-in period. Blood pressure was measured at home 3 times a week. Office blood Pressure and 24 h ambulatory blood pressure measurements were performed at the end of the run-in and intervention periods. Blood samples were analysed for serum lipids, plasma glucose and inflammation markers. A significant decrease (-4.1 mmHg vs. -0.5 mmHg, p = 0.007) in systolic blood Pressure was seen in the active group, compared to placebo at home measurements. Office blood Pressure and 24 h nighttime or daytime ambulatory systolic or diastolic pressure did not differ between the groups. Total (-0.16 vs. 0.25 mmol 1-1 p = 0.005) and LDL cholesterol (-0.16 vs. 0.18 mmol 1-1 p = 0.006) decreased significantly in the active group compared to the placebo. No significant differences between groups were seen for plasma glucose or inflammation markers. The results thus suggest that milk peptides IPP and VPP and plant sterols, in a low-fat spread matrix, produce a clinically significant reduction in systolic blood pressure as well as serum total and LDL cholesterol without adverse effects. Functional foods that affect 2 major risk factors offer a safe and convenient way to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease by supporting lifestyle intervention. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.

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