McHenry County Conservation District

Richmond, IL, United States

McHenry County Conservation District

Richmond, IL, United States
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Sethuraman A.,Iowa State University | McGaugh S.E.,Duke University | Becker M.L.,Iowa State University | Chandler C.H.,State University of New York at Oswego | And 9 more authors.
Conservation Genetics | Year: 2014

Blanding's turtle (Emys blandingii) has declined substantially in North America due to anthropogenic activities, leaving populations smaller and increasingly fragmented spatially. We sampled 212 turtles to evaluate variation at eight microsatellite loci within and among 18 populations of E. blandingii across its primary range in the midwestern United States (Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska). All loci and populations were highly polymorphic. Our analyses also detected considerable genetic structure within and among the sampled localities, and revealed ancestral gene flow of E. blandingii in this region north and east from an ancient refugium in the central Great Plains, concordant with post-glacial recolonization timescales. The data further implied unexpected 'links' between geographically disparate populations in Nebraska and Illinois. Our study encourages conservation decisions to be mindful of the genetic uniqueness of populations of E. blandingii across its primary range. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Urbanek R.E.,Southern Illinois University Carbondale | Nielsen C.K.,Southern Illinois University Carbondale | Davenport M.A.,University of Minnesota | Woodson B.D.,McHenry County Conservation District
Journal of Wildlife Management | Year: 2015

Disparity among natural resource agencies and the public often arises when white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are managed in suburban areas. To resolve conflicts, managers require information as to why public constituents deem deer management methods acceptable. We surveyed 660 residents in a suburban Illinois county to evaluate attitudes toward 5 deer management methods: archery hunts, gun hunts, sharpshooting, fertility control, and no management. We used the expectancy-value model to determine beliefs and desires regarding outcomes of deer management methods that drove respondent acceptance and rejection toward deer management regimes. We then used multinomial logistic regression models to determine which public beliefs and desires regarding outcomes of each deer management method predicted acceptance of each method. Attitudes of respondents who accepted and rejected each deer management method differed from respondents who were neutral toward the methods (F2,215=3.59-17.93; 0.001≥P≤0.029). The variables most influencing beliefs toward lethal methods regarded whether deer will suffer an inhumane or unnatural death due to the management method (Akaike relative weight ω≥0.95). Beliefs that damage to personal property from deer will decrease drove the acceptance of archery hunts and professional sharpshooting (ω≥0.95). Beliefs regarding the number of deer-vehicle collisions decreasing and deer dying an unnatural death had the strongest support for predicting a person's acceptance or rejection of fertility control (ω=0.98). The desire for a low-cost management technique and deer numbers to remain the same or increase were the strongest predictors for accepting no deer management (ω=0.96). Although the expectancy-value model offers the framework to identify attitudinal disparities among citizens who accept and reject deer management methods, not all of the variables in each model set provided further information on why attitudes toward each deer management method differed among residents. Understanding respondent beliefs and desires regarding outcomes of deer management methods will ultimately allow managers to guide education, resolve some management disputes, and aid in future management decisions that may increase the effectiveness of a deer management regime. © 2015 The Wildlife Society. © The Wildlife Society, 2015.


Urbanek R.E.,Southern Illinois University Carbondale | Nielsen C.K.,Southern Illinois University Carbondale | Davenport M.A.,University of Minnesota | Woodson B.D.,McHenry County Conservation District
Human Dimensions of Wildlife | Year: 2012

Natural resource agencies and the public often agree on reasons to manage white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in suburban areas; however, there is frequent disparity regarding which deer management method is most acceptable. We surveyed 660 residents around 22 conservation areas in a suburban Illinois county to evaluate the acceptance and the potential for conflict regarding five deer management methods countywide, in urban and rural areas, and in high (≥11 deer/km2) and low (≤9 deer/km2) deer density areas. Archery hunting was the most acceptable method followed by gun hunting, sharpshooting, and fertility control; conducting no deer management was unacceptable (p <.001). Archery hunting and no deer management had the least conflict among residents; fertility control had the most conflict (.001 ≥ p ≤.010). We recommend managers conduct surveys that incorporate public conflict regarding deer management methods to gain information that may guide education and resolve management disputes. © 2012 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


Urbanek R.E.,Southern Illinois University Carbondale | Nielsen C.K.,Southern Illinois University Carbondale | Davenport M.A.,University of Minnesota | Woodson B.D.,McHenry County Conservation District
Human Dimensions of Wildlife | Year: 2013

As deer management activities increase in developed areas, managers require information regarding which factors contribute to deer acceptance capacity. We surveyed Illinois residents in a suburban county where deer have been proactively managed since 2001 to determine respondent characteristics and perceptions, beliefs, and feelings regarding deer that contribute to public perceptions of deer density. Almost half of the respondents perceived the number of deer as "perfect." We used polytomous regression with AICc model selection to identify variables that contributed to a respondent's perception of deer density. The most parsimonious model (AICc ω =.97) indicated a respondent's perception of changes in deer density, damage to personal property, and the respondent's general feelings regarding deer drove the perceptions of too many or too few deer (as opposed to the perfect number). This article exemplifies the complexity of deer acceptance capacity and aids managers in understanding public perceptions regarding suburban deer density. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

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