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News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Who hasn't lived through the frustrating experience of being without a phone after forgetting to recharge it? This could one day be a thing of the past thanks to technology being developed by Hydro-Québec and McGill University. Lithium-ion batteries have allowed the rapid proliferation of all kinds of mobile devices such as phones, tablets and computers. These tools however require frequent re-charging because of the limited energy density of their batteries. "With smart phones now, you can basically carry your whole office in that device, they are loaded with all sorts of applications so you need a lot of power to use it everyday and sometimes, you don't have access to a plug to recharge," explains Professor George P. Demopoulos, chair of Mining and Materials Engineering at McGill University. This has led to the development of portable solar chargers but these hybrid devices are difficult to miniaturize due to their complex circuitry and packaging issues. To solve this problem, scientists at McGill University and the Hydro-Québec's research institute are working on a single device capable of harvesting and storing energy using light. In other words, a self-charging battery. A novel concept presented in a Nature Communications paper by Professor Demopoulos and researchers at Hydro-Québec paves the way to these so-called light-charged batteries. The study shows that a standard cathode from a lithium-ion battery can be "sensitized" to light by incorporating photo-harvesting dye molecules. "In other words," says Dr. Andrea Paolella, the study's lead author and researcher at Hydro-Québec, "our research team was able to simulate a charging process using light as a source of energy." Scientists will now have to build an anode, the storage component, which will close the device's circuit, allowing energy produced by the cathode described in Nature Communications to be transferred and stored. If they succeed, they will have built the world's first 100% self-charging lithium-ion battery. The research team is already working on phase two of this project, thanks to a $564,000 grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. "We have done half of the job," says Professor Demopoulos, co-senior author of the paper with Hydro-Québec's Dr. Karim Zaghib, a world leading expert on batteries. "We know that we can design the electrode that absorbs light. "This grant will give us the opportunity to bridge the gap and demonstrate that this new concept of a light-chargeable battery is possible." "I'm an optimist and I think we can get a fully working device," says Paolella, who is also a former post-doctoral student from McGill. "Theoretically speaking, our goal is to develop a new hybrid solar-battery system, but depending on the power it can generate when we miniaturize it, we can imagine applications for portable devices such as phones". "Hydro-Québec has a strong global position with regard to the development of innovative, high-performance and safe battery materials," says Karim Zaghib Director - Energy Storage and Conservation at IREQ, Hydro-Québec's research institute. While it may take a few years to complete the second phase of the project, Professor Demopoulos believes this "passive form of charging" could play an important role in portable devices of the future...


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

For children born of wartime rape, peacetime doesn’t always bring relief or an end to violence. These children often endure continued brutality. This finding comes from a new study of children born to mothers abducted, held captive, and sexually violated by members of the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA). Joseph Kony led this rebel group during the civil war in northern Uganda from 1986 to 2007. Because the perspectives of children born of wartime rape has gotten little attention, researchers from McGill University joined forces with Watye Ki Gen, a collective of women whom the LRA abducted and held in captivity. Together, they interviewed 60 children and young people born within the LRA and currently living in northern Uganda. Participants in this study were between the ages of 12 and 19 at the time of the interviews. Many had spent their formative years in captivity, ranging from a few months after being born to seven years. To supplement interviews and focus groups and to enable participants to express themselves in multiple forms, the youth also had the opportunity to participate in an arts-based workshop. When asked to draw their family before and after the war, children often drew themselves and their siblings with sad faces in post-war drawings. When questioned about this, children explained that in many ways they felt their lives were actually better during the war. This surprising finding, published in Child Abuse & Neglect, is a result of multiple forms of violence, stigma, rejection, social exclusion, and socioeconomic marginalization endured by children born in LRA captivity, explains Myriam Denov, lead author of the study and professor at McGill’s School of Social Work. “The fact that children and youth identify the state of war and captivity—when violence, upheaval, starvation, deprivation, and ongoing terror were at its height—as better than life during peacetime is highly disconcerting and demonstrates the extent of their perceived post-war marginalization,” says Denov, the author of Child Soldiers: Sierra Leone’s Revolutionary United Front (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Youths interviewed for the study—some of whom shared the same father, LRA leader Joseph Kony—often articulated that “war was better than peace” because during the conflict they felt a greater sense of family cohesion and status within the LRA. “Life is hard here because people stigmatize us…they have turned their hate against us…In my family, they hate the three of us who were born in captivity…My uncle beats us and said he would kill us. He doesn’t want rebel children, Kony children, at home,” explained one of the participants. The findings underscore the need for support services to reverse the perception that war is better than peace. Specifically, youths stressed the need for livelihood programs targeting their socioeconomic marginalization, support for school fees, psychosocial support, and community sensitization and reconciliation programs. Funding for the research came from the Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Price Law Firm, who are personal injury lawyers in Panama City, Fl, would like to introduce the newest member of their Attorney trial team; Eric Van Loock. Eric Van Loock, a former prosecutor in multiple jurisdictions, has joined The Price Law Firm as an Associate Attorney. His practice will focus on assisting clients in personal injury cases and trial practice. Mr. Van Loock was born and raised in Mobile, Alabama, where he attended McGill-Toolen Catholic High School and the University of South Alabama, where he took courses under the BSN nursing program. Mr. Van Loock’s extensive medical training and education makes him the ideal candidate for handling serious automobile and trucking accident cases with significant injuries. After graduation from the Cumberland School of Law in 2004, Mr. Van Loock was admitted to the Alabama Bar in 2005, the Florida Bar in 2009 and the Alaska Bar in 2013. Mr. Van Loock served as an Assistant State Attorney in Panama City, FL from 2009 to 2012 and subsequently served as an Assistant District Attorney in both Barrow and Fairbanks, AK. Over the course of his career Mr. Van Loock prosecuted cases in the juvenile, misdemeanor and felony divisions including several successful jury trials and Grand Jury presentations. Mr. Van Loock ended his tenure in public service to help the people in his own community in Panama City, FL, where he now calls home. While handling hundreds of cases and trials, working thousands of hours in the courtroom, Mr. Van Loock has proven to be a formidable challenge to insurance companies who seek to deny his clients’ claims as a result of motorcycle accidents, auto accidents and trucking accidents. With medical training and extensive trial experience, Mr. Van Loock evaluates each case with an eye for detail. Whether it be herniated or bulging discs, typical spinal injuries from rear end collisions, or more serious traumatic brain injuries, it is critical for an attorney to evaluate each unique case with a trained eye, like Mr. Van Loock’s. Every injury and wrongful death case is different, and Mr. Van Loock’s training, education and experience helps his clients throughout the complex legal process. The Price Law Firm and our clients are pleased to announce this addition to the staff and look forward to serving many more people in the years to come! The Price Law Firm prides themselves on their dedication and commitment to every case they handle. The client always comes first, and it is our goal to strongly pursue the optimum recovery for each and every client, instead of fast devalued settlements. At The Price Law Firm, our team devotes time and resources to each case to ensure justice and fairness for those who are injured. The Price Law Firm are specialized Car Accident Lawyers in Panama City and work tirelessly to obtain the optimum recovery for each and every client.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

More than 90% of Earth’s continental crust is made up of silica-rich minerals, such as feldspar and quartz. But where did this silica-enriched material come from? And could it provide a clue in the search for life on other planets? Conventional theory holds that all of the early Earth’s crustal ingredients were formed by volcanic activity. Now, however, McGill University earth scientists Don Baker and Kassandra Sofonio have published a theory with a novel twist: some of the chemical components of this material settled onto Earth’s early surface from the steamy atmosphere that prevailed at the time. First, a bit of ancient geochemical history: Scientists believe that a Mars-sized planetoid plowed into the proto-Earth around 4.5 billion years ago, melting the Earth and turning it into an ocean of magma. In the wake of that impact – which also created enough debris to form the moon -- the Earth’s surface gradually cooled until it was more or less solid. Baker’s new theory, like the conventional one, is based on that premise. The atmosphere following that collision, however, consisted of high-temperature steam that dissolved rocks on the Earth’s immediate surface -- “much like how sugar is dissolved in coffee,” Baker explains. This is where the new wrinkle comes in. “These dissolved minerals rose to the upper atmosphere and cooled off, and then these silicate materials that were dissolved at the surface would start to separate out and fall back to Earth in what we call a silicate rain.” To test this theory, Baker and co-author Kassandra Sofonio, a McGill undergraduate research assistant, spent months developing a series of laboratory experiments designed to mimic the steamy conditions on early Earth. A mixture of bulk silicate earth materials and water was melted in air at 1,550 degrees Celsius, then ground to a powder. Small amounts of the powder, along with water, were then enclosed in gold palladium capsules, placed in a pressure vessel and heated to about 727 degrees Celsius and 100 times Earth’s surface pressure to simulate conditions in the Earth's atmosphere about 1 million years after the moon-forming impact. After each experiment, samples were rapidly quenched and the material that had been dissolved in the high temperature steam analyzed. The experiments were guided by other scientists’ previous experiments on rock-water interactions at high pressures, and by the McGill team’s own preliminary calculations, Baker notes. Even so, “we were surprised by the similarity of the dissolved silicate material produced by the experiments” to that found in the Earth’s crust. Their resulting paper, published in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters, posits a new theory of “aerial metasomatism” -– a term coined by Sofonio to describe the process by which silica minerals condensed and fell back to earth over about a million years, producing some of the earliest rock specimens known today. “Our experiment shows the chemistry of this process,” and could provide scientists with important clues as to which exoplanets might have the capacity to harbor life Baker says. “This time in early Earth's history is still really exciting,” he adds. “A lot of people think that life started very soon after these events that we're talking about. This is setting up the stages for the Earth being ready to support life.”


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

More than 90% of Earth's continental crust is made up of silica-rich minerals, such as feldspar and quartz. But where did this silica-enriched material come from? And could it provide a clue in the search for life on other planets? Conventional theory holds that all of the early Earth's crustal ingredients were formed by volcanic activity. Now, however, McGill University earth scientists Don Baker and Kassandra Sofonio have published a theory with a novel twist: some of the chemical components of this material settled onto Earth's early surface from the steamy atmosphere that prevailed at the time. First, a bit of ancient geochemical history: Scientists believe that a Mars-sized planetoid plowed into the proto-Earth around 4.5 billion years ago, melting the Earth and turning it into an ocean of magma. In the wake of that impact -- which also created enough debris to form the moon -- the Earth's surface gradually cooled until it was more or less solid. Baker's new theory, like the conventional one, is based on that premise. The atmosphere following that collision, however, consisted of high-temperature steam that dissolved rocks on the Earth's immediate surface -- "much like how sugar is dissolved in coffee," Baker explains. This is where the new wrinkle comes in. "These dissolved minerals rose to the upper atmosphere and cooled off, and then these silicate materials that were dissolved at the surface would start to separate out and fall back to Earth in what we call a silicate rain." To test this theory, Baker and co-author Kassandra Sofonio, a McGill undergraduate research assistant, spent months developing a series of laboratory experiments designed to mimic the steamy conditions on early Earth. A mixture of bulk silicate earth materials and water was melted in air at 1,550 degrees Celsius, then ground to a powder. Small amounts of the powder, along with water, were then enclosed in gold palladium capsules, placed in a pressure vessel and heated to about 727 degrees Celsius and 100 times Earth's surface pressure to simulate conditions in the Earth's atmosphere about 1 million years after the moon-forming impact. After each experiment, samples were rapidly quenched and the material that had been dissolved in the high temperature steam analyzed. The experiments were guided by other scientists' previous experiments on rock-water interactions at high pressures, and by the McGill team's own preliminary calculations, Baker notes. Even so, "we were surprised by the similarity of the dissolved silicate material produced by the experiments" to that found in the Earth's crust. Their resulting paper, published in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters, posits a new theory of "aerial metasomatism" -- a term coined by Sofonio to describe the process by which silica minerals condensed and fell back to earth over about a million years, producing some of the earliest rock specimens known today. "Our experiment shows the chemistry of this process," and could provide scientists with important clues as to which exoplanets might have the capacity to harbor life Baker says. "This time in early Earth's history is still really exciting," he adds. "A lot of people think that life started very soon after these events that we're talking about. This is setting up the stages for the Earth being ready to support life." Funding for the research was provided by an NSERC Discovery grant to Baker and an NSERC Summer Undergraduate Research Assistant grant to Sofonio. "A metasomatic mechanism for the formation of Earth's earliest evolved crust," Don R. Baker, Kassandra Sofonio, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 1 April 2017. http://www.


VAUDREUIL-DORION, QUÉBEC--(Marketwired - 27 avril 2017) - Immunotec inc., une société de vente directe et un chef de file dans le secteur de la nutrition (TSX CROISSANCE:IMM) (« Immunotec » ou la « Société ») a annoncé les résultats de son assemblée annuelle d'actionnaires tenue aujourd'hui (l' « assemblée »). À l'assemblée, les actionnaires ont approuvé la nomination de tous les administrateurs proposés, ceci comprenant tous les administrateurs actuels autres que Dieter Beer, qui a choisi de ne pas se représenter à cette élection pour des raisons personnelles et qui a été remplacé par Lina Roti. Les actionnaires ont aussi approuvé la nomination de Pricewaterhouse Coopers s.r.l./s.e.n.c.r.l., à titre d'auditeurs de la Société. Lina Roti est membre de Comptables professionnels agréés (CPA) Canada et elle est titulaire d'un baccalauréat en arts (majeure en mathématiques) (1985) de l'Université Concordia et d'un diplôme de deuxième cycle en comptabilité publique (1989) de l'Université McGill. Elle offre des services de contrôleur et de directrice financière à plusieurs sociétés, essentiellement dans les secteurs des placements immobiliers et de la gestion. Soulignant la contribution de Dieter Beer à la Société, Rod Budd, président du conseil d'administration, a déclaré : « Nous souhaitons remercier Dieter Beer, co-fondateur d'Immunotec, pour ses années de précieux services au conseil d'administration. Il a joué un rôle important dans l'implantation et le maintien de la vision d'Immunotec afin de positionner ImmunocalMD en tant que choix nutritionnel global, afin d'améliorer plusieurs autres vies avec ce produit incroyable basé sur la recherche. Nous sommes confiants que son héritage sera poursuivi par Immuno Holding S.A. de C.V., et nous attendons avec intérêt la conclusion de l'acquisition proposée d'Immunotec. » L'assemblée extraordinaire des actionnaires d'Immunotec afin d'approuver la transaction avec Immuno Holding S.A. de C.V. est prévue le jeudi, 11 mai 2017 à 10 heures (heure de Montréal) aux bureaux de la Société situés au 300, Joseph-Carrier, Vaudreuil-Dorion, Québec. La circulaire de sollicitation de procurations par la direction relative à cette assemblée a été transmise par la poste aux actionnaires de la Société et peut être consultée sous le profil d'Immunotec à www.sedar.com. Immunotec est une entreprise canadienne qui développe, fabrique, met en marché et vend des produits nutritifs basés sur la recherche par l'entremise de canaux de vente directe aux consommateurs au Canada, aux États-Unis, au Mexique, en République dominicaine, au Royaume-Uni et en Irlande. L'entreprise offre une gamme complète de produits de nutrition, de soins de la peau et de bien-être, qui visent la santé, la gestion du poids, l'énergie et la forme physique. Consultez le site www.immunotec.com pour en savoir plus. L'entreprise dépose ses documents d'information continue, y compris ses résultats annuels, dans la base de données SEDAR à www.sedar.com et sur le site Web de l'entreprise à www.immunotec.com. Les actions de l'entreprise sont cotées à la Bourse sous le symbole IMM. Ni la Bourse de croissance TSX ni son fournisseur de services de réglementation (tel que ce terme est défini dans les politiques de la Bourse de croissance TSX) n'engagent leur responsabilité à l'égard de l'adéquation ou de l'exactitude du présent communiqué. Le présent communiqué contient des énoncés qui constituent de l'« information prospective » ou des « énoncés prospectifs » (collectivement, de l'« information prospective ») au sens des lois en valeurs mobilières applicables. L'information prospective se reconnaît souvent, mais pas toujours, par l'utilisation de mots tels que « prévoir », « croire », « s'attendre à », « planifier », « avoir l'intention de », « cibler », « projeter », « pourrait », « devra », « devrait » ou des mots similaires laissant entendre la possibilité d'issues futures ou un libellé laissant entendre la possibilité de perspectives données. L'information prospective incluse dans le présent communiqué est fondée sur les croyances actuelles de la Société ainsi que sur les hypothèses posées par la Société et sur l'information dont elle dispose actuellement. Bien que la Société considère que ces hypothèses sont raisonnables en fonction des renseignements dont elle dispose actuellement, elles pourraient se révéler inexactes. De par sa nature, l'information prospective incluse dans le présent communiqué comporte des risques et des incertitudes inhérents, tant généraux que spécifiques, et des risques que les prédictions, les prévisions, les projections et d'autres informations prospectives ne soient pas atteintes. Le lecteur est mis en garde quant au fait de ne pas se fier indûment à la présente information prospective étant donné que divers facteurs importants pourraient faire en sorte que les résultats actuels diffèrent sensiblement de ceux qui sont exprimés dans cette information prospective. Ces facteurs comprennent notamment les risques liés à l'obtention des approbations judiciaires, réglementaires et des porteurs de titres requises afin de permettre la réalisation de l'arrangement conformément à ses modalités. Le lecteur est mis en garde quant au fait que la liste de facteurs qui précède pouvant avoir une incidence sur les résultats futurs n'est pas exhaustive. Pour obtenir des renseignements à l'égard d'autres risques et incertitudes connus et d'autres facteurs importants qui pourraient faire en sorte que les résultats réels diffèrent sensiblement de ceux qui sont prévus dans l'information prospective, veuillez-vous reporter à la rubrique intitulée « Risques et incertitudes » figurant dans le rapport de gestion le plus récent d'Immunotec, qu'on peut consulter à www.sedar.com. Lorsqu'ils se fient à de l'information prospective pour prendre des décisions relativement à Immunotec, les investisseurs et d'autres personnes devraient considérer soigneusement les facteurs qui précèdent et d'autres incertitudes et événements potentiels. En outre, l'information prospective contenue dans le présent communiqué est donnée à la date du présent communiqué, et la Société ne s'engage nullement à mettre à jour publiquement ou à réviser l'une ou l'autre des informations prospectives, que ce soit par suite d'une nouvelle information, d'événements futurs ou autrement, sauf comme cela peut être requis par les lois applicables. L'information prospective contenue dans le présent communiqué renvoie expressément à cette mise en garde.


News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

On July 28, 2017, Proud Lake State Park will be donned by some of the countries most talented and sought after yoga teachers, artists and musicians for the 2nd Annual Barefoot & Free Yoga (& Music) Festival. Barefoot & Free Yoga Festival (Festival) is a regional destination event that features national and local yoga teachers, healing artists, and a music lineup made up of national bands and DJ’s. Attended by over 600 yogis and non-yogis in 2016 for its first annual, Barefoot & Free Yoga Festival In The Woods is back and bigger than ever. “FINALLY! A Yoga Festival in Michigan! I am so excited to go again this summer – there are so many brilliant yoga teachers all in one place! It truly is a yogi’s dream to experience an entire weekend of yoga, meditation, music, great food, artsy vendors and hanging out with like-minded people. I also like that the schedule offered something for everyone; whether you are just starting yoga or have been practicing for over a decade. The location is perfect too, super tall and beautiful trees with a beautiful lake to paddle board or swim!” – Michelle Trame, 2016 Barefoot & Free Attendee The Festival is a full weekend of nature, camping, yoga, music, healing arts, talks and classes. Nestled in a Pure Michigan setting and just minutes outside of the Detroit area, the Festival has something for everyone. Providing the opportunity for friends and families to partake in either the festivities or just the enjoyment of the 4,700 acre state park. The venue, Proud Lake, has kayaking, canoeing and SUP boarding, fishing, mountain biking, a boat launch, camping and picnic areas. The Festival lineup includes 28 yoga teachers and instructors with a vast range of technique and talent; Bibi McGill, Patrick Beach, Irene Pappas, Katie Silcox, Amber Cook, and Todd Tesen are just a few. Featured musicians include the Desert Dwellers, DJ Drez and DJ Tasha Blank will be spinning interactive bass-heavy sounds, and other musical acts pulling from a wide range of influences, including world beat, synth pop, desert romance and more. The Festival healers will be offering workshops, teachings and ceremonies. A full lineup of teachers, instructors, musicians and healers can be found on the Festival website http://www.barefootandfreeyoga.com/. Festival kickoff is Friday, July 28, 2017 at 4PM. Classes and performances will follow throughout the weekend. Yoga and music (music passes only are available) can be purchased as day or weekend passes directly from the Festival website (http://www.barefootandfreeyoga.com/passes/). Kids 12 and under are free, and activities and yoga for kids will be offered, along with childcare. Local retail and food vendors will be on-site selling their homemade/handmade products and healthy eats. “Barefoot & Free is an opportunity for people to experience different stylings of yoga in a totally free environment. It also allows those new to yoga a great sampling of classes and instructors. And pairing the yoga festival with a fabulous music line-up to celebrate the experience in the Michigan outdoors, makes us unique to many other festivals in Michigan.” -Beth James, Barefoot & Free Festival Founder ABOUT BAREFOOT & FREE: Barefoot & Free, A Yoga Festival In The Woods was founded by Beth James, a Michigan native and yoga teacher. Beth’s passion for yoga, her love for Michigan and her childhood memories of Proud Lake State Park, reignited her dream to bring something special to the woods. Beth travels and attends international festivals, as well as sources the best talent for Barefoot & Free to ensure the greatest and most unique experience is had by all. To contact Beth James, please call (248) 818-7182 or email: barefootandfreeyoga(at)gmail.com.


Receive press releases from Ecotone, Inc.: By Email Center for Watershed Protection Honors Ecotone, Inc for Innovation and Leadership - Maryland’s Fast-Growing Ecological Restoration Company Receives Industry Recognition The Center for Watershed Protection has recognized Scott McGill of Maryland based ecological restoration company, Ecotone, Inc with its 2017 Innovation and Leadership in Watershed Protection and Restoration award for partnering with designers, researchers and local governments to advance science-based approaches to stormwater and watershed management projects. Baltimore, MD, May 03, 2017 --( In total, the Center for Watershed Protection has recognized eight of its partner organizations as recipients of its 2017 Innovation and Leadership in Watershed Protection and Restoration awards for developing and deploying best practices to enhance water quality. The recipients were named at the Center's annual conference marking the organization's 25th year of being a national leader in stormwater management and watershed planning. "The Center for Watershed Protection wants every community in our country to have clean water and healthy natural resources," said Hye Yeong Kwon, executive director of the Center for Watershed Protection. "In order to achieve that vision, nonprofit, private and government organizations must work together and demonstrate innovation, initiative and excellence. This award recognizes emerging leaders and visionaries from across the country who have used innovative practices to improve our water." "We are thrilled and honored to receive this award from an organization so well respected and impactful as the Center for Watershed Protection," said Scott McGill, Founder and CEO of Ecotone. "We are proud of our employees and the important ecological restoration work that they are putting into practice into our local streams. We will continue to strive to be the model for sustainable and innovative restoration within the Chesapeake Bay watershed and the greater Mid-Atlantic region." The Center for Watershed Protection Inc. is a nonprofit organization dedicated to fostering responsible land and water management through applied research, direct assistance to communities, award-winning training, and access to a network of experienced professionals. It was founded in 1992 and is headquartered in Howard County with several offices throughout the country. Founded in 1998, Ecotone is an environmental restoration company that designs and builds sustainable ecological systems. Ecotone provides full-delivery ecosystem restoration and mitigation, as well as restoration design, consulting, and construction services all under one roof. Media Contact: Ritesh Seth Phone: (410) 420 2600 Email: rseth@ecotoneinc.com Web: www.ecotoneinc.com Baltimore, MD, May 03, 2017 --( PR.com )-- The Center for Watershed Protection has recognized Scott McGill of Maryland based ecological restoration company, Ecotone, Inc . with its 2017 Innovation and Leadership in Watershed Protection and Restoration award for partnering with designers, researchers and local governments to advance science-based approaches to stormwater and watershed management projects.In total, the Center for Watershed Protection has recognized eight of its partner organizations as recipients of its 2017 Innovation and Leadership in Watershed Protection and Restoration awards for developing and deploying best practices to enhance water quality. The recipients were named at the Center's annual conference marking the organization's 25th year of being a national leader in stormwater management and watershed planning."The Center for Watershed Protection wants every community in our country to have clean water and healthy natural resources," said Hye Yeong Kwon, executive director of the Center for Watershed Protection. "In order to achieve that vision, nonprofit, private and government organizations must work together and demonstrate innovation, initiative and excellence. This award recognizes emerging leaders and visionaries from across the country who have used innovative practices to improve our water.""We are thrilled and honored to receive this award from an organization so well respected and impactful as the Center for Watershed Protection," said Scott McGill, Founder and CEO of Ecotone. "We are proud of our employees and the important ecological restoration work that they are putting into practice into our local streams. We will continue to strive to be the model for sustainable and innovative restoration within the Chesapeake Bay watershed and the greater Mid-Atlantic region."The Center for Watershed Protection Inc. is a nonprofit organization dedicated to fostering responsible land and water management through applied research, direct assistance to communities, award-winning training, and access to a network of experienced professionals. It was founded in 1992 and is headquartered in Howard County with several offices throughout the country.Founded in 1998, Ecotone is an environmental restoration company that designs and builds sustainable ecological systems. Ecotone provides full-delivery ecosystem restoration and mitigation, as well as restoration design, consulting, and construction services all under one roof.Media Contact:Ritesh Seth Phone:(410) 420 2600Email: rseth@ecotoneinc.comWeb: www.ecotoneinc.com Ecotone receives award for innovation and leadership Center for Watershed Protection Honors Ecotone for Innovation and Leadership - Maryland's Fast-Growing Ecological Restoration Company Receives Industry Recognition Filename: CWP-Ecotone-Award-PressRelease.pdf Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Ecotone, Inc.


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Summer beckons in Montana’s Big Sky Country where the living is easy, the fish are jumping in the Gallatin River and the Gallatin Mountain trails reach high into clear skies. Prime steaks are sizzling on the grill, horses are ready to ride and Yellowstone National Park is blooming with flowers and new wildlife. Big Sky is the real deal – an authentic Western experience that embraces the area’s spectacular scenery, outdoor activities and vivid history. The historic 320 Guest Ranch celebrates the season with new summer packages that combine the best of Big Sky with rustically luxurious accommodations, fine dining and an array of activities from horseback riding and fly fishing to tours of nearby Yellowstone National Park. The region has its cultured side - guests can visit Big Sky or Bozeman for local spas, specialty shops, boutiques and museums. Begun in 1898 and set on the banks of the Gallatin River, the 320 Guest Ranch offers 87 sleeping rooms that blend modern luxury and convenience in cabin accommodations, log homes and mountain chalets. The property offers superb dining at the 320 Steakhouse, with an emphasis on big game cuisine exquisitely prepared. The 320 Saloon is perfect for after-hours activities. Yellowstone, America’s most iconic National Park, is just minutes from the 320 Guest Ranch. The package includes five nights’ accommodation, all-day guided tours of each of Yellowstone’s Upper and Lower Loops (park pass extra), a two-hour horseback ride, tickets to the popular Wolf and Grizzly Discovery Center, fly-fishing lessons for up to three guests, one dinner in the 320 Steakhouse with a bottle of house wine and a Yellowstone field guidebook. Package prices start at $1578 for a Deluxe Log Cabin with two Queen Beds; $1771 for a cabin with fireplace and kitchen; $1940 in the historic McGill Cabin, and from $2541 in a Mountain Chalet. Cabins by the river are $2469 and a three-bedroom cabin $3298. Additional adults, $278 each; additional children under 12, $243 each. Guests enjoy a great getaway amidst the Best of the West. The Wild West Getaway includes one night’s lodging, a two-hour horseback ride and dinner for two at the 320 Steakhouse. Package prices range from $427 in a Deluxe Log Cabin with two Queen Beds; from $466 for a cabin with fireplace and kitchen. Cabins by the river are $605. Additional adult, $120 each, additional children under 12, $105. Big Sky Country is known for its innovative local cuisine and the menu at the 320 Steakhouse showcases top-grade Montana beef, wild game and fish fresh from the Gallatin River. The Gourmet Getaway features one night’s lodging and dinner in the 320 Steakhouse with a bottle of house wine. The Gourmet Getaway Package is priced at $321 in a Deluxe Cabin with two queen beds; $360 for a cabin with fireplace and kitchen and $499 for a riverside cabin. Additional person, $55 each. To book the 320 Guest Ranch Summer of 2017 packages, visit http://www.320Ranch.com and click onto the "Reservations" link, or click onto https://secure.320ranch.com/iqreservations/asp/IQHome.asp Or call 1-800-243-0320. All packages are valid June 15, 2017 – September 15, 2017. Prices are based double adult occupancy and do not include gratuities or passes to Yellowstone Park. Montana’s premier year-round ranch destination, the 320 Guest Ranch is a historic property situated along two miles of the famed Gallatin River near Big Sky, Montana. Begun in 1898, the 320 Guest Ranch offers 87 sleeping rooms within 58 luxurious and modern cabin accommodations, log homes and mountain chalets. Many accommodations feature wood-burning fireplaces. The property offers superb dining at the 320 Steakhouse, with an emphasis on big game cuisine exquisitely prepared. The 320 Saloon is perfect for after-hours activities. The ranch provides facilities and concierge support services for events, social and leisure activities. Close to world-class downhill and cross country skiing at Big Sky Resort, 320 Guest Ranch offers a full range of seasonal recreational activities, such as horseback riding, trail hiking, rafting, sightseeing, mountain climbing, fly fishing (some of the world’s best), hayrides, sleigh rides, snowmobiling, and many more. On staff are experienced wranglers and horse experts, as well as a team of professionals who can assist in making a guest’s experience highly memorable. The property is located 12 miles from Big Sky, 5 miles from the boundary of Yellowstone National Park and 52 miles from Bozeman, Montana, and the Gallatin Field Airport. To learn more about 320 Guest Ranch, visit http://www.320Ranch.com.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

The season 3 debut of "Twin Peaks" is just a few weeks away, but new footage from the long-awaited continuation of the series has been hard to come by. On Thursday, Showtime teased hungry fans with a peek at some of the show's most popular characters as they appear 25 years after the events of the original. The short teaser re-introduces Big Ed Hurley (Everett McGill), Carl Rodd (Harry Dean Stanton), Sarah Palmer (Grace Zabriskie), Deputy Andy Brennan (Harry Goaz), Deputy Tommy "Hawk" Hill (Michael Horse) and FBI Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan). It's worth noting that Stanton appeared in the "Twin Peaks" tie-in movie "Fire Walk with Me" and not in the original television series. Each brief clip shows a seemingly mundane moment. Big Ed sits at a desk. Sarah Palmer pushes a shopping cart down the liquor aisle at a grocery store. Andy still sports the same up-swept haircut. There's no attempt to hide the passage of time. Their faces are worn and worried and the footage has an ominous feel. "Twin Peaks," with director David Lynch at the helm, returns on Showtime on May 21. With little to go on as far as teasers or trailers, we'll likely have to wait until then for the town's secrets to start revealing themselves.

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