MBL
Ina, Japan
MBL
Ina, Japan

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

MEXICO CITY--(BUSINESS WIRE)--FIBRA Macquarie México (FIBRAMQ) (BMV: FIBRAMQ), owner of one of the largest portfolios of industrial and retail/office property in Mexico, announced its financial and operating results for the quarter and twelve months ended December 31, 2016. “ In 2016 we delivered positive results across our operations, including a record level of leasing activity, which contributed to strong AFFO and NOI growth for the year. We also completed a refinancing program, which further enhanced our balance sheet and liquidity profile,” said Juan Monroy, FIBRA Macquarie’s chief executive officer. “ We remain focused on delivering the value, service and quality that our customers expect from FIBRA Macquarie. With an experienced team of local real estate professionals, and a dedication to our “Customer First” philosophy, we maintain close relationships with our customers and are confident in our ability to continue to fulfill their needs. Furthermore, we have a stable outlook and manageable 2017 lease expirations, allowing us to focus on incremental growth and value-add expansion and redevelopment opportunities across our industrial and retail/office portfolios.” FIBRAMQ’s total proportionally combined portfolio results were as follows: FIBRAMQ’s proportionally combined same store portfolio results were as follows: Note: GLA in FIBRAMQ’s same store portfolio includes completed expansions, and excludes GLA under redevelopment or subject to binding sale agreements, in respect of GLA in existence at 31 December 2015 and 2016. LTM is last twelve months. The following table summarizes the operational results for FIBRAMQ’s industrial portfolio during the quarter and year ended December 31, 2016 and the respective prior comparable periods. FIBRAMQ’s industrial portfolio’s occupancy rate at the end of the 2016 was 92.7%, up 90 basis points over the prior comparable period and up 10 basis points sequentially. Rental rates improved in the fourth quarter, with an average of US$4.48 per leased square meter per month, a 1.4% increase from the prior year. FIBRAMQ signed 35 leases in the fourth quarter comprising 2.3 million square feet of new and renewal leases during the quarter compared with 1.1 million square feet of new and renewal leases signed in the prior comparable period. Signed leases included 10 new leases totaling 733 thousand square feet, and 25 renewal leases totaling 1.5 million square feet. Notable new leases included a 226 thousand square foot lease to an existing customer, an automotive parts manufacturer that expanded its operations in Nuevo Laredo; an 85 thousand square foot lease with a plastic injection molding company in Chihuahua; and an 84 thousand square foot lease with an international soft drink and snack manufacturer in Guadalajara. Additionally, with its experienced team of local real estate professionals, FIBRAMQ continues to implement its “Customer First” strategy which is focused on deepening relationships with customers to encourage retention and to uncover additional opportunities. This includes seeking expansion opportunities to accommodate customers’ growing needs and create value in its portfolio. During the quarter, FIBRAMQ delivered a 215 thousand square foot expansion for Belden de Sonora’s industrial facility in Nogales. Renewal leases consisted of a broad representation of FIBRAMQ customers located across its geographic footprint. Customers included automotive parts suppliers, electronics and electrical equipment manufacturers and a paper processor, amongst others. During the fourth quarter, FIBRAMQ experienced a relatively high level of lease expirations. While there was an anticipated high level of customer move-outs arising from a range of customer-specific circumstances, retention improved to 74% in the quarter, which was 68% on a rolling twelve-month basis, a 300 basis points improvement from the prior quarter rolling twelve-month average. During the quarter, ten customers representing 527 thousand square feet of space vacated properties as planned lease terminations. In 2017, FIBRAMQ is well positioned with 14.1% of leased GLA scheduled to expire during the year, compared to 24.3% of leased GLA that expired or were opportunistic early renewals in 2016. The following table summarizes the proportionally combined results of operations for FIBRAMQ’s retail/office portfolio during the quarter and year ended December 31, 2016 and the respective prior comparable periods. FIBRAMQ increased its GLA, occupancy and average monthly rents versus the prior comparable period. At December 31, 2016, the retail/office portfolio’s occupancy increased by 30 basis points to 95.2% versus the prior comparable period and was up 50 basis points sequentially. FIBRAMQ signed 35 leases representing 20 thousand square meters, which is the retail/office portfolio’s strongest leasing quarter in the past two and half years. This activity included 31 new leases and 4 renewals. Notable new leases include two leases with Fábricas de Francia, a leading Mexican retailer, consisting of 6,800 square meters and 6,300 square meters at Tecámac Power Center and Tuxtepec shopping center, respectively. Both of these spaces required expansions, and FIBRAMQ added 10,600 square meters to accommodate these two new stores, which opened during the fourth quarter. At Magnocentro, FIBRAMQ signed two notable new leases including a 1,300 square meter lease with a leading, global fashion retailer, and a 600 square meter lease with a high traffic restaurant. The change in NOI year over the year was due primarily to an increase in the provision for doubtful debts in 2016 compared to 2015. The increase in provision for doubtful debts was as a result of taking a more conservative approach, rather than a higher bad debt experience, and was done in conjunction with taking a more diligent and systematic approach to collections. FIBRAMQ continues to evaluate property recycling opportunities to enhance the quality, operating efficiency and growth profile of its overall portfolio. FIBRAMQ also maintains an active pipeline of opportunities focusing on expansions and redevelopment of existing properties and selective development in core markets. During the fourth quarter, FIBRAMQ continued the construction of two such projects, both of which are expected to be completed during the second quarter of 2017. The first is the redevelopment and expansion of a 54 thousand square foot industrial facility in Ciudad Juárez. Additionally, FIBRAMQ continued construction of a new 145 thousand square foot industrial building in Reynosa where occupancy of its existing buildings was an average of 95% in 2016. Reynosa is an attractive industrial market with high demand and a solid level of leasing activity. FIBRAMQ completed the previously announced sale of two vacant properties in Matamoros totaling 205 thousand square feet during the quarter. These were vacant buildings and are not representative of the broader portfolio. As of December 31, 2016, FIBRAMQ had approximately Ps 18.9 billion of debt outstanding, Ps 2,896.3 million available on its undrawn revolving credit facility and Ps 637.7 million of unrestricted cash on hand. FIBRAMQ’s CNBV regulatory debt to total asset ratio was 39.2% and the regulatory DSCR ratio was 1.1x. During the fourth quarter, FIBRAMQ closed on a new Ps 1.2 billion, seven-year secured loan facility to opportunistically prepay another secured loan facility that was scheduled to mature in April 2017. The loan is secured with eight retail/office properties which are owned through a 50/50 joint venture with Grupo Frisa. In 2016, FIBRAMQ was active in repositioning its balance sheet. In total, these activities reduced FIBRAMQ’s weighted average cost of debt to 5.0% per annum, extended its weighted average tenor of debt outstanding to 4.7 years and increased the proportion of fixed rate debt as a percentage of total debt to 87.6%. FIBRAMQ also enhanced its liquidity with the upsizing of its revolving credit facility to US$254 million. FIBRAMQ’s debt capital is sourced through a diversified base of 13 local and foreign counterparties, including increased commitments from existing lenders. On February 22, 2017, FIBRAMQ declared a cash distribution for the quarter ended December 31, 2016, of Ps. 0.4400 per certificate. The distribution is expected to be paid on March 10, 2017 to holders of record on March 9, 2017. FIBRAMQ’s certificates will commence trading ex-distribution on March 7, 2017. The distribution of Ps.0.4400 per certificate reflects an AFFO payout ratio of 80.1% for the fourth quarter and 84.8% for the full year. The payment of cash distributions is subject to the approval of the board of directors of the Manager, the continued stable performance of the properties in the portfolio, and market conditions. FIBRA Macquarie is introducing its outlook for 2017. FIBRAMQ estimates total AFFO of between Ps. 2.13 and Ps. 2.18 per certificate in 2017. This 2017 AFFO guidance is based on the cash-generating capacity of its existing portfolio and assumes no new acquisitions or divestments, an average exchange rate of Ps. 20.5 per US dollar and no change to the 811,363,500 total certificates on issue. We maintain confidence in our core operations and expect the underlying fundamentals of both the industrial and retail/office segments to remain steady. FIBRAMQ will provide 2017 distribution guidance on or before the announcement of first quarter 2017 results in late April 2017. The board of directors of the Manager and management are assessing accretive investment opportunities, including expansions and redevelopments. This assessment is being made in the context of current market conditions and FIBRAMQ’s carry-forward tax loss position of Ps. 6.1 billion, which allows flexibility to be able to execute on pipeline opportunities using our most efficient source of capital, operating cash flow, over the medium term. “ Our key priority is to be good stewards of capital and focus on what is best for the enterprise and our certificate holders over the long-term to drive Net Asset Value growth,” said Mr. Monroy. With the recent change in FIBRA regulations to permit buy-backs of certificates, FIBRAMQ intends to complete all relevant approvals, including certificate holder approval at the 2017 AGM, to have the ability to launch a buy-back program. FIBRAMQ considers it to be prudent and in the best long term interests of investors to have in place maximum flexibility relating to all possible value-accretion opportunities, including an approved buy-back program. If such approvals are obtained, there is no current intent to re-purchase certificates given attractive investment alternatives. FIBRAMQ will host an earnings conference call and webcast presentation on Thursday, February 23, 2017 at 7:30 a.m. CT / 8:30 a.m. ET. The conference call, which will also be audio webcast, can be accessed online at www.fibramacquarie.com or by dialing toll free +1 (877) 304 8957. Callers from outside the United States may dial +1 (973) 638 3235. Please ask for the FIBRA Macquarie Fourth Quarter 2016 Earnings Call. An audio replay will be available by dialing +1-855-859-2056 or +1-404-537-3406 for callers outside the United States. The passcode for the replay is 66061563. A webcast archive of the conference call and a copy of FIBRAMQ’s financial information for the fourth quarter 2016 will also be available on FIBRAMQ’s website, http://www.fibramacquarie.com. For detailed charts, tables and definitions, please refer to the Fourth Quarter 2016 Supplementary Information materials located at http://www.fibramacquarie.com/investors/bolsa-mexicana-de-valoresfilings. FIBRA Macquarie México (FIBRA Macquarie) (BMV:FIBRAMQ) is a real estate investment trust (fideicomiso de inversión en bienes raíces), or FIBRA, listed on the Mexican Stock Exchange (Bolsa Mexicana de Valores) targeting industrial, retail and office real estate opportunities in Mexico, with a primary focus on stabilized income-producing properties. FIBRA Macquarie’s portfolio consists of 275 industrial properties and 17 retail/office properties, located in 24 cities across 19 Mexican states as of December 31, 2016. Nine of the retail/office properties are held through a 50/50 joint venture with Grupo Frisa. FIBRA Macquarie is managed by Macquarie México Real Estate Management, S.A. de C.V. which operates within the Macquarie Infrastructure and Real Assets division of Macquarie Group. For additional information about FIBRA Macquarie, please visit www.fibramacquarie.com. Macquarie Infrastructure and Real Assets is a business within the Macquarie Asset Management division of Macquarie Group and a global alternative asset manager focused on real estate, infrastructure, agriculture and energy assets. Macquarie Infrastructure and Real Assets has significant expertise over the entire investment lifecycle, with capabilities in investment sourcing, investment management, investment realization and investor relations. Established in 1996, Macquarie Infrastructure and Real Assets has approximately US$104.1 billion of total assets under management as of September 30, 2016. Macquarie Group (Macquarie) is a global provider of banking, financial, advisory, investment and funds management services. Macquarie's main business focus is making returns by providing a diversified range of services to clients. Macquarie acts on behalf of institutional, corporate and retail clients and counterparties around the world. Founded in 1969, Macquarie operates in over 27 countries. Macquarie employs over 13,800 people and has assets under management of more than $377 billion (as of September 30, 2016). For more information, please visit www.macquarie.com. This release may contain forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements involve inherent risks and uncertainties. We caution you that a number of important factors could cause actual results to differ significantly from these forward-looking statements and we undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements. None of the entities noted in this document is an authorized deposit-taking institution for the purposes of the Banking Act 1959 (Commonwealth of Australia). The obligations of these entities do not represent deposits or other liabilities of Macquarie Bank Limited ABN 46 008 583 542 (MBL). MBL does not guarantee or otherwise provide assurance in respect of the obligations of these entities. THIS RELEASE IS NOT AN OFFER FOR SALE OF SECURITIES IN THE UNITED STATES, AND SECURITIES MAY NOT BE OFFERED OR SOLD IN THE UNITED STATES ABSENT REGISTRATION OR AN EXEMPTION FROM REGISTRATION UNDER THE U.S. SECURITIES ACT OF 1933, AS AMENDED. THIS ANNOUNCEMENT IS NOT FOR RELEASE IN ANY MEMBER STATE OF THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC AREA.


News Article | January 25, 2016
Site: phys.org

This week, for the first time, scientists describe distinct bacterial assemblages living in dental plaque, which they discovered using a novel imaging approach that "cuts through the overwhelming complexity of detail in microbial communities and allows common patterns to shine through." The study appears in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and was led by Jessica Mark Welch of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), Woods Hole, and Gary Borisy of the Forsyth Institute, Cambridge. Plaque on teeth, the team discovered, contains micron-scaled "hedgehog" structures in which eight different kinds of bacteria are radially arranged around ninth kind, filamentous Corynebacteria. Seeing these structures offers scientists valuable information on how the bacterial members function that can't be gleaned from genomic analysis, which specifies what microbes are present in a community, but not how they are organized. "Microbes behave very differently depending on where they are and who they are next to," Mark Welch says. "They will secrete entirely different sets of chemicals and metabolites depending on who their microbial neighbors are. So, if we want to accurately describe what these microbes are doing - really, what they are - we need to know where they are." The team proposes a model for how dental plaque develops, which is based on their imaging observations combined with plaque sequencing data from the Human Microbiome Project. "This is a really exciting new way to look at microbial communities," Mark Welch says of the spectral fluorescence imaging approach they developed at MBL. "The degree of organization we found in the hedgehog structure was amazing, as was the repeated finding of the same structure in different individuals. This finding that bacteria can develop such a degree of spatial organization may be generalizable to other microbiomes. We just have to go look." Explore further: Choosing your neighbors: Scientists see how microbes relate in space More information: Biogeography of a human oral microbiome at the micron scale, www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1522149113


News Article | December 14, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

No statistical methods were used to predetermine sample size. The experiments were not randomized and the investigators were not blinded to allocation during experiments and outcome assessment. Human skin tissue was obtained from healthy donors undergoing corrective breast or abdominal surgery after informed consent in accordance with our institutional guidelines. This study was approved by the Medical Ethics Review Committee of the Academic Medical Center. Split-skin grafts of 0.3 mm in thickness were obtained using a dermatome (Zimmer). After incubation with Dispase II (1 U ml−1, Roche Diagnostics), epidermal sheets were separated from the dermis and cultured in in Iscoves Modified Dulbeccos’s Medium (IMDM, Thermo Fischer Scientific) supplemented with 10% FCS, gentamycine (20 μg ml−1, Centrafarm), pencilline/streptomycin (10 U ml−1 and 10 μg ml−1, respectively; Invitrogen). Further LC purification was performed using a Ficoll gradient (Axis-shield) and CD1a microbeads (Miltenyl Biotec) as described before4, 10. Isolated LCs were routinely 90% pure and expressed high levels of Langerin and CD1a. MUTZ-LCs were differentiated from CD34+ human AML cell line MUTZ3 progenitors in the presence of GM-CSF (100 ng ml−1, Invitrogen), TGF-β (10 ng ml−1, R&D) and TNF-α (2.5 ng ml−1, R&D) and cultured as described before14. Immature DCs were differentiated from monocytes, isolated from buffy coats of healthy volunteer blood donors (Sanquin, The Netherlands), in the presence of IL-4 (500 U ml−1, Invitrogen) and GM-CSF (800 U ml−1, Invitrogen) and used at day 6 or 7 as previously described20. CD4+ T cells were obtained from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) activated with phytohaemagglutinin (1 mg ml−1; L2769, Sigma Aldrich) for 3 days, enriched for CD4+ T cells by negative selection using MACS beads (130-096-533, Miltenyi) and cultured overnight with IL-2 (20 U ml−1; 130-097-745, Miltenyi) as described before5. The following inhibitors were used: rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor, tlrl-rap, Invivogen), bafilomycin A1 (V-ATPase inhibitor; tlrl-baf1; Invivogen) and MG-132 (proteasome inhibitor; 474790; Calbiochem). All cell lines were obtained from ATCC and tested negative for mycoplasma contamination, determined in 3-day-old cell cultures by PCR. Langerin and Langerin mutant W264R expression plasmid pcDNA3.1 were obtained from Life Technologies and subcloned into lentiviral construct pWPXLd (Addgene). HIV-1-based lentiviruses were produced by co-transfection of 293T cells with the lentiviral vector construct, the packaging construct (psPAX2, Addgene) and vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein envelope (pMD2.G, Addgene) as described previously31. U87 cell lines stably expressing CD4 and wild-type CCR5 co-receptor (obtained through the NIH AIDS Reagent Program, Division of AIDS, NIAID, NIH: U87 CD4+CCR5+ cells from H. K. Deng and D. R. Littman32) were transduced with HIV-1-based lentiviruses expressing sequences coding human TRIM5α33, rhesus TRIM5α33, wild-type Langerin or Langerin(W264R). NL4.3, NL4.3-BaL, SF162, NL4.3eGFP-BaL, NL4.3-BlaM-Vpr and VSV-G-pseudotyped NL4.3(ΔEnv) HIV-1 were generated as described10. All produced viruses were quantified by p24 ELISA (Perkin Elmer Life Sciences) and titrated using the indicator cells TZM-Bl. Primary LCs and MUTZ-LCs were infected with a multiplicity of infection of 0.2–0.4 and HIV-1 infection was assessed by flow cytometry at day 7 after infection by intracellular p24 staining. Double staining with CD1a (LCs marker; HI149-APC; BD Pharmigen) and p24 (KC57-RD1-PE; Beckman Coulter) was used to discriminate the percentage of CD1a+p24+ infected LCs. CD4+CCR5+ U87 parental or transduced cells were infected at a multiplicity of infection of 0.1–0.2 and HIV-1 infection was assessed at day 3 after infection by intracellular p24 staining or GFP expression. For analysis of transmission of HIV-1 to T cells, LCs were stringently washed 3 days after infection followed by co-culture with activated allogeneic CD4+ T cells for 3 days. Triple staining with CD1a (LCs marker), CD3 (T cells marker; 552851-PercP, BD Pharmigen) and p24 was used to discriminate the percentage of CD3+CD1a−p24+ infected T cells. HIV-1 infection and transmission was assessed by FACSCanto II flow cytometer (BD Biosciences) and data analysis was carried out with FlowJo software (Treestar). HIV-1 production was determined by a p24 antigen ELISA in culture supernatants (ZeptoMetrix). mRNA was isolated with an mRNA Capture kit (Roche) and cDNA was synthesized with a reverse-transcriptase kit (Promega). For real-time PCR analysis, PCR amplification was performed in the presence of SYBR green in a 7500 Fast Realtime PCR System (ABI). Specific primers were designed with Primer Express 2.0 (Applied Biosystems; Extended Data Table 1). The cycling threshold (C ) value is defined as the number of PCR cycles in which the fluorescence signal exceeds the detection threshold value. For each sample, the normalized amount of target mRNA (N ) was calculated from the C values obtained for both target and household (GAPDH, primary LCs, DCs and U87 cells lines; β-actin, MUTZ-LCs) mRNA with the equation N  = 2Ct(control) − Ct(target). For relative mRNA expression, control siRNA sample was set at 1 within the experiment and for each donor. A two-step Alu-long terminal repeat (LTR) PCR was used to quantify the integrated HIV-1 DNA in infected cells as previously described20. Total cell DNA was isolated at 16 h after infection (multiplicity of infection of 0.4) with a QIAamp blood isolation kit (Qiagen). In the first round of PCR, the DNA sequence between HIV-1 LTR (LTR R region, extended with a marker region at the 5′ end) and the nearest Alu repeat was amplified (primer sequences, Extended Data Table 1). The second round was nested quantitative real-time PCR of the first-round PCR products using primers annealing to the aforementioned marker region in combination with another HIV-1-specific primer (LTR U5 region) by real-time quantitative PCR. Two different dilutions of the PCR products from the first-round of PCR were assayed to ensure that PCR inhibitors were absent. For monitoring the signal contributed by unintegrated HIV-1 DNA, the first-round PCR was also performed using the HIV-1-specific primer (LTR R region) only. HIV-1 integration was normalized relative to GAPDH DNA levels. For relative HIV-1 integration, control siRNA-infected cells (total signal; Supplementary Table 1) was set as 1 for one experiment or for each donor. A BlaM-Vpr-based assay was used to quantify fusion of HIV-1 to the host membrane in infected LCs as previously described10. LCs were infected with NL4.3-BlaM-Vpr for 2 h and then loaded with CCF2/AM (1 mM, LiveBLAzer FRET-B/G Loading Kit, Life technologies) in serum-free IMDM medium for 1 h at 25 °C. After washing, BlaM reaction was allowed to develop for 16 h at 22 °C in IMDM supplemented with 10% FCS and 2.5 mM anion transport inhibitor probenecid (Sigma Pharmaceuticals). HIV-1 fusion was determined by monitoring the changes in fluorescence of CCF2/AM dye, which reflect the presence of BlaM-Vpr into the cytoplasm of target cells upon viral fusion. The shift from green emission fluorescence (500 nm) to blue emission fluorescence (450 nm) of CCF2/AM dye was assessed by flow cytometer LSRFortessa (BD Biosciences) and data analysis was carried out with FlowJo software. Percentages of blue fluorescent CCF2/AM+ cells are depicted as percentage of HIV-1 fusion. A fluorescent bead adhesion assay was used to examine the ability of HIV-1 gp120-coated fluorescent beads to bind Langerin in CD4+CCR5+ U87 transfectants as previously described5. Binding was measured by FACSCanto II flow cytometer and data analysis was carried out with FlowJo software. Skin LCs and DCs were transfected with 50 nm siRNA with the transfection reagent DF4 (Dharmacon) whereas MUTZ-LCs, CD4+CCR5+ U87 parental or transduced cells were transfected with transfection reagent DF1 (Dharmacon) and were used for experiments 48–72 h after transfection. The siRNA (SMARTpool; Dharmacon) were specific for Atg5, (M-004374-04), Atg16L1 (M-021033), LSP-1 (M-012640-00), TRIM5α (M-007100-00) and non-targeting siRNA (D-001206-13) served as control. Langerin was silenced in MUTZ-LCs by electroporation with Neon Transfection System (ThermoFischer Scientific) using siRNA Langerin (10 μM siRNA, M-013059-01, SMARTpool; Dharmacon). Silencing of the aforementioned targets was verified by real-time PCR, flow cytometer and immunoblotting (Extended Data Figs 1d, e, 2a–k). Cells were pre-treated with bafilomycin A1 for 2 h or left untreated followed by incubation with HIV-1 for 16 h. Quantification of intracellular LC3 II levels by saponin extraction was performed as described before34, 35. LCs were washed in PBS and permeabilized with 0.05% saponin in PBS. Cells were incubated at 4 °C for 30 min with mouse anti-LC3 primary antibody (M152-3; MBL International) or with mouse anti-IgG1 isotype control (MOPC-21; BD Pharmingen) followed by incubation with Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated goat-anti mouse IgG antibody (A-21121, Life Technologies) in saponin buffer. Intracellular LC3 II levels were assessed by FACSScan or FACSCanto II flow cytometers (BD Biosciences) and data analysis was carried out with FlowJo. Cells were pre-treated with bafilomycin for 2 h or left untreated followed by incubation with HIV-1 for 4 h. Quantification of intracellular LC3 II levels by saponin extraction was performed as described before35. Whole-cell extracts were prepared using RIPA lysis buffer supplemented with protease inhibitors (9806; Cell Signalling). 20–30 μg of extract were resolved by SDS–PAGE (15%) and immunoblotted with LC3 (2G6; Nanotools) and β-actin (sc-81178; Santa Cruz) antibodies, followed by incubation with HRP-conjugated secondary rabbit-anti-mouse antibody (P0161; Dako) and luminol-based enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL) detection (34075; Thermo Scientific). For gel source data, see Supplementary Fig. 1. MUTZ-LCs (2 × 106) were incubated for 16 h with HIV-1 NL4.3 (multiplicity of infection, 0.5) or left untreated as a control, fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and 1% glutaraldehyde in sodium cacodylate buffer for 10 min at room temperature followed by 24 h at 4 °C. After fixation, cells were collected by centrifugation and the pellet was washed in sodium cacodylate buffer. Cells were post-fixed for 1 h at 4 °C (1% osmium tetroxide, 0.8% potassium ferrocyanide in the same buffer), contrasted in 0.5% uranyl acetate, dehydrated in a graded ethanol series and embedded in epon LX112. Ultrathin sections were stained with uranylacetate/lead citrate and examined with a FEI Tecnai-12 transmission electron microscope. Numbers of autophagosomes per cell was determined in 50 cells for each condition counted by two independent researchers. LCs were left to adhere onto poly-l-lysine coated slides. Cells were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde and permeabilized with PBS/0.1% saponin/1% BSA/1 mM Hepes. Cells were stained with anti-Langerin (AF2088; R&D Systems) and TRIM5α (ab109709; Abcam) antibodies followed by Alexa Fluor 647-conjugated anti-goat (A-21447; Life Technologies) and Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated anti-rabbit (A-21206; Life Technologies). For detection of autophagic vesicles, LCs were pre-loaded with the Cyto-ID Green detection autophagy reagent (ENZ-51031; Enzo Life Sciences), which was previously shown to specifically stain autophagic vesicles36 before adherence to microscope slides and stained with p24 (KC57-RD1-PE; Beckman Coulter) followed by Alexa-Fluor-546-conjugated anti-mouse (A-11003; Life Technologies). Nuclei were counterstained with Hoechst (10 μg ml−1; Molecular Probes). Single plane images were obtained by Leica TCS SP-8 X confocal microscope and data analysis was carried out with Leica LAS AF Lite (Leica Microsystems). Whole-cell extracts were prepared using RIPA lysis buffer supplemented with protease inhibitors. Atg16L1, DC-SIGN, Langerin, p62 and TRIM5α were immunoprecipitated from 40 μg of extract with anti- Atg16L1 (PM040; MBL International), DC-SIGN (AZN-D1)19, Langerin (10E2)5, p62 (ab56416; Abcam), TRIM5α (ab109709; Abcam), mouse IgG1 isotype control (MOPC-21; BD Pharmingen), mouse IgG2a isotype control (IC003A; R&D systems) and rabbit IgG control (sc-2077; Santa Cruz) coated on protein A/G PLUS agarose beads (sc-2003; Santa Cruz), washed twice with ice-cold RIPA lysis buffer and resuspended in Laemmli sample buffer (161-0747, Bio-Rad). Immunoprecipitated samples were resolved by SDS–PAGE (12.5%), and detected by immunoblotting with Atg5 (PM050; MBL), Atg16L1 (MBL), DC-SIGN (551186; BD Biosciences), Langerin (AF2088; R&D Systems), LSP-1 (3812S; Cell Signalling), TRIM5α (Abcam) and HIV-p24 (KC57-RD1-PE; Beckman Coulter) antibodies, followed by incubation with Clean-Blot IP Detection Kit-HRP (21232; Thermo Scientific) and ECL detection (34075; Thermo Scientific). Data acquisition was carried out with ImageQuant LAS 4000 (GE Healthcare). Immunoprecipitation with TRIM5α, Langerin, DC-SIGN, Atg16L1 and p62 pulls-down mostly the TRIM5α (approximately 56 kDa) form. Relative intensity of the bands was quantified using Image Studio Lite 5.2 software by normalizing β-actin and set at 1 in untreated cells. For gel source data, see Supplementary Fig. 1. Two-tailed Student’s t-test for paired observations (differences of stimulations within the same donor or cell-type) or unpaired observation (differences between U87 transfectants). Statistical analyses were performed using GraphPad 6.0 software and significance was set at P < 0.05 (*P < 0.05; **P < 0.01). The data that support the findings of this study are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.


News Article | December 27, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

WOODS HOLE, MASS. -- One of the most profound changes in the life of an organism is what Antonio Giraldez calls "embryonic puberty": the stage when an early embryo stops taking instructions from its mother on how to develop and activates its own genome to kick out those instructions instead. This critical stage, called the maternal-to-zygote transition, happens in all embryos, from sea anemones to humans. Yet how it is regulated in the embryo is not yet known. This week in Nature Methods, Giraldez and colleagues present a novel way to decipher the genetic code that embryos use to instruct many maternal messages (mRNAs) to be destroyed, and others to become stabilized. Giraldez is a Professor of Genetics at Yale University School of Medicine and was a 2016 Research Awardee in the MBL Whitman Center, where he conducted part of this research. The method, called RESA (RNA Element Selection Assay), has broad applications, Giraldez says. "It's a modular method we can use in many contexts, depending on the question the investigator wants to ask, to dissect the meaning of different parts of the genome. It is a molecular 'Rosetta stone' to help us decode the functional elements within the genome." In this case, they used RESA to detect the stability or decay of millions of RNA fragments in the zebrafish embryo, which in turn gave information about the genes that are shut down or activated during the maternal-to-zygote transition. The team developed RESA in zebrafish, Giraldez says, "but the goal is to use it across many different species, so we can find meaningful 'words' or instructions in the genome from squid to mouse to human." He plans to continue testing RESA in squid and other marine model systems at the MBL next year, such as sea urchin and ctenophores. "That's the part I am most excited about, is the MBL offers us this opportunity to test RESA across many species," Giraldez says. "That is priceless; it's work that cannot be done anywhere else in the world." "The MBL made me realize that we know so much about a few species, and so little about so many other species," Giraldez says. "But now, with new sequencing technologies like RESA, we can really understand biology much more broadly across species. That is really a new revolution." The Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) is dedicated to scientific discovery - exploring fundamental biology, understanding marine biodiversity and the environment, and informing the human condition through research and education. Founded in Woods Hole, Massachusetts in 1888, the MBL is a private, nonprofit institution and an affiliate of the University of Chicago.


News Article | April 28, 2016
Site: phys.org

"Cells adopt diverse shapes that are related to how they function. We wondered if cells have the ability to perceive their own shapes, specifically, the curvature of the [cell] membrane," says Drew Bridges, a Ph.D. candidate in the laboratory of Amy Gladfelter, associate professor of biological sciences at Dartmouth College and a scientist in the MBL's Whitman Center. The team focused on the septins, proteins that are usually found near micron-scaled curves in the cell membrane, such as the furrow that marks where the cell will pinch together and divide. Using live-cell imaging at the MBL, they noticed that septins in a novel model system, the fungus Ashbya gossypii, tended to congregate on fungus branches where curvature was highest. They then decided to recreate this natural phenomenon in the lab, using artificial materials they could measure more easily than living cells. Using precisely scaled glass beads coated with lipid membranes, they discovered that septin proteins preferred curves in the 1-3 micron range. They got the same result using human or fungal septins, suggesting that this phenomenon is evolutionarily conserved. "This ability of septins to sense micron-scaled cell curvature provides cells with a previously unknown mechanism for organizing themselves," Bridges says. The idea for the glass bead experiment came from "many rich intellectual discussions with other members of the MBL community," says Bridges, who has accompanied Gladfelter to the MBL each summer since 2012. "Both our collaborations and the imaging resources at MBL were central to this work." More information: Andrew A. Bridges et al, Micron-scale plasma membrane curvature is recognized by the septin cytoskeleton, The Journal of Cell Biology (2016). DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201512029


News Article | October 3, 2016
Site: www.biosciencetechnology.com

Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory and colleagues have unveiled a new microscope that can track the position and orientation of individual molecules in living cells—nanoscale measurements that until now have posed a significant challenge. As reported this week in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences, the team’s “instantaneous fluorescence polarization” microscope offers new insights into how cells achieve directed functions or forces. “All functions of cells are directed. For example, cells move in a specific direction or divide at a certain site and orientation so the two daughter cells are the right size. That direction comes from the nanoscale alignment of molecules in the cells, which this microscope can detect,” said lead author Shalin Mehta, staff scientist in the University of Chicago’s Department of Radiology and a staff researcher at MBL. Understanding how cellular components work requires peering at a nanoscale—to the activity of billionth-of-a-meter-sized molecules that assemble to form the cell’s components and drive their functions. “With this microscope, we can see the orientation of a single molecule, or an assembly of molecules as they form a higher-order structure,” said co-author Tomomi Tani, an MBL associate scientist. The scope can also detect minute conformational changes that are required for the protein’s function. Polarized light microscopes, iterations of which been developed at the MBL since the 1950s, exploit “a property of light not visible to the human eye to measure molecular order below the resolution limit of the microscope,” Mehta explained. The team used the microscope to address various biological questions in collaboration with other scientists at the MBL, including Amy Gladfelter of University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and Clare Waterman of the National Institutes of Health. “That is a unique feature of being at the MBL,” Mehta said. “We were able to study three biological questions while our method was under development. Trying to solve each question led us to improve the microscope and the algorithms with every iteration.”


NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Board of Directors of Macquarie Global Infrastructure Total Return Fund Inc. (NYSE:MGU) (the “Fund”) declared on March 2, 2017, a regular distribution for the quarter ending February 28, 2017 of $0.37 per share. Based on the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) of $25.18 and New York Stock Exchange closing market price of $21.97 on February 24, 2017, the $0.37 per share distribution is equal to an annualized distribution rate of 5.9% at NAV and 6.7% at market price, respectively. A portion of the distributions may be treated as paid from sources other than net income, including, but not limited to, short-term capital gain, long-term capital gain and return of capital. The final determination of the source of all distributions in 2017, including the percentage of qualified dividend income, will be made by the Fund after December 31, 2017. This distribution will be payable on March 31, 2017 to shareholders of record on March 16, 2017, with an ex-dividend date of March 14, 2017. About the Macquarie Global Infrastructure Total Return Fund Inc. Macquarie Global Infrastructure Total Return Fund Inc., a diversified closed-end fund, is listed on the NYSE. The Fund’s investment adviser is Macquarie Capital Investment Management LLC, which is a part of Macquarie Asset Management and a wholly-owned, indirect subsidiary of Macquarie Group Limited. Past performance is no assurance of future results. Investment return and market value of an investment in the Fund will fluctuate. Shares, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original costs. An investor should consider investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses carefully before investing. Forward-looking statements are based on information that is available on the date hereof, and neither the Investment Adviser nor any other person affiliated with the Investment Adviser has any duty to update any forward-looking statements. Important factors that could affect actual results to differ from these statements include, among other factors, material, negative changes to the asset class and the actual composition of the portfolio. Investments in the Fund are not deposits with or other liabilities of Macquarie Bank Limited ABN 46 008 583 542 (“MBL”) nor any Macquarie Group company and are subject to investment risk, including possible delays in repayment and loss of income and principal invested. Neither MBL nor any other member company of the Macquarie Group guarantees the performance of the Fund or the repayment of capital from the Fund or any particular rate of return.


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

Pre-Sub application for The NGAL TestTM to the FDA marks official start of new process After four months of preparation, BioPorto submitted the pre-submission to obtain FDA feedback on the proposed clinical trial protocol and the application for regulatory approval of The NGAL TestTM for clinical use (IVD) in the USA in the beginning of October 2016. BioPorto has been in close dialogue with the FDA to discuss and fully understand the issues with the first application and remains confident that these issues are addressed in the new pre-submission. In this process, BioPorto has involved world-leading specialists and consultants. Given the timeframe of a pre-submission with the FDA and allowing for any changes to the protocol, enrollment of patients is expected to commence in second quarter of 2017. BioPorto maintains the expectation that an approval can be obtained by mid-2018. Workload associated with FDA process in USA leads to temporary slow down in revenue growth for all segments other than The NGAL TestTM The uptake of the NGAL TestTM in South Korea (clinical use) and in USA (research use only) are progressing as planned and by the end of 2016, around 15 RUO users in the USA are expected to have the test running. Following a strong first quarter performance, sales have been stagnant in the other segments compared to 2015, as resources have been allocated to the pre-submission application for The NGAL TestTM. The collaboration with Siemens is progressing according to plan, however, the launch will take place in 2017 due to ongoing shelf life testing. Also, a significant OEM order has been postponed to 2017. As both sales and EBIT has fallen short of expectations, management has initiated a restructuring activity, which has led to a head count reduction in the Danish organization of 20% and will reduce cost by DKK 4 million when fully implemented. NGAL Forms patent upheld and and progress in NGAL Cutoff patent application In the third quarter, The European Patent Office (EPO) confirmed that they had not received an appeal from the opponent regarding BioPorto’s NGAL Forms patent. This means that the patent remains valid. BioPorto has appealed EPO’s decision on the Exclusion patent, which was ruled invalid earlier this year. The NGAL Cutoff patent application has been amended according to the response from the EPO and BioPorto expects an approval to issue the patent within months. Options on future financing being evaluated BioPorto has initiated a process of evaluating options for raising additional capital for financing the company’s increased activities related to the FDA process. The Board's intention is to implement a directed share issue before year-end. Revenue and profit/loss In the third quarter 2016, BioPorto’s revenue totaled DKK 4.6 million against DKK 4.7 million in the third quarter of 2015. Revenue in the first nine months of 2016 was DKK 14.4 million against DKK 14.6 in the same period in 2015, corresponding to a 1% decline. Revenues have not developed as projected except for The NGAL TestTM as management and resources were reallocated to focus on the FDA process. Revenue from the NGAL product portfolio in the first nine months of 2016 was DKK 4.7 million against DKK 4.5 million in 2015. Of this, revenues of The NGAL Test™ amounted to DKK 2.3 million compared to DKK 1.9 million the year before. Sales of MBL kits, antibodies and other products and licenses have declined moderately from DKK 10.1 in the period January to September 2015 to DKK 9.8 in the same period 2016. This brought BioPorto’s operating result before interest and tax (EBIT) to DKK -20.3 million in the first nine months of 2016 compared to DKK -10.6 million in the previous year. Capacity costs in the first nine months of 2016 amount to DKK 30.9 million compared to DKK 21.5 million last year.  Costs are higher predominantly due to the establishment of the US subsidiary, costs related to the FDA resubmission process, and the hiring of a COO and CFO. Furthermore, in the first nine months of 2016, EBIT was also impacted by non-liquidity affecting costs of DKK 1.6 million in expensing of a warrant program to management and key employees.   Guidance for 2016 As a consequence of the turnover and restructuring costs, BioPorto’s expectations for turnover in 2016 is adjusted to DKK 21.5 million corresponding to a growth of 5% (previously DKK 23-25). Correspondingly, expectations for EBIT for the full year 2016 is adjusted to a loss of DKK 23.5 million and profit after tax at DKK -21.5 million (previously a loss of DKK 19-21 and loss after tax of DKK 17-19 respectively). Peter M. Eriksen, CEO comments: "I am very pleased that our new application process for The NGAL TestTM with the FDA is proceeding according to plan with the ground work laid in Q3 2016 resulting in a new Pre-Sub in the beginning of October 2016. We are receiving very strong support for The NGAL TestTM from leading kidney specialists in the USA who recognize the urgent need for the test. We are confident that once FDA approval is achieved, we will experience a rapid uptake of sales in the USA. Having said that, our daily business has been impacted by this workload and we are not performing as planned. Accordingly, we have decided to implement some changes and reorganize, especially within our sales department, to ensure that our costs are in line with our revenues. With our new COO in front, we are working on initiatives that should get sales back on track for next year and continue to trend positively over the future years.” Investor meeting In connection with the release of the interim report, BioPorto hosts an investor meeting on November 3, 2016 at 3 pm. Note that this meeting is held at Danske Bank, Åboulevarden 69, 8000 Aarhus C. Please sign up at investor@bioporto.com. For further information, please contact: Peter Mørch Eriksen, CEO Christina Thomsen, Investor Relations Manager Tel: +45 4529 0000 E-mail: investor@bioporto.com See the full report in the attached pdf


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

Pre-Sub application for The NGAL TestTM to the FDA marks official start of new process After four months of preparation, BioPorto submitted the pre-submission to obtain FDA feedback on the proposed clinical trial protocol and the application for regulatory approval of The NGAL TestTM for clinical use (IVD) in the USA in the beginning of October 2016. BioPorto has been in close dialogue with the FDA to discuss and fully understand the issues with the first application and remains confident that these issues are addressed in the new pre-submission. In this process, BioPorto has involved world-leading specialists and consultants. Given the timeframe of a pre-submission with the FDA and allowing for any changes to the protocol, enrollment of patients is expected to commence in second quarter of 2017. BioPorto maintains the expectation that an approval can be obtained by mid-2018. Workload associated with FDA process in USA leads to temporary slow down in revenue growth for all segments other than The NGAL TestTM The uptake of the NGAL TestTM in South Korea (clinical use) and in USA (research use only) are progressing as planned and by the end of 2016, around 15 RUO users in the USA are expected to have the test running. Following a strong first quarter performance, sales have been stagnant in the other segments compared to 2015, as resources have been allocated to the pre-submission application for The NGAL TestTM. The collaboration with Siemens is progressing according to plan, however, the launch will take place in 2017 due to ongoing shelf life testing. Also, a significant OEM order has been postponed to 2017. As both sales and EBIT has fallen short of expectations, management has initiated a restructuring activity, which has led to a head count reduction in the Danish organization of 20% and will reduce cost by DKK 4 million when fully implemented. NGAL Forms patent upheld and and progress in NGAL Cutoff patent application In the third quarter, The European Patent Office (EPO) confirmed that they had not received an appeal from the opponent regarding BioPorto’s NGAL Forms patent. This means that the patent remains valid. BioPorto has appealed EPO’s decision on the Exclusion patent, which was ruled invalid earlier this year. The NGAL Cutoff patent application has been amended according to the response from the EPO and BioPorto expects an approval to issue the patent within months. Options on future financing being evaluated BioPorto has initiated a process of evaluating options for raising additional capital for financing the company’s increased activities related to the FDA process. The Board's intention is to implement a directed share issue before year-end. Revenue and profit/loss In the third quarter 2016, BioPorto’s revenue totaled DKK 4.6 million against DKK 4.7 million in the third quarter of 2015. Revenue in the first nine months of 2016 was DKK 14.4 million against DKK 14.6 in the same period in 2015, corresponding to a 1% decline. Revenues have not developed as projected except for The NGAL TestTM as management and resources were reallocated to focus on the FDA process. Revenue from the NGAL product portfolio in the first nine months of 2016 was DKK 4.7 million against DKK 4.5 million in 2015. Of this, revenues of The NGAL Test™ amounted to DKK 2.3 million compared to DKK 1.9 million the year before. Sales of MBL kits, antibodies and other products and licenses have declined moderately from DKK 10.1 in the period January to September 2015 to DKK 9.8 in the same period 2016. This brought BioPorto’s operating result before interest and tax (EBIT) to DKK -20.3 million in the first nine months of 2016 compared to DKK -10.6 million in the previous year. Capacity costs in the first nine months of 2016 amount to DKK 30.9 million compared to DKK 21.5 million last year.  Costs are higher predominantly due to the establishment of the US subsidiary, costs related to the FDA resubmission process, and the hiring of a COO and CFO. Furthermore, in the first nine months of 2016, EBIT was also impacted by non-liquidity affecting costs of DKK 1.6 million in expensing of a warrant program to management and key employees.   Guidance for 2016 As a consequence of the turnover and restructuring costs, BioPorto’s expectations for turnover in 2016 is adjusted to DKK 21.5 million corresponding to a growth of 5% (previously DKK 23-25). Correspondingly, expectations for EBIT for the full year 2016 is adjusted to a loss of DKK 23.5 million and profit after tax at DKK -21.5 million (previously a loss of DKK 19-21 and loss after tax of DKK 17-19 respectively). Peter M. Eriksen, CEO comments: "I am very pleased that our new application process for The NGAL TestTM with the FDA is proceeding according to plan with the ground work laid in Q3 2016 resulting in a new Pre-Sub in the beginning of October 2016. We are receiving very strong support for The NGAL TestTM from leading kidney specialists in the USA who recognize the urgent need for the test. We are confident that once FDA approval is achieved, we will experience a rapid uptake of sales in the USA. Having said that, our daily business has been impacted by this workload and we are not performing as planned. Accordingly, we have decided to implement some changes and reorganize, especially within our sales department, to ensure that our costs are in line with our revenues. With our new COO in front, we are working on initiatives that should get sales back on track for next year and continue to trend positively over the future years.” Investor meeting In connection with the release of the interim report, BioPorto hosts an investor meeting on November 3, 2016 at 3 pm. Note that this meeting is held at Danske Bank, Åboulevarden 69, 8000 Aarhus C. Please sign up at investor@bioporto.com. For further information, please contact: Peter Mørch Eriksen, CEO Christina Thomsen, Investor Relations Manager Tel: +45 4529 0000 E-mail: investor@bioporto.com See the full report in the attached pdf


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

Pre-Sub application for The NGAL TestTM to the FDA marks official start of new process After four months of preparation, BioPorto submitted the pre-submission to obtain FDA feedback on the proposed clinical trial protocol and the application for regulatory approval of The NGAL TestTM for clinical use (IVD) in the USA in the beginning of October 2016. BioPorto has been in close dialogue with the FDA to discuss and fully understand the issues with the first application and remains confident that these issues are addressed in the new pre-submission. In this process, BioPorto has involved world-leading specialists and consultants. Given the timeframe of a pre-submission with the FDA and allowing for any changes to the protocol, enrollment of patients is expected to commence in second quarter of 2017. BioPorto maintains the expectation that an approval can be obtained by mid-2018. Workload associated with FDA process in USA leads to temporary slow down in revenue growth for all segments other than The NGAL TestTM The uptake of the NGAL TestTM in South Korea (clinical use) and in USA (research use only) are progressing as planned and by the end of 2016, around 15 RUO users in the USA are expected to have the test running. Following a strong first quarter performance, sales have been stagnant in the other segments compared to 2015, as resources have been allocated to the pre-submission application for The NGAL TestTM. The collaboration with Siemens is progressing according to plan, however, the launch will take place in 2017 due to ongoing shelf life testing. Also, a significant OEM order has been postponed to 2017. As both sales and EBIT has fallen short of expectations, management has initiated a restructuring activity, which has led to a head count reduction in the Danish organization of 20% and will reduce cost by DKK 4 million when fully implemented. NGAL Forms patent upheld and and progress in NGAL Cutoff patent application In the third quarter, The European Patent Office (EPO) confirmed that they had not received an appeal from the opponent regarding BioPorto’s NGAL Forms patent. This means that the patent remains valid. BioPorto has appealed EPO’s decision on the Exclusion patent, which was ruled invalid earlier this year. The NGAL Cutoff patent application has been amended according to the response from the EPO and BioPorto expects an approval to issue the patent within months. Options on future financing being evaluated BioPorto has initiated a process of evaluating options for raising additional capital for financing the company’s increased activities related to the FDA process. The Board's intention is to implement a directed share issue before year-end. Revenue and profit/loss In the third quarter 2016, BioPorto’s revenue totaled DKK 4.6 million against DKK 4.7 million in the third quarter of 2015. Revenue in the first nine months of 2016 was DKK 14.4 million against DKK 14.6 in the same period in 2015, corresponding to a 1% decline. Revenues have not developed as projected except for The NGAL TestTM as management and resources were reallocated to focus on the FDA process. Revenue from the NGAL product portfolio in the first nine months of 2016 was DKK 4.7 million against DKK 4.5 million in 2015. Of this, revenues of The NGAL Test™ amounted to DKK 2.3 million compared to DKK 1.9 million the year before. Sales of MBL kits, antibodies and other products and licenses have declined moderately from DKK 10.1 in the period January to September 2015 to DKK 9.8 in the same period 2016. This brought BioPorto’s operating result before interest and tax (EBIT) to DKK -20.3 million in the first nine months of 2016 compared to DKK -10.6 million in the previous year. Capacity costs in the first nine months of 2016 amount to DKK 30.9 million compared to DKK 21.5 million last year.  Costs are higher predominantly due to the establishment of the US subsidiary, costs related to the FDA resubmission process, and the hiring of a COO and CFO. Furthermore, in the first nine months of 2016, EBIT was also impacted by non-liquidity affecting costs of DKK 1.6 million in expensing of a warrant program to management and key employees.   Guidance for 2016 As a consequence of the turnover and restructuring costs, BioPorto’s expectations for turnover in 2016 is adjusted to DKK 21.5 million corresponding to a growth of 5% (previously DKK 23-25). Correspondingly, expectations for EBIT for the full year 2016 is adjusted to a loss of DKK 23.5 million and profit after tax at DKK -21.5 million (previously a loss of DKK 19-21 and loss after tax of DKK 17-19 respectively). Peter M. Eriksen, CEO comments: "I am very pleased that our new application process for The NGAL TestTM with the FDA is proceeding according to plan with the ground work laid in Q3 2016 resulting in a new Pre-Sub in the beginning of October 2016. We are receiving very strong support for The NGAL TestTM from leading kidney specialists in the USA who recognize the urgent need for the test. We are confident that once FDA approval is achieved, we will experience a rapid uptake of sales in the USA. Having said that, our daily business has been impacted by this workload and we are not performing as planned. Accordingly, we have decided to implement some changes and reorganize, especially within our sales department, to ensure that our costs are in line with our revenues. With our new COO in front, we are working on initiatives that should get sales back on track for next year and continue to trend positively over the future years.” Investor meeting In connection with the release of the interim report, BioPorto hosts an investor meeting on November 3, 2016 at 3 pm. Note that this meeting is held at Danske Bank, Åboulevarden 69, 8000 Aarhus C. Please sign up at investor@bioporto.com. For further information, please contact: Peter Mørch Eriksen, CEO Christina Thomsen, Investor Relations Manager Tel: +45 4529 0000 E-mail: investor@bioporto.com See the full report in the attached pdf

Loading MBL collaborators
Loading MBL collaborators