Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Ludwigshafen am Rhein, Germany

Thiele O.C.,Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery | Brom J.,Brom Epithetik | Dunsche A.,City Hospital Karlsruhe | Ehrenfeld M.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | And 26 more authors.
Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery | Year: 2015

Even though modern surgical techniques are dominating reconstructive facial procedures, the capability to use facial epitheses for reconstruction is still an important skill for the maxillofacial surgeon. We present an international multicenter analysis to clarify which techniques are used to fixate facial prostheses. We contacted all maxillofacial departments in Germany, Austria, Switzerland and Norway which were registered with the German society for oral and maxillofacial surgery (DGMKG). These centers were asked via electronical mail to provide information on the type of epithesis fixation systems currently in use. The return rate from 58 departments was 43.1% (n = 25). Overall, implant fixation was the preferred fixation system (92%). Plates were the second most common fixation technique (32%). No centers reported the standard use of non-invasive fixation techniques for permanent epithesis fixation. The main retention systems in use were magnets (24/25), other retention systems are used much less often. The current preferred fixation technique for facial epitheses consists of implant-based, magnet-fixated epitheses. For nasal prostheses, a plate-based, magnet-fixated system is often used. © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Thiele O.C.,Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery | Kremer T.,Burn Center | Kneser U.,Burn Center | Mischkowski R.A.,Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery
British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery | Year: 2014

The medial femoral condylar flap makes it possible to reconstruct bone, cartilage, and skin, but elongation of the pedicle is usually required to bridge the distances to the vascular connections in the neck. The indications in the maxillofacial area include reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), pseudarthrosis of the jaws, osteonecrosis of the jaws and skull, and augmentation of bone in irradiated or otherwise compromised tissue. If small bony defects require safe and reliable osseous, osteochondral, or osteocutaneous reconstruction, the medial femoral condylar flap can be used to fill the gap between small avascular, and larger microvascular, bone transplants. © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Source


Thiele O.C.,Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery | Mertens C.,University of Heidelberg | Bacon C.,University of Heidelberg | Flechtenmacher C.,University of Heidelberg | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery | Year: 2014

Basal cell carcinoma of the skin is the most common malignancy in the head and neck area. Regional and distant metastases rarely occur with this type of tumour. We report an uncommon case of a sclerodermiform basal cell carcinoma of the facial skin in which metastases developed several years after the primary tumour. The metastases occurred in the soft tissue of the neck, the thyroid gland and the lung. This is the first case of BCC with triple metastases which were histologically confirmed. © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Thiele O.C.,Maxillofacial and Facial Plastic Surgery | Kreppel M.,University of Cologne | Bittermann G.,Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg | Bonitz L.,Witten/Herdecke University | And 56 more authors.
Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery | Year: 2016

Orthognathic surgery has always been a classical focus of maxillofacial surgery. Since more than 100 years, various surgical techniques for mandibular repositioning have been developed and clinically tested. Since the establishment of plate and screw osteosynthesis, orthognathic surgery became more stable and safe. Nowadays, different surgical methods for mobilising the mandible are existing. This international multicenter analysis (n = 51 hospitals) is providing first evidence based data for the current use of different surgical methods. The dominating techniques were Obwegeser/dal Pont (61%) followed by Hunsuck/Epker (37%) and Perthes/Schlössmann (29%). The main osteosynthesis materials were plates (82%), bicortical screws (23.5%), or a combination of both (5.9%). 47% of all centers reported to use several surgical methods at the same time, depending on the anatomical problem and the surgeon's preference. This shows that different surgical methods seem to work as comparable, safe, and reliable procedures in everydays clinical practise. On this basis, further prospective studies could evaluate possible advantages for our patients. © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source

Discover hidden collaborations