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Detmold, Germany

Aladedunye F.,Max Rubner Institute MRI | Przybylski R.,University of Lethbridge
Food Chemistry | Year: 2013

The influence of linoleic acid content and tocopherol isomeric composition on the frying performance of high oleic sunflower oil was evaluated during a 14-day restaurant style frying operation. At equal linoleic acid content, no significant difference was observed between high oleic sunflower oil containing only atocopherol and the sample containing a mixture of α-, γ-, and δ-isomers as measured by the amount of total polar components, oligomers, anisidine value, and free fatty acids. On the contrary, at similar tocopherol isomeric composition, high oleic sunflower oil containing lower amount of linoleic acid showed superior frying stability compared to the sample with a higher content of linoleic acid, suggesting that the frying performance of high oleic sunflower oil is dictated primarily by the level of linoleic acid, with the tocopherol isomeric composition of the oil having no significant influence. In all oil samples, the loss of γ-tocopherol was higher than the corresponding loss of α-tocopherol. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Sosinska E.,Polish Academy of Sciences | Przybylski R.,University of Lethbridge | Aladedunye F.,Max Rubner Institute MRI | Hazendonk P.,University of Lethbridge
Food Chemistry | Year: 2014

Sterol dimers are the main oxidation products formed during sterols degradation at elevated temperatures. An investigation was carried out to decipher the structure of dimers differing in polarity, formed during β-sitosterol thermo-oxidation. The oxidation products were fractionated using silica gel into non-polar (NP), mid-polar (MP) and polar fractions (P). Oligomers were further separated by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). Tentative chemical structures of non-polar, mid-polar and polar dimers were identified using Ag+/CIS-MS and APCI-MS procedures after on-line RP-HPLC separation. Further structures were verified by NMR and FT-IR spectroscopies. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Aladedunye F.A.,Max Rubner Institute MRI
European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology | Year: 2014

Frying is a very complex process and the applied conditions often overwhelm most endogenous and added antioxidants. Synthetic antioxidants such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), and tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) are often added to processed oils to retard oxidative degradation during storage and frying; however, beside their poor performance under frying conditions, consumers' acceptance of synthetic antioxidants remains negative due to their perceived detrimental effect on human health. Consequently, there is a growing interest in the search for effective natural antioxidants for frying applications, notably, from phenolic components of common spices and herbs. The present study provides an overview of the literature on natural antioxidants, sources, and their performance under frying conditions. Practical applications: Sources and performance of natural antioxidants during frying were reviewed. Despite abundance of data on the radical scavenging activity and antioxidant potency of some natural antioxidants under storage conditions, there is still a dearth of information on their activity during frying. This study revealed a number of under-exploited sources of natural antioxidants that could be used to improve the stability of frying oils. Natural antioxidants for frying application. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Source


Aladedunye F.,Max Rubner Institute MRI | Przybylski R.,University of Lethbridge
European Journal of Lipid Science and Technology | Year: 2014

The frying performance of rapeseed, soybean, and sunflower oils with modified fatty acid composition, and palm olein (PALMO) was compared during a rotational frying operation. The frying was conducted at 185±5°C for 6 days where French fries, battered chicken, and fish sticks were fried in succession. At the end of the frying period, high-oleic rapeseed and sunflower oils exhibited a significantly higher frying stability than PALMO and other modified oils, based on total polar components (TPC), polymers, and non-volatile carbonyl compounds formation (anisidine value (AV)). The rate of TPC formation was 2.9, 2.9, 3.2, 3.2, and 3.4% per frying day for high-oleic low-linolenic rapeseed (HOLLRAP), high-oleic sunflower (HOSUN), mid-oleic sunflower (MOSUN), low-linolenic soybean (LLSOY), and PALMO, respectively. Although the contents of free fatty acids (FFA) in the used oils were significantly below the regulatory discard level, in PALMO formation of these compounds was 1.7 times higher compared to the modified oils. Color component formation and tocopherol degradation were also observed to be the highest in palm olein. A 15-member consumer panel awarded HOLLRAP and HOSUN the highest overall sensory acceptance scores, while for LLSOY and PALMO the lowest. Practical applications: Although several frying oils are available in today's market, only a few of them can deliver satisfactory performance during extended frying operation. Thus, the search for the ideal frying oils/fats is an ongoing task. The present study assessed frying performance in the quest for the appropriate frying oils/fats in order to deliver healthy fried products with optimized nutritional qualities. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Source


Aladedunye F.,Max Rubner Institute MRI | Przybylski R.,University of Lethbridge
Food Chemistry | Year: 2014

Recently, we reported the synthesis of a series of dihydrocaffeic acid amides and evaluated their performance as antioxidants for frying applications using a model frying. In the present study, the possibility of a synergy between the amide, N-propyl-N-benzyl-3-(3,4 dihydroxyphenyl)propanamide (DCA) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) was explored in a 6-day actual frying operation. As measured by the amount of polar components (TPC), anisidine value (AnV), changes in fatty acid composition, residual tocopherol and hydroxynonenal (HNE), canola oil containing the formulated antioxidant was twice as stable compared to the regular unfortified oil. At the end of the frying period, the amount of HNE detected in regular canola oil and the fortified sample was at 5.7 and 2.5 μg/g, respectively. Thus, the mixture containing phosphatidylcholine and dihydrocaffeic acid amide is a promising antioxidant for frying application. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source

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