Max Planck Institute for Physics

Munchen, Germany

Max Planck Institute for Physics

Munchen, Germany

The Max Planck Institute for Physics is a physics institute in Munich, Germany that specializes in High Energy Physics and Astroparticle physics. It is part of the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft and is also known as the Werner Heisenberg Institute, after its first director in its current location.The founding of the institute traces back to 1914, as an idea from Fritz Haber, Walther Nernst, Max Planck, Emil Warburg, Heinrich Rubens. On October 1, 1917, the institute was officially founded in Berlin as Kaiser-Wilhelm Institut für Physik with Albert Einstein as the first head director. In October 1922, Max von Laue succeeded Einstein as managing director. Einstein gave up his position as a director of the institute in April 1933. In June 1942, Werner Heisenberg took over as managing director.The Institute took part in the German nuclear weapon project in 1939-1943.A year after the end of fighting in Europe in World War II, the institute was moved to Göttingen and renamed the Max Planck Institute for Physics, with Heisenberg continuing as managing director. In 1946, Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker and Karl Wirtz joined the faculty as the directors for theoretical and experimental physics, respectively.In 1955 the institute made the decision to move to Munich, and soon after began construction of its current building, designed by Sep Ruf. The institute moved into is current location on September 1, 1958 and took on the new name the Max Planck Institute fore Physics and Astrophysics, still with Heisenberg as the managing director. In 1991, the institute was split into the Max Planck Institute for Physics, the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. Wikipedia.

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Zhou S.,Max Planck Institute for Physics
Physics Letters, Section B: Nuclear, Elementary Particle and High-Energy Physics | Year: 2011

We apply the permutation symmetry S3 to both charged-lepton and neutrino mass matrices, and suggest a useful symmetry-breaking scheme, in which the flavor symmetry is explicitly broken down via S3→Z3→Ø in the charged-lepton sector and via S3→Z2→Ø in the neutrino sector. Such a two-stage breaking scenario is reasonable in the sense that both Z3 and Z2 are the subgroups of S3, while Z3 and Z2 only have a trivial subgroup. In this scenario, we can obtain a relatively large value of the smallest neutrino mixing angle, e.g., θ13≈9°, which is compatible with the recent result from T2K experiment and will be precisely measured in the ongoing Double Chooz and Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiments. Moreover, the maximal atmospheric mixing angle θ23≈45° can also be obtained while the best-fit value of solar mixing angle θ12≈34° is assumed, which cannot be achieved in previous S3 symmetry models. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Calcagni G.,Max Planck Institute for Physics
Physics Letters, Section B: Nuclear, Elementary Particle and High-Energy Physics | Year: 2011

Despite their diversity, many of the most prominent candidate theories of quantum gravity share the property to be effectively lower-dimensional at small scales. In particular, dimension two plays a fundamental role in the finiteness of these models of Nature. Thus motivated, we entertain the idea that spacetime is a multifractal with integer dimension 4 at large scales, while it is two-dimensional in the ultraviolet. Consequences for particle physics, gravity and cosmology are discussed. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.


Pranzetti D.,Max Planck Institute for Physics
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2014

By reintroducing Lorentz invariance in canonical loop quantum gravity, we define a geometrical notion of temperature for quantum isolated horizons. This is done by demanding that the horizon state satisfying the boundary conditions be a Kubo-Martin-Schwinger state. The exact formula for the temperature can be derived by imposing the reality conditions in the form of the linear simplicity constraints for an imaginary Barbero-Immirzi parameter. Thus, our analysis reveals the connection between the analytic continuation to the Ashtekar self-dual variables and the thermality of the horizon. The horizon thermal equilibrium state can then be used to compute both the entanglement and the Boltzmann entropies. We show that the two provide the same finite answer, which allows us to recover the Bekenstein-Hawking formula in the semiclassical limit. In this way, we shed new light on the microscopic origin of black hole entropy by revealing the equivalence between the near-horizon degrees of freedom entanglement proposal and the state-counting interpretation. The connection with the Connes-Rovelli thermal time proposal for a general relativistic statistical mechanics is worked out. © 2014 American Physical Society.


Stieberger S.,Max Planck Institute for Physics
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2011

We consider the scattering amplitudes of five and six gravitons at tree level in superstring theory. Their power series expansions in the Regge slope α′ are analyzed through the order α ′8 showing some interesting constraints on higher order gravitational couplings in the effective superstring action such as the absence of R5 terms. Furthermore, some transcendentality constraints on the coefficients of the nonvanishing couplings are observed: the absence of zeta values of even weight through the order α′8 like the absence of ζ(2)ζ(3)R6 terms. Our analysis is valid for any superstring background in any space-time dimension, which allows for a conformal field theory description. © 2011 American Physical Society.


Grimm T.W.,Max Planck Institute for Physics
Physics Letters, Section B: Nuclear, Elementary Particle and High-Energy Physics | Year: 2014

We study the dynamics of axion-like fields in F-theory and suggest that they can serve as inflatons in models of natural inflation. The axions arise from harmonic three-forms on the F-theory compactification space and parameterize a complex torus that varies over the geometric moduli space. In particular, this implies that the axion decay constants depend on the complex structure moduli that can be fixed by background fluxes. This might allow tuning them to be super-Planckian in a controlled way and allow for interesting single field inflationary models. We argue that this requires a localization of the three-forms near regions of strong string coupling, analogously to the reasoning that GUT physics requires the use of F-theory. These models can admit a tensor to scalar ratio r>. 0.1. © 2014 The Author.


Calcagni G.,Max Planck Institute for Physics
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2010

We propose a field theory which lives in fractal spacetime and is argued to be Lorentz invariant, power-counting renormalizable, ultraviolet finite, and causal. The system flows from an ultraviolet fixed point, where spacetime has Hausdorff dimension 2, to an infrared limit coinciding with a standard four-dimensional field theory. Classically, the fractal world where fields live exchanges energy momentum with the bulk with integer topological dimension. However, the total energy momentum is conserved. We consider the dynamics and the propagator of a scalar field. Implications for quantum gravity, cosmology, and the cosmological constant are discussed. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Raffelt G.,Max Planck Institute for Physics
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2012

Axions or similar hypothetical pseudoscalar bosons may have a small CP-violating scalar Yukawa interaction gsN with nucleons, causing macroscopic monopole-dipole forces. Torsion-balance experiments constrain gpegsN, whereas gpNgsN is constrained by the depolarization rate of ultra-cold neutrons or spin-polarized nuclei. However, the pseudoscalar couplings gpe and gpN are strongly constrained by stellar energy-loss arguments and gsN by searches for anomalous monopole-monopole forces, together providing the most restrictive limits on gpegsN and gpNgsN. The laboratory limits on gsN are currently the most restrictive constraints on CP-violating axion interactions. © 2012 American Physical Society.


Pranzetti D.,Max Planck Institute for Physics
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2012

We provide a statistical mechanical analysis of quantum horizons near equilibrium in the grand canonical ensemble. By matching the description of the nonequilibrium phase in terms of weakly dynamical horizons with a local statistical framework, we implement loop quantum gravity dynamics near the boundary. The resulting radiation process provides a quantum gravity description of the horizon evaporation. For large black holes, the spectrum we derive presents a discrete structure which could be potentially observable. © 2012 American Physical Society.


Lin S.,Max Planck Institute for Physics
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2012

Starting from a low energy effective chiral Lagrangian with a gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten term, we have derived a hydrodynamic theory for chiral superfluid. It is a non-Abelian hydrodynamics at zero temperature with only superfluid components. With an external electromagnetic field and baryonic and axial baryonic chemical potentials turned on, we are able to identify analogs of various anomaly induced terms in normal hydrodynamics, including a chiral vortical effect, a chiral magnetic effect, and a chiral electric effect. As an example, we solved the hydrodynamic equations for the ground state and observed the chiral magnetic effect and chiral separation in the confined phase. © 2012 American Physical Society.


Lehners J.-L.,Max Planck Institute for Physics
Physical Review D - Particles, Fields, Gravitation and Cosmology | Year: 2012

Eternal inflation produces pocket universes with all physically allowed vacua and histories. Some of these pocket universes might contain a phase of slow-roll inflation, some might undergo cycles of cosmological evolution, and some might look like the Galilean genesis or other "emergent" universe scenarios. Which one of these types of universe we are most likely to inhabit depends on the measure we choose in order to regulate the infinities inherent in eternal inflation. We show that the current leading measure proposals-namely, the global light-cone cutoff and its local counterpart, the causal diamond measure-as well as closely related proposals, all predict that we should live in a pocket universe that starts out with a small Hubble rate, thus favoring emergent and cyclic models. Pocket universes which undergo cycles are further preferred, because they produce habitable conditions repeatedly inside each pocket. © 2012 American Physical Society.

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