Max Planck Institute For Molekulare Pfanzenphysiologie

Schönau am Königssee, Germany

Max Planck Institute For Molekulare Pfanzenphysiologie

Schönau am Königssee, Germany

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Glaubitz U.,Max Planck Institute For Molekulare Pfanzenphysiologie | Erban A.,Max Planck Institute For Molekulare Pfanzenphysiologie | Kopka J.,Max Planck Institute For Molekulare Pfanzenphysiologie | Hincha D.K.,Max Planck Institute For Molekulare Pfanzenphysiologie | Zuther E.,Max Planck Institute For Molekulare Pfanzenphysiologie
Journal of Experimental Botany | Year: 2015

Global climate change combined with asymmetric warming can have detrimental effects on the yield of crop plants such as rice (Oryza sativa L.). Little is known about metabolic responses of rice to high night temperature (HNT) conditions. Twelve cultivars with different HNT sensitivity were used to investigate metabolic changes in the vegetative stage under HNT compared to control conditions. Central metabolism, especially TCA cycle and amino acid biosynthesis, were strongly affected particularly in sensitive cultivars. Levels of several metabolites were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Furthermore, pool sizes of some metabolites negatively correlated with HNT sensitivity under control conditions, indicating metabolic pre-adaptation in tolerant cultivars. The polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine showed increased abundance in sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions. Correlations between the content of polyamines and 75 other metabolites indicated metabolic shifts from correlations with sugar-phosphates and 1-kestose under control to correlations with sugars and amino and organic acids under HNT conditions. Increased expression levels of ADC2 and ODC1, genes encoding enzymes catalysing the frst committed steps of putrescine biosynthesis, were restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT. Additionally, transcript levels of eight polyamine biosynthesis genes were correlated with HNT sensitivity. Responses to HNT in the vegetative stage result in distinct differences between differently responding cultivars with a dysregulation of central metabolism and an increase of polyamine biosynthesis restricted to sensitive cultivars under HNT conditions and a pre-adaptation of tolerant culti-vars already under control conditions with higher levels of potentially protective compatible solutes. © 2015 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

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