Max Planck Halbleiterlabor

München, Germany

Max Planck Halbleiterlabor

München, Germany

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Osipov T.,Western Michigan University | Rolles D.,Max Planck Advanced Study Group | Bostedt C.,SLAC | Castagna J.-C.,SLAC | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Physics: Conference Series | Year: 2012

We are designing and building the next generation multi-purpose instrumentation especially adapted to accommodate unique large-area, single-photon counting pnCCD detectors together with advanced many-particle ion and electron imaging spectrometers (reaction microscope, REMI; velocity map imaging, VMI; magnetic bottle) for simultaneous detection of scattered and fluorescent photons and charged particles in experiments at the LCLS FEL.


Anielski D.,Max Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL | Anielski D.,Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics | Anielski D.,PNSensor GmbH | Boll R.,Max Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL | And 116 more authors.
International Conference on Ultrafast Structural Dynamics, ICUSD 2012 | Year: 2012

We present static and time-resolved photoelectron angular distributions of laser-aligned p-fluorophenylacetylene and OCS molecules photoionized by fs-FEL pulses. The results are a proof-of-principle for recording dynamic structural changes of a molecule during Coulomb explosion. © 2012 OSA.


Hauf S.,TU Darmstadt | Kuster M.,TU Darmstadt | Kuster M.,German Electron Synchrotron | Hoffmann D.H.H.,TU Darmstadt | And 6 more authors.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2012

The ATHENA X-ray observatory was a European Space Agency project for a L-class mission. ATHENA was to be based upon a simplified IXO design with the number of instruments and the focal length of the Wolter optics being reduced. One of the two instruments, the Wide Field Imager (WFI) was to be a DePFET based focal plane pixel detector, allowing for high time and spatial resolution spectroscopy in the energy-range between 0.1 and 15 keV. In order to fulfill the mission goals a high sensitivity is essential, especially to study faint and extended sources. Thus a detailed understanding of the detector background induced by cosmic ray particles is crucial. During the mission design generally extensive Monte-Carlo simulations are used to estimate the detector background in order to optimize shielding components and software rejection algorithms. The Geant4 toolkit1,2 is frequently the tool of choice for this purpose. Alongside validation of the simulation environment with XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and Space Shuttle STS-53 data we present estimates for the ATHENA WFI cosmic ray induced background including long-Term activation, which demonstrate that DEPFET-Technology based detectors are able to achieve the required sensitivity. © 2012 SPIE.


Majewski P.,PNSensor GmbH | Andricek L.,Max Planck Halbleiterlabor | Andricek L.,Max Planck Institute for Physics | Lauf T.,Max Planck Halbleiterlabor | And 20 more authors.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2010

We report on the first results from a new setup for electrical qualification measurements of DEPFET pixel detector matrices. In order to measure the transistor properties of all pixels, the DEPFET device is placed into a benchtest setup and electrically contacted via a probecard. Using a switch matrix, each pixel of the detector array can be addressed individually for characterization. These measurements facilitate to pre-select the best DEPFET matrices as detector device prior to the mounting of the matrix and allow to investigate topics like the homogeneity of transistor parameters on device, wafer and batch level in order to learn about the stability and reproducibility of the production process. Especially with regard to the detector development for the IXO Wide Field Imager (WFI), this yield learning will be an important tool. The first electrical qualification measurements with this setup were done on DEPFET macropixel detector flight hardware, which will form the FPAs of the Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (MIXS) on board of the 5th ESA cornerstone mission BepiColombo. The DEPFET array consists of 64×64 macropixel for which the transfer, output and clear characteristics were measured. © 2010 SPIE.


Majewski P.,PNSensor GmbH | Aschauer F.,Max Planck Halbleiterlabor | Aschauer F.,Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics | Aschauer S.,PNSensor GmbH | And 17 more authors.
Experimental Astronomy | Year: 2014

The Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (MIXS) will be launched on board of the 5th ESA cornerstone mission BepiColombo. The two channel instrument MIXS is dedicated to the exploration of the elemental composition of the mercurian surface by imaging x-ray spectroscopy of the elemental fluorescence lines. One of the main scientific goals of MIXS is to provide spatially resolved elemental abundance maps of key rock-forming elements. MIXS will be the successor of the XRS instrument, which is currently orbiting Mercury on board of NASAs satellite MESSENGER. MIXS will provide unprecedented spectral and spatial resolution due to its innovative detector and optics concepts. The MIXS target energy band ranges from 0.5 to 7 keV and allows to directly access the Fe-L line at 0.7 keV, which was not accessible to previous missions. In addition, the high spectroscopic resolution of FWHM ≤ 200 eV at the reference energy of 1 keV after one year in Mercury orbit, allows to separate the x-ray fluorescence emission lines of important elements like Mg (1.25 keV) and Al (1.49 keV) without the need for any filter. The detectors for the energy and spatially resolved detection of x-rays for both channels are identical DEPFET (DEpleted P-channel FET) active pixel detectors. We report on the calibration of the MIXS flight and flight spare detector modules at the PTB (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt) beamlines at the BESSY II synchrotron radiation facility. Each detector was calibrated at least at 10 discrete energies in the energy range from 0.5 to 10 keV. The excellent spectroscopic performance of all three detector modules was verified. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.


Majewski P.,PNSensor GmbH | Aschauer F.,Max Planck Halbleiterlabor | Aschauer F.,Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics | Bahr A.,Max Planck Halbleiterlabor | And 31 more authors.
Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering | Year: 2012

The Mercury Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (MIXS) is an instrument on board of the 5th ESA cornerstone mission BepiColombo. This Spectrometer comprises two instruments for imaging x-ray spectroscopy of the Mercury surface. The detector plane arrays (DPA) for the energy and spatial resolved detection of x-rays are based on DEPFET (Depleted P-channel FET) macropixel detectors with 64 × 64 pixel each and 300 × 300 μm2 pixel size. The MIXS target energy band is from 0.5 to 7 keV with an energy resolution better than 200 eV at 1 keV at mission end. This allows to access the Fe-L line at about 0.7 keV, which was not accessible to previous instruments, and to separate the x-ray lines of the elements of interest. Before a detector chip is integrated into a detector module, it is electrically pre-characterized in order to select only the best chips for the complex and time-consuming integration. The high degree of complexity of the integration process comes from the need to thermally decouple the detector chip from its readout and steering ASICs by a sophisticated mechanical structure, due to the limited amount of cooling power available for the instrument. After the spectroscopic characterization of the detector modules, the flight and flight spare detectors were calibrated at the PTB (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt) beamlines at the BESSY-II synchrotron. We report on the pre-characterization, integration, qualification and calibration of MIXS flight and flight spare detectors, which is now successfully completed. © 2012 SPIE.

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