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Ebene, Mauritius

Madhou M.,Mauritius Research Council | Normand F.,CIRAD | Bahorun T.,University of Mauritius | Hormaza J.I.,Institute Hortofruticultura Subtropical y Mediterranea IHSM UMA CSIC
Tree Genetics and Genomes | Year: 2013

Litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) is a fruit crop with a clear niche for expansion in countries with subtropical climates. One of the main limitations for breeding purposes and optimum germplasm management in this species is the confusion in cultivar denomination among different producing countries and germplasm collections worldwide. Litchi cultivar identification is still mainly based on morphological characters, and homonymies and synonymies are very frequent. To address this gap, a molecular study was conducted to characterize litchi accessions from two of the main litchi-producing regions for the export market, Mauritius and Réunion, and to compare them to those obtained from litchi cultivars from different origins conserved in a germplasm collection in Spain. Eleven simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were used to characterize molecular polymorphisms among 88 litchi accessions conserved in Mauritius, Réunion, and Spain. A total of 67 amplification fragments were detected with those 11 SSRs, with an average of 6. 1 bands/SSR. Three primer pairs seemed to amplify more than one locus. The mean expected and observed heterozygosities over the eight single locus SSRs averaged 0. 53 and 0. 61, respectively. The total value for the probability of identity was 9. 78 × 10-4. Molecular characterization revealed the existence of 42 different genetic profiles. Several synonymies and homonymies in litchi cultivar nomenclature both within and across geographical regions were found. This comparative study provides the basis for the standardization of litchi cultivar nomenclature over the studied regions and in other litchi-producing countries. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


Madhou M.,Mauritius Research Council | Normand F.,CIRAD | Bahorun T.,University of Mauritius | Hormaza J.I.,Institute Hortofruticultura Subtropical y Mediterranea La Mayora IHSM UMA CSIC
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2014

One of the main limitations for breeding purposes and optimum germplasm management in litchi is the confusion in cultivar denomination among different litchi-producing countries and germplasm collections worldwide that results in a high number of homonymies and synonymies. In this work, we have characterized 88 litchi accessions conserved in three different germplasm collections (Mauritius, Réunion and Spain) using microsatellite markers. A total of 11 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were used that yielded 67 amplification fragments, with an average of 6.1 amplification bands/SSR. Eight primer pairs amplified single loci in the accessions examined. The mean expected and observed heterozygosities over those 8 single locus SSRs averaged 0.53 and 0.61, respectively, with a value for the probability of identity of 9.78×10-4. A total of 42 different genetic profiles were found among the 88 samples analyzed and several synonymies and homonymies both within and among the germplasm collections were found. No clear geographical trends could be observed among the groups obtained in the UPGMA dendrogram. The results demonstrate the usefulness of these kinds of molecular markers for the optimization of litchi germplasm management and they will be discussed in terms of their implications for the standardization of litchi cultivar nomenclature over the studied germplasm collections and in other litchi-producing countries in order to have a clear picture of current litchi germplasm conservation worldwide.


Msuya F.E.,University of Dar es Salaam | Buriyo A.,University of Dar es Salaam | Omar I.,Instituto Nacional Of Desenvolvimento Da Aquacultura | Pascal B.,British Petroleum | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Applied Phycology | Year: 2014

Seaweed farming in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO) Region is carried out in a number of countries, most of them farming Eucheuma denticulatum, Kappaphycus alvarezii and Kappaphycus striatum. These species are farmed mostly in Tanzania with limited production in Madagascar, Mozambique and Kenya; current production (2012) stands at 15,966 t (dry weight) year−1 of Eucheuma and Kappaphycus, valued at US$ 4.2 million with 95 % of this tonnage coming from Tanzania. Other countries in the region have limited or no seaweed production owing to problems of epiphytes, ice ice and markets. The problem of epiphytes coupled with ice ice that WIO countries are facing causes die-off of Kappaphycus which is the preferred species in foreign markets for its thicker gel, kappa carrageenan (vs. the weaker iota carrageenan from Eucheuma). New efforts are put to curb these problems including moving seaweed farms to deeper waters and cultivation trials of other carrageenophytes as well as agar-producing species, agarophytes. Research work has been initiated to evaluate Gracilaria and Hypnea farming and processing in Tanzania, the Republic of Mauritius and Mayotte. Gracilaria farming is at experimental stages as a biofilter of fishpond effluents and as potential species for the production of agar with growth rates of 1.5–1.9 % day−1. Hypnea farming is only being initiated in Mauritius and Mayotte at present. Other innovations including value addition by making various seaweed products and encouraging the consumption of seaweed as food at least in Tanzania and Mauritius are increasing further the importance of the seaweed farming and processing industry in the WIO Region. © 2013, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

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