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Aggarwal N.,Maulana Azad Medical College And Associated Ln
Education for health (Abingdon, England) | Year: 2013

Low back pain (LBP) is the most common orthopedic problem worldwide and is known to affect both younger and older adults. The stressful and time consuming curriculum of medical students predisposes them to this problem. Few statistics are available on prevalence rates of LBP among medical students in India. This study assesses the prevalence and risk factors of LBP in students of a medical college in Delhi. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a medical college in Delhi. The study subjects (n = 160; 100% participation) were selected via stratified random sampling from all undergraduate medical students (aged 17-25 years). A validated questionnaire was used to collect the data. The overall prevalence of LBP among the students over the past one year was 47.5% (n = 76) with a prevalence of 32.5% at the time of data collection. Prevalence among males and females was 45.3% and 50%, respectively. Significant associations were found between LBP in the past year and coffee drinking (Regular = 57%, Occasional = 38.9%, Never = 65.2%, χ2 = 7.24, P= 0.02), body posture (Normal = 32.6%, Abnormal = 75%, χ2 = 18.97, P < 0.001), place of study (Study table = 33.8%, Bed = 58.6, Both = 61.5% χ2 = 10.51, P = 0.01), family history of LBP (Present = 75%, Absent = 38.3%, χ2 = 16.17, P < 0.001) and carrying backpacks (Regular = 50%, Occasional = 33%, Never = 0%, χ2 = 16.17, P < 0.001). The mean scores of depression (2.7 vs. 1.6), anxiety (3.5 vs 1.9), and monotonous work (3.9 vs. 1.8) were found to be significantly higher in group with LBP than in the non-LBP group. However, no association with LBP was seen for weight lifting, watching television/working on computers, driving, wearing heels, or body mass index. The high prevalence of LBP among medical students and its association with poor study habits, lifestyle habits, and psychological factors highlight a need for life skills training, education, counseling, and restructuring of the medical curriculum. Source


Anand T.,Maulana Azad Medical College And Associated Ln | Rahi M.,Indian Council of Medical Research | Sharma P.,Maulana Azad Medical College And Associated Ln | Ingle G.K.,Maulana Azad Medical College And Associated Ln
Nutrition | Year: 2014

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be major public health problem in India. It is estimated that about 20% of maternal deaths are directly related to anemia and another 50% of maternal deaths are associated with it. The question, therefore, is why, despite being the first country to launch the National Nutritional Anemia Prophylaxis Programme in 1970, the problem of IDA remains so widespread. As is to be expected, the economic implications of IDA are also massive. The issues of control of IDA in India are multiple. Inadequate dietary intake of iron, defective iron absorption, increased iron requirements due to repeated pregnancies and lactation, poor iron reserves at birth, timing of umbilical cord clamping, timing and type of complementary food introduction, frequency of infections in children, and excessive physiological blood loss during adolescence and pregnancy are some of the causes responsible for the high prevalence of anemia in India. In addition, there are other multiple programmatic and organizational issues. This review, therefore, is an attempt to examine the current burden of anemia in India, its epidemiology, and the various issues regarding its prevention and control, as well as to offer some innovative approaches to deal with this major health problem. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. Source


Basandra S.,Maulana Azad Medical College And Associated Ln | Divyansh,Maulana Azad Medical College And Associated Ln
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2014

Background: Dyspepsia and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) are perhaps one of the most common gastrointestinal diseases universally. The prevalence of dyspepsia ranges from 7-40% while the prevalence of IBS ranges between3-22% in population based studies worldwide.Aims: This study was conducted to estimate the prevalence, socio-demographic and lifestyle associated risk factors of Dyspepsia and IBS among medical college students of urban Delhi, Northern India.Settings and Design: It is a cross-sectional study and was carried out from January to March 2014 at Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi, India.Materials and Methods: A total of 210 students from a Medical College were asked to complete a semi-structured questionnaire based on identification and socio-demographic data, questions pertaining to lifestyle and Rome III criteria.Results: Of the valid 200 subjects, 90(45%) were males and 110(55%) were females, with a mean age of 20.43± 1.05 y. Majority of the subjects (diagnosed with uninvestigated dyspepsia and IBS) were in the age group of 18-20 y with female gender having higher odds for both. The prevalence of dyspepsia was 18% while that of IBS was 16.5%.Consumption of fatty food, cigarettes and low physical activity were observed as most significant correlates.Conclusion: Rome III criteria enables symptom based diagnosis of dyspepsia and IBS.The prevalence of dyspepsia and IBS in college students from Delhi is observed to be higher. Association with lifestyle related factors highlights the importance of modifications in their prevention. © 2014, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. All rights reserved. Source


Aggarwal N.,Maulana Azad Medical College And Associated Ln | Anand T.,Maulana Azad Medical College And Associated Ln | Kishore J.,Maulana Azad Medical College And Associated Ln | Ingle G.K.,Maulana Azad Medical College And Associated Ln
Education for Health: Change in Learning and Practice | Year: 2013

Context: Low back pain (LBP) is the most common orthopedic problem worldwide and is known to affect both younger and older adults. The stressful and time consuming curriculum of medical students predisposes them to this problem. Few statistics are available on prevalence rates of LBP among medical students in India. This study assesses the prevalence and risk factors of LBP in students of a medical college in Delhi. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in a medical college in Delhi. The study subjects (n = 160; 100% participation) were selected via stratified random sampling from all undergraduate medical students (aged 17-25 years). A validated questionnaire was used to collect the data. Results: Th e overall prevalence of LBP among the students over the past one year was 47.5% (n = 76) with a prevalence of 32.5% at the time of data collection. Prevalence among males and females was 45.3% and 50%, respectively. Significant associations were found between LBP in the past year and coffee drinking (Regular = 57%, Occasional = 38.9%, Never = 65.2%, χ2 = 7.24, P = 0.02), body posture (Normal = 32.6%, Abnormal = 75%, χ2 = 18.97, P < 0.001), place of study (Study table = 33.8%, Bed = 58.6, Both = 61.5% χ2 = 10.51, P = 0.01), family history of LBP (Present = 75%, Absent = 38.3%, χ2 = 16.17, P < 0.001) and carrying backpacks (Regular = 50%, Occasional = 33%, Never = 0%, χ2 = 16.17, P < 0.001). The mean scores of depression (2.7 vs. 1.6), anxiety (3.5 vs 1.9), and monotonous work (3.9 vs. 1.8) were found to be significantly higher in group with LBP than in the non-LBP group. However, no association with LBP was seen for weight lifting, watching television/working on computers, driving, wearing heels, or body mass index. Discussion: The high prevalence of LBP among medical students and its association with poor study habits, lifestyle habits, and psychological factors highlight a need for life skills training, education, counseling, and restructuring of the medical curriculum. Source


Anand T.,Maulana Azad Medical College And Associated Ln | Ingle G.K.,Maulana Azad Medical College And Associated Ln | Meena G.S.,Maulana Azad Medical College And Associated Ln | Kishore J.,Maulana Azad Medical College And Associated Ln | Kumar R.,Maulana Azad Medical College And Associated Ln
International Journal of Preventive Medicine | Year: 2014

Background: Hypertension is fast emerging as a major health problem amongst all school adolescents, particularly in urban areas. Regular screening of the students for this is required for preventing the emergence of complications later in life. Therefore, the present study was undertaken with the objective to determine the prevalence of hypertension amongst urban school adolescents and its correlation with anthropometric measurements. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a school in Central Delhi involving all 315 students of 9th and 11th standard. A preforma was filled by the students and anthropometric measurements along with blood pressure (BP) measurements were taken for each student. Data was analyzed using Epi-info 2005 and SPSS 16.0. Results: Out of the total 315 students, 208 (66%) were boys and 107 (34%) were girls and the mean age was 14.31 ± 0.96 years. Overall prevalence of malnutrition was 24% and boys were found to be more obese as compared to girls. There were 5 students (1.6%) who were found to have systolic hypertension while 17 (5.4%) were found to have diastolic hypertension while 4.1% (n = 13) of the participants were systolic pre-hypertensive and 26% (n = 82) were in stage of diastolic pre-hypertension. Body mass index and gender were found to be independent predictor for systolic hypertension. Conclusions: Prevalence of hypertension and pre-hypertension was high amongst the school children. BP check-up for children and adolescents is thus recommended to take remedial action on time. Source

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