Matshya Bhaban

Dhaka, Bangladesh

Matshya Bhaban

Dhaka, Bangladesh
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Hossain M.B.,Matshya Bhaban | Ahmed S.,Matshya Bhaban | Rahman M.F.,Matshya Bhaban | Kamaruzzaman B.Y.,International Islamic University Malaysia | Jalal K.C.A.,International Islamic University Malaysia
Journal of Biological Sciences | Year: 2013

Liquid Chromatographic Mass Spectrometric System (LCMSMS) method was developed and validated in shrimp matrix for determination of nitrofuran metabolites in the laboratory of fish inspection and quality control, Department of Fisheries, Matshya Bhaban, Dhaka, Bangladesh. This confirmatory method was used for testing samples for residues of the metabolites of the following nitrofuran compounds, furazolidone (3-amino-2-oxazolidinone, AOZ); furaltadone (5-methyl-morpholino-3-amino-2-oxazolidinone, AMOZ); nitrofurazone (semicarbazide, SEM) and nitrofurantoin (1-aminohydantoin, AFJD) in shrimp. The data were generated (3 levels and seven replicates per level) on each of three days for shrimp. The mean recoveries from the tissues were 88-110%, the decision limits (CCα) were 0.12-0.23 ppb and the detection capabilities (CCα) 0.21-0.38 ppb. CCα and CCβ were calculated using the procedure set out in ISO Guide 11843. Nevertheless, CCα value for all nitrofuran metabolites can be investigated and meet the specified easily met the specified EU MRPL of 1 ug kg-1 ranged from 0.12-0.23 ug kg-1 and suitable for routine quality control operations.


Rahman M.F.,Matshya Bhaban | Jalal K.C.A.,International Islamic University Malaysia | Jahan N.,Matshya Bhaban | Kamaruzzaman B.Y.,International Islamic University Malaysia
Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences | Year: 2012

Coordination among the different stakeholders at policy planning, implementation and target beneficiary level, particularly among the agencies responsible for development and management of water resources, agriculture and fisheries, is essential for overall sustainable development. Stocking of larger fingerlings at suitable stocking densities of endemic (rohu, catla, mrigal) and exotic (silver carp, bighead carp, common carp/mirror carp) species should be stocked at varying proportion. Floodplain fish production depends only on the natural fertility of the water bodies. Technological interventions should include the installation of low cost bamboo fencing at water inlet and outlet points and setting of ring culverts for maintaining suitable levels of water for fish culture without hampering the production of rice and other crops in the intervention areas, selective stocking with native and exotic carps, restricted fishing for certain period of time and guarding. It is expected to exert positive influences in enhancing the standing crop and biodiversity of non-stocked species of fishes in the intervention seasonal floodplain. Entry of fish larvae, hatchlings and young fry of wild non-stocked fishes into the seasonal floodplains because of large fence spacing (approximately 1.0 cm), could restrict fishing for certain period, undisturbed habitat and guarding could contribute to higher productivity and enhancement of fish biodiversity in the seasonal floodplains. Proper motivation and effective cooperation of the beneficiaries are extremely important to culture fish in the seasonal floodplains under community based management system. Institutional support and constant vigilance from the Department of Fisheries (DoF) and local administrations are indispensable to ensure the sustainability of fish culture initiatives in the seasonal floodplains. Active participation and involvement of the local community people in all stages of fish culture operation beginning from selection of floodplains, formation of floodplain management committee, planning of fish culture activities, exercise of technical intervention, selective stocking with large fingerlings, guarding, monitoring and supervision, adopting harvesting strategies, marketing and distribution of benefits are extremely essential to ensure sustainability of the program. Mutual trust, sense of respect and good working relationship among the committee members are the basic social elements required for the success of community based fish culture initiatives. © 2012 Asian Network for Scientific Information.


Siddiquee M.M.R.,Matshya Bhaban | Rahman M.F.,Matshya Bhaban | Jahan N.,Matshya Bhaban | Jalal K.C.A.,International Islamic University Malaysia | And 2 more authors.
Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences | Year: 2012

The fingerlings of indigenous carps such as catla (Catla catla), rohu (Labeo rohita) and mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala) with exotic carps such as silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix), bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis) and mirror carp (Cyprinus carpio) were cultured together in a fish pond at Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, in order to determine the food electivity, dietary overlap and food competition among indigenous major carps and exotic carps. Phytoplankton (Chlorophyceae, Cyanophyceae), zooplankton (rotifers) were the dominant groups in the cultured pond. Chlorophyceae was dominant in the diet of rohu. Chlorophyceae and rotifers were the preferred food of catla. Mrigal preferred phytoplankton than zooplankton. Rohu showed positive electivity for zooplankton. Silver carp consumed large quantity of phytoplankton and also preferred rotifers. Chlorophyceae was the dominant food group in the diet of bighead. Mirror carp also preferred plant food organisms dominated by Chlorophyceae. Bighead had positive trends towards phytoplankton. Both mrigal and mirror carp had positive electivity towards phytoplankton. The higher level of dietary overlap occurred between rohu and silver carp followed by between rohu and bighead carp and between catla and silver carp. The lowest level of dietary overlaps occurred between rohu and mirror carp. © 2012 Asian Network for Scientific Information.


Jalal K.C.A.,International Islamic University Malaysia | Kamaruzzaman B.Y.,International Islamic University Malaysia | Arshad A.,University Putra Malaysia | Ara R.,University Putra Malaysia | Rahman M.F.,Matshya Bhaban
Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences | Year: 2012

A study on diversity and distribution of fish communities and water qualities were carried out from January 2009 to December 2010 to cover monsoon and non-monsoon at Kuantan estuary, Pahang, Malaysia. A total of 19 species of primary marine fish belong to 12 families were recorded. Out of 311 individuals the fish fauna was dominated by Ariidae followed by Lutjanidae and Lactaridae. As such Ariidae contributes 50% of the fish caught in the study area and its diversity index (H') was 0.97. A The Ariidae family consist of four (4) species; Arius maculatus, Arius sumatranus, Arius tenuispinis and Arius thalassinus. The Ariidae family can be found in all stations as they are euryhaline (highly tolerant to salinity) and this fish family are known to be a hardy estuarine catfish. Among all species in family Ariidae, Arius thalassinus was the most dominant (23%) among all species. As such collected species showed highest species diversity (0.34) followed by Arius tenuispinis (0.25) compared to other species. Arius tenuispinis alone contributed 11.90% among the samples caught from all stations. The fishes were caught and recorded highest in September-December. Pseudorhombus quinque ocellatus, Nibea soldado, Sardinella fimbriata, Toxotes jaculatrix, Dasyatis ushiei, Setipinna taty were the least dominant in the Kuantan estuary with 9.33% of total abundance. Physico-temperatures, such as temperature (22.03-30°C), Conductivity (10.342.43 mS cm-1), TDS (0.06-26.34 mg L-1), salinity (0.05-29.09 ppt), DO (6.37-8.38 mg L-1), pH (4.97-8.03), Chl a (0.01-1.33 μg L-1), nitrite (0.01-0.08 mg L-1), nitrate (0.60-0.88 mg L-1), phosphate (0.24-0.40 mg L-1). Nevertheless, the study envisages that the water quality and fish diversity are still conducive in the Kuantan estuary. The fish diversity of Pahang estuary was high monsoon compared to non-monsoons. The station 4 (LKIM fishing boat jetty and adjacent Hospital Kuantan) is the most polluted area due to the presence of several outskirts could be alarming for the sustainable development of fish and other aquatic organisms in Kuantan estuary in the long run. © 2012 Asian Network for Scientific Information.


Parven M.,Matshya Bhaban | Hossam M.B.,Matshya Bhaban | Rahman M.F.,Matshya Bhaban | Jalal K.C.A.,International Islamic University Malaysia | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Biological Sciences | Year: 2013

Six months-long experiment was carried out in a fish pond at Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU), Mymensingh from September 2008-February 2009 to evaluate the limnological parameters affecting monthly abundance of Chironomid larvae and their role in the diet of catfish, Clarias batrachus. The water-quality and soil parameters were monitored and found to be within suitable range for freshwater aquaculture. The composition of the benthic macro-invertebrates at the bottom indicated that Chironomidae was most dominant group in this pond. The body-weight percentage of the organisms showed that Chironomids and Oligochaetes were major two groups. The quantitative and qualitative studies of Chironomid larvae indicated that there was monthly variation in the abundance of Chironomids where Chironomus was most dominant. The highest (3585.19 m-2) and the lowest (548.15 m-2) abundance of Chironomids in 3 samples were recorded in the month of lanuary 2009 and October 2008, respectively. Gut content analysis suggested that Chironomids was dominant food item in the diet of Clarias batrachus. The maximum 768 and minimum 25 occurrences were recorded in the months of December and October 2008, respectively in 5 fishes sampled from the experimental pond. The electivity indices suggested a shifting to Chironomid larvae from negative selection to positive selection in different months. © 2013 Asian Network for Scientific Information.


Jalal K.C.A.,International Islamic University Malaysia | Shamsuddm A.A.,University of Malaysia, Terengganu | Rahman M.F.,Matshya Bhaban | Nurzatul N.Z.,Matshya Bhaban | Rozihan M.,University Putra Malaysia
Journal of Biological Sciences | Year: 2013

A study was conducted to determine the total content of carotenoids, in Isochrysis sp. under stress condition (nitrogen starvation). Isochrysis sp. was cultured in f/2 medium at optimum light intensity (1200 Lux) with constant aeration (4.5 L min-1) at 8 pH. Salinity of the water was maintained between 20-24 g L-1 and temperature range was 20-24°C. The culture of Isochrysis sp. showed a short lag phase lasting about 24 h followed by exponential phase starting from day 2 until day 10. In day 4, specific growth rate (u.) for Isochrysis sp. was 1.6059 day-1, the highest rate compared to other day. Stress parameter (NO- 3 starvation) was introduced into the mass culture on day 4 by eliminating NO- 3~ in f/2 media. There was considerable declining (p<0.05) in cell count was observed in the absence of nitrogen proving the dependency of carotenoid production over the nitrogen limitation which probably due to the main role played by the nitrogen in various metabolic activities of the cell. The highest total carotenoid per cell was recorded at day 10 with 0.001932347 mg mL-1, whereas the lowest total carotenoid content per cell was observed at day 4 with 0.000100649 mg mL-1. The finding reveals that it is best to harvest the carotenoid on day 10, when the maximum carotenoid can be obtained. © 2013 Asian Network for Scientific Information.


Belton B.,Worldfish Center | Azad A.,Matshya Bhaban
Aquaculture | Year: 2012

Very rapid developments are widely believed to have occurred within Bangladesh's aquaculture sector in recent years, but have yet to be adequately documented. This paper addresses the information gap based on a comprehensive review of literature and data. The current status of pond based aquaculture in Bangladesh is summarized in terms of the quantities and species of fish produced and the technical and social characteristics of the production systems from which they originate. The main systems of pond aquaculture practiced in Bangladesh are analyzed, paying particular attention to the technical, social and economic characteristics of two dominant forms of production. These are categorized here as homestead pond culture (carp dominated low intensity production conducted on a semi-subsistence basis, requiring limited management, labor and capital investment) and entrepreneurial pond culture (semi-intensive or intensive culture entered into as a productive investment with moderate or high capital costs and frequently employing labor). An estimate of national fish production and consumption disaggregated by culture system is presented. The discussion section synthesizes these results and considers their present and future implications. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Matshya Bhaban
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Pakistan journal of biological sciences : PJBS | Year: 2013

Coordination among the different stakeholders at policy planning, implementation and target beneficiary level, particularly among the agencies responsible for development and management of water resources, agriculture and fisheries, is essential for overall sustainable development. Stocking of larger fingerlings at suitable stocking densities of endemic (rohu, catla, mrigal) and exotic (silver carp, bighead carp, common carp/mirror carp) species should be stocked at varying proportion. Floodplain fish production depends only on the natural fertility of the water bodies. Technological interventions should include the installation of low cost bamboo fencing at water inlet and outlet points and setting of ring culverts for maintaining suitable levels of water for fish culture without hampering the production of rice and other crops in the intervention areas, selective stocking with native and exotic carps, restricted fishing for certain period of time and guarding. It is expected to exert positive influences in enhancing the standing crop and biodiversity of non-stocked species of fishes in the intervention seasonal floodplain. Entry of fish larvae, hatchlings and young fry of wild non-stocked fishes into the seasonal floodplains because of large fence spacing (approximately 1.0 cm), could restrict fishing for certain period, undisturbed habitat and guarding could contribute to higher productivity and enhancement of fish biodiversity in the seasonal floodplains. Proper motivation and effective cooperation of the beneficiaries are extremely important to culture fish in the seasonal floodplains under community based management system. Institutional support and constant vigilance from the Department of Fisheries (DoF) and local administrations are indispensable to ensure the sustainability of fish culture initiatives in the seasonal floodplains. Active participation and involvement of the local community people in all stages of fish culture operation beginning from selection of floodplains, formation of floodplain management committee, planning of fish culture activities, exercise of technical intervention, selective stocking with large fingerlings, guarding, monitoring and supervision, adopting harvesting strategies, marketing and distribution of benefits are extremely essential to ensure sustainability of the program. Mutual trust, sense of respect and good working relationship among the committee members are the basic social elements required for the success of community based fish culture initiatives.


PubMed | Matshya Bhaban
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Pakistan journal of biological sciences : PJBS | Year: 2013

The fingerlings of indigenous carps such as catla (Catla catla), rohu (Labeo rohita) and mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala) with exotic carps such as silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix), bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis) and mirror carp (Cyprinus carpio) were cultured together in a fish pond at Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh, in order to determine the food electivity, dietary overlap and food competition among indigenous major carps and exotic carps. Phytoplankton (Chlorophyceae, Cyanophyceae), zooplankton (rotifers) were the dominant groups in the cultured pond. Chlorophyceae was dominant in the diet of rohu. Chlorophyceae and rotifers were the preferred food of catla. Mrigal preferred phytoplankton than zooplankton. Rohu showed positive electivity for zooplankton. Silver carp consumed large quantity of phytoplankton and also preferred rotifers. Chlorophyceae was the dominant food group in the diet of bighead. Mirror carp also preferred plant food organisms dominated by Chlorophyceae. Bighead had positive trends towards phytoplankton. Both mrigal and mirror carp had positive electivity towards phytoplankton. The higher level of dietary overlap occurred between rohu and silver carp followed by between rohu and bighead carp and between catla and silver carp. The lowest level of dietary overlaps occurred between rohu and mirror carp.

Loading Matshya Bhaban collaborators
Loading Matshya Bhaban collaborators