Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Albany, NY, United States

Ngai E.Y.,Chemically Speaking LLC | Fuhrhop R.,Praxair Inc. | Chen J.-R.,National Kaohsiung First University of Science and Technology | Chao J.,Factory Mutual Research Corporation | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Loss Prevention in the Process Industries | Year: 2014

In early 2011, the G-13 Silane Modeling Task Force of the Compressed Gas Association (CGA) proposed a series of tests to better define pyrophoric behavior during unintentional, large-scale releases of silane. The tests were conducted in two phases under the direction of CGA and its guidelines. Phase I took place from June 27 to June 30, 2011, focusing primarily on thermal radiation and the heat transfer from flame impingement due to silane release from a fully open pressure relief device (PRD) on a tonner. Phase II took place on June 19 and 20, 2012, focusing on thermal radiation and explosion overpressure. The results were subsequently utilized to revise CGA G-13 guidelines on the safe handling of silane. In the present two-part papers, the results from the tests are summarized in order to highlight the key findings. The first part of summary described the results of the flame impingement and thermal radiation tests. Three different test series were conducted, including shakedown tests using nitrogen instead of silane, silane flame-impingement tests onto an adjacent target tonner, and heat-flux tests. For comparison with known values in the published literature, thermal radiation of ethylene flame jets was also measured. In addition, metallurgical analyses of the target tonner indicated that the metallurgical properties of the cylinder material were not altered by the flame impingement. The steel surface temperature at the point of impingement was estimated to be below 853.15K and definitely did not exceed 950.15K. Thus, the combination of internal pressure and vessel metal temperature was unlikely to exceed the rupture pressure of the ton cylinder. © 2014. Source


Ngai E.Y.,Chemically Speaking LLC | Fuhrhop R.,Praxair Inc. | Chen J.-R.,National Kaohsiung First University of Science and Technology | Chao J.,Factory Mutual Research Corporation | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Loss Prevention in the Process Industries | Year: 2014

A series of large-scale field trials to better understand the explosion characteristics of silane-air was conducted by the G-13 Silane Task Group under the direction of the Compressed Gas Association (CGA) and its guidelines. Silane was released from a high-pressure source into the open atmosphere, and overpressure measurements of unconfined silane-air explosions were taken at different locations away from the explosion centre. It was found that significant blast effects can result from relatively small releases of silane (around 0.1. kg). It is possible to achieve these small releases during an accidental discharge from a “pigtail“ connection (a small-diameter coiled tube that connects a silane tube trailer to a process). Therefore, accidental silane explosions should be recognized as significant and possible events when handling silane. These results were also used in the proposed revision of ANSI/CGA G-13 Storage and Handling of Silane and Silane Mixtures. © 2014. Source


Marone M.,Matheson | Geib R.,Matheson
Reading for the R and D Community | Year: 2011

The proper equipment and procedures ensure optimal gas system performance. The first consideration for evaluating gas delivery systems and components is the hazardous nature of the gas service and the safe handling of this gas. The purpose of a gas cabinet in such a system is to confine and control a gas hazard within the cabinet while preserving the safety of the working environment outside of the cabinet. Purity requirements of the intended gas service are divided into three categories, such as general purpose, high purity, and ultra high purity. Lower purity gases and economy-grade regulators and other equipment are unsuitable for laboratory use. Material compatibility with the intended gas service is important when selecting regulators, while pressure service is another critical factor involved in regulator selection. Source


Marone M.,Matheson | Geib R.,Matheson
American Laboratory | Year: 2011

Suppliers of compressed gases go out of their way to deliver gas products that meet customer requirements for purity, mixture accuracy, and other specifi cations. Most gases are delivered in conventional high-pressure cylinders, while other gas products are delivered in bulk or small bulk containers and dewars. Whatever the means of delivery and storage, these gases are handled, regulated, and distributed by the user. In the process, the gases are exposed to different equipment and systems that can either maintain or degrade gas purity. This article discusses materials of construction, selection criteria, general precautions, and other issues pertaining to gas pressure regulators. Source


Marone M.,Matheson | Geib R.,Matheson
American Laboratory | Year: 2011

In any laboratory or production setting, there are numerous circumstances that can lead to an unsafe condition, resulting in injury or even loss of life. There is, of course, no substitute for the "human factor"-personal preparation, training, and vigilance. However, safety equipment is designed to add mechanization and automation to safety programs. Careful attention to gases, applications, and equipment choices will help to ensure safe gas delivery to the point of use. Source

Discover hidden collaborations