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News Article | July 7, 2017
Site: www.materialstoday.com

A team of researchers at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has identified a nickel oxide compound as an unconventional but promising candidate material for high-temperature superconductivity. The team successfully synthesized single crystals of a metallic trilayer nickelate compound, a feat the researchers believe to be a first. This nickel oxide compound does not actually superconduct, said John Mitchell, associate director of the laboratory's Materials Science Division, who led the project, which combined crystal growth, X-ray spectroscopy and computational theory. But, he added, "It's poised for superconductivity in a way not found in other nickel oxides. We're very hopeful that all we have to do now is find the right electron concentration." Mitchell and seven co-authors report their results in a paper in Nature Physics. Superconducting materials are technologically important because electricity flows through them without resistance. High-temperature superconductors could lead to faster, more efficient electronic devices, power grids that can transmit electricity without energy loss and ultra-fast levitating trains that ride frictionless magnets instead of rails. Only low-temperature superconductivity seemed possible before 1986, but materials that superconduct at low temperatures are impractical because they must first be cooled to hundreds of degrees below zero. In 1986, however, the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in copper oxide compounds known as cuprates suggested new technological potential for the phenomenon. But after three decades of ensuing research, exactly how cuprate superconductivity works remains a defining problem in the field. One approach to solving this problem has been to study compounds that have similar crystal, magnetic and electronic structures to the cuprates. Nickel-based oxides – nickelates – have long been considered as potential cuprate analogs because nickel sits immediately adjacent to copper in the periodic table. Thus far, Mitchell noted, "that's been an unsuccessful quest". As he and his co-authors noted in their Nature Physics paper: "None of these analogs have been superconducting, and few are even metallic." The nickelate that the Argonne team has created is a quasi-two-dimensional trilayer compound, meaning it comprises three layers of nickel oxide that are separated by spacer layers of praseodymium oxide. "Thus it looks more two-dimensional than three-dimensional, structurally and electronically," Mitchell said. This nickelate shares its quasi-two-dimensional trilayer structure with a similar compound containing lanthanum rather than praseodymium. But the lanthanum analog is non-metallic and adopts a so-called ‘charge-stripe’ phase, an electronic property that makes the material an insulator, the opposite of a superconductor. "For some yet-unknown reason, the praseodymium system does not form these stripes," Mitchell said. "It remains metallic and so is certainly the more likely candidate for superconductivity." Argonne is one of a few laboratories in the world where the compound could be created, thanks to the special abilities of the Materials Science Division's high-pressure optical-image floating zone furnace. This furnace can attain pressures of 150 atmospheres (equivalent to the crushing pressures found at oceanic depths of nearly 5000 feet) and temperatures of approximately 2000°C, just the conditions needed to grow the crystals. "We didn't know for sure we could make these materials," said Argonne postdoctoral researcher Junjie Zhang, first author on the study. But they were able to grow nickelate crystals measuring a few millimeters in diameter (a small fraction of an inch). The research team verified that the electronic structure of the nickelate resembles that of cuprate materials by taking X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at the Advanced Photon Source, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, and by performing density functional theory calculations. Materials scientists use density functional theory to investigate the electronic properties of condensed matter systems. "I've spent my entire career not making high-temperature superconductors," Mitchell joked. But that could change in the next phase of his team's research: attempting to induce superconductivity in their nickelate material using a chemical process called electron doping, in which impurities are deliberately added to a material to influence its properties. This story is adapted from material from Argonne National Laboratory, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. Link to original source.


The team successfully synthesized single crystals of a metallic trilayer nickelate compound, a feat the researchers believe to be a first. "It's poised for superconductivity in a way not found in other nickel oxides. We're very hopeful that all we have to do now is find the right electron concentration." This nickel oxide compound does not superconduct, said John Mitchell, an Argonne Distinguished Fellow and associate director of the laboratory's Materials Science Division, who led the project, which combined crystal growth, X-ray spectroscopy, and computational theory. But, he added, "It's poised for superconductivity in a way not found in other nickel oxides. We're very hopeful that all we have to do now is find the right electron concentration." Mitchell and seven co-authors announced their results in this week's issue of Nature Physics. Superconducting materials are technologically important because electricity flows through them without resistance. High-temperature superconductors could lead to faster, more efficient electronic devices, grids that can transmit power without energy loss and ultra-fast levitating trains that ride frictionless magnets instead of rails. Only low-temperature superconductivity seemed possible before 1986, but materials that superconduct at low temperatures are impractical because they must first be cooled to hundreds of degrees below zero. In 1986, however, discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in copper oxide compounds called cuprates engendered new technological potential for the phenomenon. But after three decades of ensuing research, exactly how cuprate superconductivity works remains a defining problem in the field. One approach to solving this problem has been to study compounds that have similar crystal, magnetic and electronic structures to the cuprates. Nickel-based oxides - nickelates - have long been considered as potential cuprate analogs because the element sits immediately adjacent to copper in the periodic table. Thus far, Mitchell noted, "That's been an unsuccessful quest." As he and his co-authors noted in their Nature Physics paper, "None of these analogs have been superconducting, and few are even metallic." The nickelate that the Argonne team has created is a quasi-two-dimensional trilayer compound, meaning that it consists of three layers of nickel oxide that are separated by spacer layers of praseodymium oxide. "Thus it looks more two-dimensional than three-dimensional, structurally and electronically," Mitchell said. This nickelate and a compound containing lanthanum rather than praseodymium both share the quasi-two-dimensional trilayer structure. But the lanthanum analog is non-metallic and adopts a so-called "charge-stripe" phase, an electronic property that makes the material an insulator, the opposite of a superconductor. "For some yet-unknown reason, the praseodymium system does not form these stripes," Mitchell said. "It remains metallic and so is certainly the more likely candidate for superconductivity." Argonne is one of a few laboratories in the world where the compound could be created. The Materials Science Division's high-pressure optical-image floating zone furnace has special capabilities. It can attain pressures of 150 atmospheres (equivalent to the crushing pressures found at oceanic depths of nearly 5,000 feet) and temperatures of approximately 2,000 degrees Celsius (more than 3,600 degrees Fahrenheit), conditions needed to grow the crystals. "We didn't know for sure we could make these materials," said Argonne postdoctoral researcher Junjie Zhang, the first author on the study. But indeed, they managed to grow the crystals measuring a few millimeters in diameter (a small fraction of an inch). The research team verified that the electronic structure of the nickelate resembles that of cupratematerials by taking X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at the Advanced Photon Source, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, and by performing density functional theory calculations. Materials scientists use density functional theory to investigate the electronic properties of condensed matter systems. "I've spent my entire career not making high-temperature superconductors," Mitchell joked. But that could change in the next phase of his team's research: attempting to induce superconductivity in their nickelate material using a chemical process called electron doping, in which impurities are deliberately added to a material to influence its properties. Explore further: Surprising stripes in a 'bad metal' offer clues to high-temperature superconductivity More information: Junjie Zhang et al, Large orbital polarization in a metallic square-planar nickelate, Nature Physics (2017). DOI: 10.1038/nphys4149


A team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has identified a nickel oxide compound as an unconventional but promising candidate material for high-temperature superconductivity. The team successfully synthesized single crystals of a metallic trilayer nickelate compound, a feat the researchers believe to be a first. This nickel oxide compound does not superconduct, said John Mitchell, an Argonne Distinguished Fellow and associate director of the laboratory’s Materials Science Division, who led the project, which combined crystal growth, X-ray spectroscopy, and computational theory. But, he added, “It’s poised for superconductivity in a way not found in other nickel oxides. We’re very hopeful that all we have to do now is find the right electron concentration.” Mitchell and seven co-authors announced their results in this week’s issue of Nature Physics. Superconducting materials are technologically important because electricity flows through them without resistance. High-temperature superconductors could lead to faster, more efficient electronic devices, grids that can transmit power without energy loss and ultra-fast levitating trains that ride frictionless magnets instead of rails. Only low-temperature superconductivity seemed possible before 1986, but materials that superconduct at low temperatures are impractical because they must first be cooled to hundreds of degrees below zero. In 1986, however, discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in copper oxide compounds called cuprates engendered new technological potential for the phenomenon. But after three decades of ensuing research, exactly how cuprate superconductivity works remains a defining problem in the field. One approach to solving this problem has been to study compounds that have similar crystal, magnetic and electronic structures to the cuprates. Nickel-based oxides – nickelates – have long been considered as potential cuprate analogs because the element sits immediately adjacent to copper in the periodic table. Thus far, Mitchell noted, “That’s been an unsuccessful quest.” As he and his co-authors noted in their Nature Physics paper, “None of these analogs have been superconducting, and few are even metallic.” The nickelate that the Argonne team has created is a quasi-two-dimensional trilayer compound, meaning that it consists of three layers of nickel oxide that are separated by spacer layers of praseodymium oxide. “Thus it looks more two-dimensional than three-dimensional, structurally and electronically,” Mitchell said. This nickelate and a compound containing lanthanum rather than praseodymium both share the quasi-two-dimensional trilayer structure. But the lanthanum analog is non-metallic and adopts a so-called “charge-stripe” phase, an electronic property that makes the material an insulator, the opposite of a superconductor. “For some yet-unknown reason, the praseodymium system does not form these stripes,” Mitchell said. “It remains metallic and so is certainly the more likely candidate for superconductivity.” Argonne is one of a few laboratories in the world where the compound could be created. The Materials Science Division’s high-pressure optical-image floating zone furnace has special capabilities. It can attain pressures of 150 atmospheres (equivalent to the crushing pressures found at oceanic depths of nearly 5,000 feet) and temperatures of approximately 2,000 degrees Celsius (more than 3,600 degrees Fahrenheit), conditions needed to grow the crystals. “We didn’t know for sure we could make these materials,” said Argonne postdoctoral researcher Junjie Zhang, the first author on the study. But indeed, they managed to grow the crystals measuring a few millimeters in diameter (a small fraction of an inch). The research team verified that the electronic structure of the nickelate resembles that of cuprate materials by taking X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at the Advanced Photon Source, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, and by performing density functional theory calculations. Materials scientists use density functional theory to investigate the electronic properties of condensed matter systems. “I’ve spent my entire career not making high-temperature superconductors,” Mitchell joked. But that could change in the next phase of his team’s research: attempting to induce superconductivity in their nickelate material using a chemical process called electron doping, in which impurities are deliberately added to a material to influence its properties. For the original study published in Nature Physics, see “Large orbital polarization in a metallic square-planar nickelate.” Other Argonne authors included Materials Science Division scientists Antia Botana, Daniel Phelan, Hong Zheng, Michael Norman, and John Freeland of the Advanced Photon Source; the other author was Victor Pardo of the University of Santiago de Compostela in Spain. Funding was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science and the National Science Foundation.


News Article | June 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has identified a nickel oxide compound as an unconventional but promising candidate material for high-temperature superconductivity. The team successfully synthesized single crystals of a metallic trilayer nickelate compound, a feat the researchers believe to be a first. "It's poised for superconductivity in a way not found in other nickel oxides. We're very hopeful that all we have to do now is find the right electron concentration." This nickel oxide compound does not superconduct, said John Mitchell, an Argonne Distinguished Fellow and associate director of the laboratory's Materials Science Division, who led the project, which combined crystal growth, X-ray spectroscopy, and computational theory. But, he added, "It's poised for superconductivity in a way not found in other nickel oxides. We're very hopeful that all we have to do now is find the right electron concentration." Mitchell and seven co-authors announced their results in this week's issue of Nature Physics. Superconducting materials are technologically important because electricity flows through them without resistance. High-temperature superconductors could lead to faster, more efficient electronic devices, grids that can transmit power without energy loss and ultra-fast levitating trains that ride frictionless magnets instead of rails. Only low-temperature superconductivity seemed possible before 1986, but materials that superconduct at low temperatures are impractical because they must first be cooled to hundreds of degrees below zero. In 1986, however, discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in copper oxide compounds called cuprates engendered new technological potential for the phenomenon. But after three decades of ensuing research, exactly how cuprate superconductivity works remains a defining problem in the field. One approach to solving this problem has been to study compounds that have similar crystal, magnetic and electronic structures to the cuprates. Nickel-based oxides - nickelates - have long been considered as potential cuprate analogs because the element sits immediately adjacent to copper in the periodic table. Thus far, Mitchell noted, "That's been an unsuccessful quest." As he and his co-authors noted in their Nature Physics paper, "None of these analogs have been superconducting, and few are even metallic." The nickelate that the Argonne team has created is a quasi-two-dimensional trilayer compound, meaning that it consists of three layers of nickel oxide that are separated by spacer layers of praseodymium oxide. "Thus it looks more two-dimensional than three-dimensional, structurally and electronically," Mitchell said. This nickelate and a compound containing lanthanum rather than praseodymium both share the quasi-two-dimensional trilayer structure. But the lanthanum analog is non-metallic and adopts a so-called "charge-stripe" phase, an electronic property that makes the material an insulator, the opposite of a superconductor. "For some yet-unknown reason, the praseodymium system does not form these stripes," Mitchell said. "It remains metallic and so is certainly the more likely candidate for superconductivity." Argonne is one of a few laboratories in the world where the compound could be created. The Materials Science Division's high-pressure optical-image floating zone furnace has special capabilities. It can attain pressures of 150 atmospheres (equivalent to the crushing pressures found at oceanic depths of nearly 5,000 feet) and temperatures of approximately 2,000 degrees Celsius (more than 3,600 degrees Fahrenheit), conditions needed to grow the crystals. "We didn't know for sure we could make these materials," said Argonne postdoctoral researcher Junjie Zhang, the first author on the study. But indeed, they managed to grow the crystals measuring a few millimeters in diameter (a small fraction of an inch). The research team verified that the electronic structure of the nickelate resembles that of cuprate materials by taking X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at the Advanced Photon Source, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, and by performing density functional theory calculations. Materials scientists use density functional theory to investigate the electronic properties of condensed matter systems. "I've spent my entire career not making high-temperature superconductors," Mitchell joked. But that could change in the next phase of his team's research: attempting to induce superconductivity in their nickelate material using a chemical process called electron doping, in which impurities are deliberately added to a material to influence its properties. For the original study published in Nature Physics, see "Large orbital polarization in a metallic square-planar nickelate." Other Argonne authors included Materials Science Division scientists Antia Botana, Daniel Phelan, Hong Zheng, Michael Norman, and John Freeland of the Advanced Photon Source; the other author was Victor Pardo of the University of Santiago de Compostela in Spain. Funding was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science and the National Science Foundation. Argonne National Laboratory seeks solutions to pressing national problems in science and technology. The nation's first national laboratory, Argonne conducts leading-edge basic and applied scientific research in virtually every scientific discipline. Argonne researchers work closely with researchers from hundreds of companies, universities, and federal, state and municipal agencies to help them solve their specific problems, advance America's scientific leadership and prepare the nation for a better future. With employees from more than 60 nations, Argonne is managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, visit the Office of Science website.


News Article | June 17, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

A team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has identified a nickel oxide compound as an unconventional but promising candidate material for high-temperature superconductivity. The team successfully synthesized single crystals of a metallic trilayer nickelate compound, a feat the researchers believe to be a first. "It's poised for superconductivity in a way not found in other nickel oxides. We're very hopeful that all we have to do now is find the right electron concentration." This nickel oxide compound does not superconduct, said John Mitchell, an Argonne Distinguished Fellow and associate director of the laboratory's Materials Science Division, who led the project, which combined crystal growth, X-ray spectroscopy, and computational theory. But, he added, "It's poised for superconductivity in a way not found in other nickel oxides. We're very hopeful that all we have to do now is find the right electron concentration." Mitchell and seven co-authors announced their results in this week's issue of Nature Physics. Superconducting materials are technologically important because electricity flows through them without resistance. High-temperature superconductors could lead to faster, more efficient electronic devices, grids that can transmit power without energy loss and ultra-fast levitating trains that ride frictionless magnets instead of rails. Only low-temperature superconductivity seemed possible before 1986, but materials that superconduct at low temperatures are impractical because they must first be cooled to hundreds of degrees below zero. In 1986, however, discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in copper oxide compounds called cuprates engendered new technological potential for the phenomenon. But after three decades of ensuing research, exactly how cuprate superconductivity works remains a defining problem in the field. One approach to solving this problem has been to study compounds that have similar crystal, magnetic and electronic structures to the cuprates. Nickel-based oxides -- nickelates -- have long been considered as potential cuprate analogs because the element sits immediately adjacent to copper in the periodic table. Thus far, Mitchell noted, "That's been an unsuccessful quest." As he and his co-authors noted in their Nature Physics paper, "None of these analogs have been superconducting, and few are even metallic." The nickelate that the Argonne team has created is a quasi-two-dimensional trilayer compound, meaning that it consists of three layers of nickel oxide that are separated by spacer layers of praseodymium oxide. "Thus it looks more two-dimensional than three-dimensional, structurally and electronically," Mitchell said. This nickelate and a compound containing lanthanum rather than praseodymium both share the quasi-two-dimensional trilayer structure. But the lanthanum analog is non-metallic and adopts a so-called "charge-stripe" phase, an electronic property that makes the material an insulator, the opposite of a superconductor. "For some yet-unknown reason, the praseodymium system does not form these stripes," Mitchell said. "It remains metallic and so is certainly the more likely candidate for superconductivity." Argonne is one of a few laboratories in the world where the compound could be created. The Materials Science Division's high-pressure optical-image floating zone furnace has special capabilities. It can attain pressures of 150 atmospheres (equivalent to the crushing pressures found at oceanic depths of nearly 5,000 feet) and temperatures of approximately 2,000 degrees Celsius (more than 3,600 degrees Fahrenheit), conditions needed to grow the crystals. "We didn't know for sure we could make these materials," said Argonne postdoctoral researcher Junjie Zhang, the first author on the study. But indeed, they managed to grow the crystals measuring a few millimeters in diameter (a small fraction of an inch). The research team verified that the electronic structure of the nickelate resembles that of cuprate materials by taking X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at the Advanced Photon Source, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, and by performing density functional theory calculations. Materials scientists use density functional theory to investigate the electronic properties of condensed matter systems. "I've spent my entire career not making high-temperature superconductors," Mitchell joked. But that could change in the next phase of his team's research: attempting to induce superconductivity in their nickelate material using a chemical process called electron doping, in which impurities are deliberately added to a material to influence its properties.


News Article | June 5, 2017
Site: www.nanotech-now.com

Abstract: Stabilization of ultrathin (hydroxy)oxide films on transition metal substrates for electrochemical energy conversion Zhenhua Zeng1, Kee-Chul Chang2, Joseph Kubal1, Nenad M. Markovic2 and Jeffrey Greeley1 1 School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 2 Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois Design of cost-effective electrocatalysts with enhanced stability and activity is of paramount importance for the next generation of energy conversion systems, including fuel cells and electrolysers. However, electrocatalytic materials generally improve one of these properties at the expense of the other. Here, using density functional theory calculations and electrochemical surface science measurements, we explore atomic-level features of ultrathin (hydroxy)oxide films on transition metal substrates and demonstrate that these films exhibit both excellent stability and activity for electrocatalytic applications. The films adopt structures with stabilities that significantly exceed bulk Pourbaix limits, including stoichiometries not found in bulk and properties that are tunable by controlling voltage, film composition, and substrate identity. Using nickel (hydroxy)oxide/Pt(111) as an example, we further show how the films enhance activity for hydrogen evolution through a bifunctional effect. The results suggest design principles for this class of electrocatalysts with simultaneously enhanced stability and activity for energy conversion. Purdue University scientists' simulations have unraveled the mystery of a new electrocatalyst that may solve a significant problem associated with fuel cells and electrolyzers. Fuel cells, which use chemical reactions to produce energy, and electrolyzers, which convert energy into hydrogen or other gases, use electrocatalysts to promote chemical reactions. Electrocatalysts that can activate such reactions tend to be unstable because they can corrode in the highly acidic or basic water solutions that are used in fuel cells or electrolyzers. A team led by Jeffrey Greeley, an associate professor of chemical engineering, has identified the structure for an electrocatalyst made of nickel nanoislands deposited on platinum that is both active and stable. This design created properties in the nickel that Greeley said were unexpected but highly beneficial. "The reactions led to very stable structures that we would not predict by just looking at the properties of nickel," Greeley said. "It turned out to be quite a surprise." Greeley's team and collaborators working at Argonne National Laboratory had noticed that nickel placed on a platinum substrate showed potential as an electrocatalyst. Greeley's lab then went to work to figure out how an electrocatalyst with this composition could be both active and stable. Greeley's team simulated different thicknesses and diameters of nickel on platinum as well as voltages and pH levels in the cells. Placing nickel only one or two atomic layers in thickness and one to two nanometers in diameter created the conditions they wanted. "They're like little islands of nickel sitting on a sea of platinum," Greeley said. The ultra-thin layer of nickel is key, Greeley said, because it's at the point where the two metals come together that all the electrochemical activity occurs. And since there are only one or two atomic layers of nickel, almost all of it is reacting with the platinum. That not only creates the catalysis needed, but changes the nickel in a way that keeps it from oxidizing, providing the stability. Collaborators at Argonne then analyzed the nickel-platinum structure and confirmed the properties Greeley and his team expected the electrocatalyst to have. Next, Greeley plans to test similar structures with different metals, such as replacing platinum with gold or the nickel with cobalt, as well as modifying pH and voltages. He believes other more stable and active combinations may be found using his computational analysis. ### The U.S. Department of Energy supported the research. The research was published in May by the journal Nature Energy. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | September 12, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

The DowDuPont Board of Directors approved the changes based on: a thorough review led by the lead independent directors, which included recommendations provided by McKinsey & Company; a comprehensive business and operational analysis leveraging knowledge gained over the past 20 months of pre-merger planning; and input from a wide range of stakeholders, including both investors and financial advisors. As a result of this comprehensive analysis, DowDuPont will realign the following businesses to the Specialty Products Division from the Materials Science Division: On a forecasted 2017 basis, the businesses that will be realigned to the Specialty Products Division account for total net sales of more than $8 billion and operating EBITDA of approximately $2.4 billion, including approximately 40 percent of the heritage Dow Corning EBITDA. Relative to the original merger agreement, the adjustments are as follows: "Our DowDuPont Board is fully aligned and confident that these targeted portfolio adjustments are the right actions to take and will benefit all stakeholders over the long term," said Andrew Liveris, executive chairman of DowDuPont. "They bear out the clear results of a significant comprehensive analysis the Dow and DuPont boards undertook over the past many months, which benefited from a fresh look provided by independent, third-party external advisors, in particular McKinsey & Company. We built on the wealth of knowledge gained as both companies advanced our integration work together. These adjustments are also fully supported by the Materials Science Advisory Committee, as they better align select businesses with the market verticals they serve, while maintaining integration and innovation strengths within strategic value chains. As a result, both our Materials Science and Specialty Products divisions will be well-positioned to better anticipate and meet customer needs through focused innovation and technology development that will deliver accelerated growth from a broader suite of best-in-class products." "The changes we are making will enhance the competitive advantages and value creation potential of DowDuPont and ensure that the intended companies have the best possible foundation to drive long-term value for all stakeholders," said Ed Breen, chief executive officer of DowDuPont. "The facts clearly supported the strategic logic of this portfolio configuration. Each of the intended companies will have even stronger competitive positioning, high value-added customer solutions, and a distinct and compelling investment thesis, while maximizing opportunities for strategic growth and synergies. With clear focus, each will serve attractive and growing markets, investing in innovation and delivering greater returns for shareholders." DowDuPont reiterates its previously announced plans to achieve run-rate cost synergies of approximately $3 billion and approximately $1 billion in growth synergies. Following the portfolio realignments, the three intended companies of DowDuPont are as follows: The intended company will be headquartered in Wilmington, Delaware, with global business centers in Johnston, Iowa, and Indianapolis, Indiana. The intended company will maintain the Dow™ brand and will be headquartered in Midland, Michigan. The intended company will be headquartered in Wilmington, Delaware. The Company will discuss the results of its review and the path forward during a live webcast call today beginning at 8:30 a.m. ET. Listeners may also join via telephone at +1.719.325.4910. The slide presentation that accompanies the conference call will be posted on the DowDuPont Investor Relations events and presentations page. A replay of the webcast will also be available on the investor events and presentations page of www.dow-dupont.com. About DowDuPont DowDuPont (NYSE: DWDP) is a holding company comprised of The Dow Chemical Company and DuPont with the intent to form strong, independent, publicly traded companies in agriculture, materials science and specialty products sectors that will lead their respective industries through productive, science-based innovation to meet the needs of customers and help solve global challenges. For more information, please visit us at www.dow-dupont.com. Cautionary Statement About Forward-Looking Statements This communication contains "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the federal securities laws, including Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. In this context, forward-looking statements often address expected future business and financial performance and financial condition, and often contain words such as "expect," "anticipate," "intend," "plan," "believe," "seek," "see," "will," "would," "target," similar expressions, and variations or negatives of these words. On Dec. 11, 2015, The Dow Chemical Company ("Dow") and E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company ("DuPont") announced entry into an Agreement and Plan of Merger, as amended on March 31, 2017, (the "Merger Agreement") under which the companies would combine in an all-stock merger of equals transaction (the "Merger Transaction"). Effective Aug. 31, 2017, the Merger Transaction was completed and each of Dow and DuPont became subsidiaries of DowDuPont Inc. ("DowDuPont"). For more information, please see each of DowDuPont's, Dow's and DuPont's latest annual, quarterly and current reports on Forms 10-K, 10-Q and 8-K, as the case may be, and the joint proxy statement/prospectus included in the registration statement on Form S-4 filed by DowDuPont with the SEC on March 1, 2016 (File No. 333-209869), as last amended on June 7, 2016, and declared effective by the SEC on June 9, 2016 (the "Registration Statement") in connection with the Merger Transaction. Forward-looking statements by their nature address matters that are, to different degrees, uncertain, including the intended separation of DowDuPont's agriculture, materials science and specialty products businesses in one or more tax efficient transactions on anticipated terms (the "Intended Business Separations"). Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are based on certain assumptions and expectations of future events which may not be realized. Forward-looking statements also involve risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond the company's control. Some of the important factors that could cause DowDuPont's, Dow's or DuPont's actual results to differ materially from those projected in any such forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to: (i) successful integration of the respective agriculture, materials science and specialty products businesses of Dow and DuPont, including anticipated tax treatment, unforeseen liabilities, future capital expenditures, revenues, expenses, earnings, productivity actions, economic performance, indebtedness, financial condition, losses, future prospects, business and management strategies for the management, expansion and growth of the combined operations; (ii) impact of the divestitures required as a condition to consummation of the Merger Transaction as well as other conditional commitments; (iii) achievement of the anticipated synergies by DowDuPont's agriculture, materials science and specialty products businesses; (iv) risks associated with the Intended Business Separations, including those that may result from the comprehensive portfolio review undertaken by the DowDuPont board, changes and timing, including a number of conditions which could delay, prevent or otherwise adversely affect the proposed transactions, including possible issues or delays in obtaining required regulatory approvals or clearances related to the Intended Business Separations, disruptions in the financial markets or other potential barriers; (v) the risk that disruptions from the Intended Business Separations will harm DowDuPont's business (either directly or as conducted by and through Dow or DuPont), including current plans and operations; (vi) the ability to retain and hire key personnel; (vii) potential adverse reactions or changes to business relationships resulting from the completion of the merger or the Intended Business Separations; (viii) uncertainty as to the long-term value of DowDuPont common stock; (ix) continued availability of capital and financing and rating agency actions; (x) legislative, regulatory and economic developments; (xi) potential business uncertainty, including changes to existing business relationships, during the pendency of the Intended Business Separations that could affect the company's financial performance and (xii) unpredictability and severity of catastrophic events, including, but not limited to, acts of terrorism or outbreak of war or hostilities, as well as management's response to any of the aforementioned factors. These risks, as well as other risks associated with the merger and the Intended Business Separations, are more fully discussed in (1) the Registration Statement and (2) the current, periodic and annual reports filed with the SEC by DowDuPont and to the extent incorporated by reference into the Registration Statement, by Dow and DuPont. While the list of factors presented here is, and the list of factors presented in the Registration Statement are, considered representative, no such list should be considered to be a complete statement of all potential risks and uncertainties. Unlisted factors may present significant additional obstacles to the realization of forward-looking statements. Consequences of material differences in results as compared with those anticipated in the forward-looking statements could include, among other things, business disruption, operational problems, financial loss, legal liability to third parties and similar risks, any of which could have a material adverse effect on DowDuPont's, Dow's or DuPont's consolidated financial condition, results of operations, credit rating or liquidity. None of DowDuPont, Dow or DuPont assumes any obligation to publicly provide revisions or updates to any forward-looking statements regarding the proposed transaction and intended business separations, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise, should circumstances change, except as otherwise required by securities and other applicable laws.


News Article | September 19, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

MIDLAND, Mich.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Twenty innovative new products from The Dow Chemical Company, a subsidiary of DowDuPont (NYSE: DWDP), were named finalists for the 2017 R&D 100 Awards. The R&D 100 Awards, a signature program of R&D Magazine, is designed to identify and celebrate the top 100 revolutionary technologies introduced during the past year. Winners of the R&D 100 Awards will be announced in November 2017. “ We strive to create new products that meet customer needs and bring value to our shareholders. It is particularly gratifying when these products are recognized as leading innovations by the R&D 100 Awards committee,” said A.N. Sreeram, senior vice president, Research and Development, and chief technology officer for Dow. “ Our performance this year shows the breadth and depth of Dow technology. I’m extremely proud of the women and men behind these products, who continue to drive our innovation engine and address the world’s global challenges.” Learn more about the Dow finalists: For more information about Dow’s innovation engine, visit Science and Sustainability on www.dow.com. DowDuPont Materials Science, a business division of DowDuPont (NYSE: DWDP), combines science and technology knowledge to develop premier materials science solutions that are essential to human progress. The division has one of the strongest and broadest toolkits in the industry, with robust technology, asset integration, scale and competitive capabilities that enable it to address complex global issues. DowDuPont Materials Science’s market-driven, industry-leading portfolio of advanced materials, industrial intermediates, and plastics businesses deliver a broad range of differentiated technology-based products and solutions for customers in high-growth markets such as packaging, infrastructure, and consumer care. DowDuPont intends to separate the Materials Science Division into an independent, publicly traded company. More information can be found at www.dow-dupont.com. ®TM Trademark of The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”) or an affiliated company of Dow


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.spie.org

From the SPIE Photonics West Show Daily : Three plenary speakers at LASE 2017 discussed the LIGO discovery of gravitational waves in space, laser-based direct-write methods, and high-power EUV light sources for lithography. For more than a quarter of a century, Karsten Danzmann has dedicated his career to developing technology that could expand our understanding of the universe by detecting gravitational waves emanating from exotic objects in space. On September 14, 2015, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) finally did just that. For the first time, US LIGO detectors in Livingston, LA, and Hanford, WA, heard the first "peep" from an event in the distant universe — in this case the collision of two black holes. The event confirmed a major prediction of Albert Einstein's 1915 general theory of relativity and opened a new window into the cosmos. It was such a major breakthrough that it took several days for the LIGO team to accept that it might actually be real, according to Danzmann, director of the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, a member of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration. And it was another five months before they made their findings public. "I've been chasing this for 27 years, and when it finally happened it was unbelievable," said Danzmann, who noted that a second, similar event, the detection of gravitational waves produced by two black holes colliding 1.4 billion light years away, was captured in June 2016 at the same two observatories. "We've been looking at the universe with our eyes for thousands of years, and we know it looks very different depending on whether we look at it with visible light, infrared light, gamma rays, xrays, ... but we haven't been able to hear it. And suddenly now we can. And we have hope that the dark side of the universe, which makes up 99% of the universe, is now accessible to us." During the LASE plenary session at SPIE Photonics West 2017 in February, Danzmann's enthusiasm was contagious as he described the developments leading up to that historic moment, from the physics and technology to the thousands of people involved worldwide for decades (the first published paper, in Physics Review Letters, listed 1004 authors from 133 institutions). For Danzmann, one of the key turning points came when Advanced LIGO, a $200 million upgrade to LIGO, was unveiled in mid-2015. With the upgrade, which took five years to complete, the observatories are now 10 times more sensitive than their predecessors, thanks to advances in the optical layout, new high-power (165W) stabilized laser systems, advanced mirror suspension, and improved pre-isolation for detecting very low frequencies, according to Danzmann. "The upgrade to Advanced LIGO was drastic," Danzmann said. "The building is still the same, and the stainless steel of vacuum tubes are the same, but everything else has changed." Danzmann is equally excited about a more recent development: LISA Pathfinder, a satellite mission launched in December 2015 whose payload includes the first laser interferometer in space. "On the ground we are listening to the high frequencies of the universe, but if we want to listen to low frequencies, we have to go into space," said Danzmann, who is co-principal investigator on the LISA technology package. "Some of the most interesting things in the universe are supermassive black holes. When galaxies collide, which happens all the time, these super black holes merge and emit a huge signal, and that is what we want to listen to in space." Another LASE plenary talk featured an overview of the current state-of-the-art in using laser-based direct-write (LDW) methods to print hybrid electronics. The talk was given by Alberto Pique, acting head of the Materials and Sensor Branch of the Materials Science Division at the US Naval Research Laboratory. "The goal is very simple: can we go from a design to a printed part that is not faithful in a structural sense but in a functional sense?" Pique posited. "To do that, we need a substrate, we need to wire it up, place the devices, then connect the wires and devices. If you do it right, you end up with a functional circuit." This is where additive manufacturing (AM) comes in. AM is considered a game changer for design and fabrication of 3D parts by reducing the number of steps from concept to part, while direct-write processes make it possible to fabricate custom electronics in less time and at lower cost than other techniques. Combining the two paves the way for more efficient and cost-effective printing of hybrid electronics. The ability of LDW to deposit functional materials over a wide viscosity range onto many diverse surfaces makes it unique among direct write processes, Pique noted. For example, when manufacturing inkjet nozzles, "you have to be careful about the material you put on the nozzle and you have to worry about the nature of the fluid. But when you use the LDW forward transfer technique, the nature of material is not that critical." Advances in lasers, materials, and positioning have spurred the development of LDW in AM, he added. In particular, the availability of high-repetition rate solid-state UV lasers with stable, moderate energies has allowed LDW to deposit materials rapidly in all three dimensions. By comparison, low-rep rate UV lasers with more uniform beam profiles have enabled printing larger area voxels, which also speeds up the LDW process. "Over the years, we have shown that with LDW we can both add and remove material, and this gives the laser technique an edge (over other direct-write techniques) because you can do two things with the same set up," Pique said. "The same system performs both additive and subtractive processes." In the final LASE plenary talk, Hakaru Mizoguchi, executive vice president of Gigaphoton, provided an update on the company's efforts to develop high-power EUV light sources for high-volume manufacturing (HVM) lithography. In July 2016, Gigaphoton demonstrated 250W light output at 4% conversion efficiency with a laser-produced plasma (LPP) light source prototype for EUV scanners. Since then, Gigaphoton has continued to test and refine its EUV light sources, with a goal of eventually reaching 500W, according to Mizoguchi. Photolithography equipment manufacturers are keen for a 250W power EUV source to deliver the kind of wafer productivity throughput their customers demand. To achieve these powers, Gigaphoton uses a dual-laser "priming" pulse from a yv04 (vanadate) laser ahead of a nanosecond-duration carbon dioxide blast, plus sub 20 μm micro droplet supply technology, proprietary energy control technology, and magnetic field-enabled debris mitigation technology. In anticipation of introducing these systems to the commercial market, the company is preparing to move into a new headquarters in Japan that doubles its office space and provides 1.5 times the production space, Mizoguchi noted. Symposium chairs for LASE 2017 were SPIE Fellows Koji Sugioka of RIKEN (Japan) and Reinhart Poprawe of Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik (Germany). Cochairs were SPIE Fellow Yongfeng Lu of University of Nebraska, Lincoln (USA), and Guido Hennig of Daetwyler Graphics (Switzerland). Photonics West 2017, 28 January through 2 February at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, CA (USA), encompassed more than 4700 presentations on light-based technologies across more than 95 conferences. It was also the venue for dozens of technical courses for professional development, the Prism Awards for Photonics Innovation, the SPIE Startup Challenge, a two-day job fair, two major exhibitions, and a diverse business program with more than 25 events. SPIE Photonics West 2018 will run 27 January through 1 February at Moscone Center.


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: phys.org

The process of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) uses an electric field to drive colloidal particles suspended in a liquid from a solution onto a conductive substrate. Commonly used to apply paint to cars, EPD also is utilized to coat ceramics, metals and polymers with a range of materials and for 3-D printing objects. Developed using a particle dynamics framework and run on the Vulcan supercomputing system at LLNL, the newly published model tracks every single particle during the entire EPD process—each particle is about 200 nanometers wide, roughly the diameter of the smallest bacteria. The research is published in the Dec. 20 issue of the journal Langmuir . "This gives us more information than any model before and fresh insights that were previously inaccessible," said the study's LLNL postdoctoral researcher Brian Giera. "Within this particle dynamics framework we were able to get really detailed information. In terms of understanding the EPD process in detail, this is a first-of-its kind." Over a period of two years, the team, led by principal investigator Todd Weisgraber, a researcher from LLNL's Materials Engineering Division, developed the model and ran several dozens of different simulations, changing the strength of the electrical field and the concentration of salt in the system. Not only does the strength of the electrical field affect the development of crystals, Giera said, but salt concentration, surprisingly, also plays a key role. Giera said the model could be used to better understand deposition kinetics, determine how fast to build and anticipate resulting crystallinity, which could impact how armor is produced, and how coatings are applied using the EPD process. "The model is poised to take on a lot of questions," Giera said. "It gives us more predictive information to optimize the system." Luis Zepeda-Ruiz, a scientist in the Lab's Materials Science Division, built the initial model containing all the essential mechanisms before Giera took over the work. He said the model can be augmented to allow for virtually any type of material, extending the science to a broad range of applications. "Our computational model can access details that are extremely difficult to observe in real experiments," Zepeda-Ruiz said. "It also can be used when experiments fail to reproduce results, when the solution ages and changes its chemistry. Now we have a pure, reproducible means for doing EPD, and that's a benefit." The model has been so well received by the scientific community that it was selected to be presented in a keynote speech by Giera at the international Electrophoretic Deposition Conferences Series held in South Korea in October. LLNL researcher Andy Pascall, an expert in EPD, helped define the model's initial parameter choices and is working on validating it for future implementation. Pascall said the model will be particularly useful to the field of photonics science, which requires precise control over crystallization. "Photonic crystallization is interesting to the scientific community in general. The way this has been done before in the lab has been through trial and error," Pascall said. "It's fair to say this is the only particle-based EPD model out there. Having a model that can be predictive allows you to run hundreds of virtual experiments that would take us months to do in the lab." Next, Giera will study how the colloidal particles re-suspend and, more importantly, tailor the model to account for particles of different sizes. Explore further: Theoretical model reveals how droplets grow around tiny particles on a surface More information: Brian Giera et al. Mesoscale Particle-Based Model of Electrophoretic Deposition, Langmuir (2017). DOI: 10.1021/acs.langmuir.6b04010

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