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News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: onlinelibrary.wiley.com

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— The Global 3D Food Printing Market Research Report 2017 is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the 3D Food Printing Market. This report studies 3D Food Printing in Global market, especially North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India. focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with capacity, production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer covering top manufacturers in global market, with capacity, production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering 3D Systems, TNO, Natural Machines, Choc Edge, Systems and Materials Research Corporation, Byflow, Print2taste GmbH, Barilla, Candyfab and Beehex. Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Regions, with sales (consumption), revenue, market share and growth rate of 3D Food Printing in these regions, from 2017 to 2022 (forecast), like North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India. Firstly, 3D Food Printing Market On the basis of product, this report displays the production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type, primarily split into Dough, Fruits and Vegetables, Proteins, Sauces, Dairy Products and Carbohydrates. On the basis on the end users/applications, this report focuses on the status and outlook for major applications/end users, consumption (sales) , market share and growth rate of 3D Food Printing for each application, including Government, Commercial and Residential View more details about this report @ http://www.reportsweb.com/global-3d-food-printing-market-research-report-2017 Few points from Table of Contents 5 Global 3D Food Printing Production, Revenue (Value) , Price Trend by Type 5.1 Global 3D Food Printing Production and Market Share by Type (2011-2016) 5.2 Global 3D Food Printing Revenue and Market Share by Type (2011-2016) 5.3 Global 3D Food Printing Price by Type (2011-2016) 5.4 Global 3D Food Printing Production Growth by Type (2011-2016) 6 Global 3D Food Printing Market Analysis by Application 6.1 Global 3D Food Printing Consumption and Market Share by Application (2011-2016) 6.2 Global 3D Food Printing Consumption Growth Rate by Application (2011-2016) 6.3 Market Drivers and Opportunities 6.3.1 Potential Applications 6.3.2 Emerging Markets/Countries 7 Global 3D Food Printing Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis 7.1 3D Systems 7.1.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.1.2 3D Food Printing Product Category, Application and Specification 7.1.2.1 Product A 7.1.2.2 Product B 7.1.3 3D Systems 3D Food Printing Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.1.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.2 TNO 7.2.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.2.2 3D Food Printing Product Category, Application and Specification 7.2.2.1 Product A 7.2.2.2 Product B 7.2.3 TNO 3D Food Printing Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.2.4 Main Business/Business Overview 7.3 Natural Machines 7.3.1 Company Basic Information, Manufacturing Base, Sales Area and Its Competitors 7.3.2 3D Food Printing Product Category, Application and Specification 7.3.2.1 Product A 7.3.2.2 Product B 7.3.3 Natural Machines 3D Food Printing Capacity, Production, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2012-2017) 7.3.4 Main Business/Business Overview For more information, please visit http://www.reportsweb.com/global-3d-food-printing-market-research-report-2017


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

Since the discovery two decades ago of the unconventional topological superconductor Sr RuO , scientists have extensively investigated its properties at temperatures below its 1 K critical temperature (Tc), at which a phase transition from a metal to a superconducting state occurs. Now experiments done at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the Madhavan and Abbamonte laboratories, in collaboration with researchers at six institutions in the U.S., Canada, United Kingdom, and Japan, have shed new light on the electronic properties of this material at temperatures 4 K above Tc. The team’s findings may elucidate yet-unresolved questions about Sr2RuO4’s emergent properties in the superconducting state. Vidya Madhavan, a physics professor and member of the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Lab at the U. of I., led the experiment. She explains, “We began from the widely held assumption that, in Sr2RO4’s normal metallic state above its Tc, the interactions of electrons would be sufficiently weak, so that the spectrum of excitations or electronic states would be well defined.” Madhavan continues, “However, and this is a big surprise, our team observed large interaction effects in the normal metallic state. Electrons in metals have well defined momentum and energy. In simple metals, at low temperatures the electrons occupy all momentum states in a region bounded by a ‘Fermi surface.’ Here we found that the velocity of electrons in some directions across the Fermi surface were reduced by about 50 percent, which is not expected. We saw similar interaction effects in the tunneling density of the states. This is a significant reduction, and it was a great surprise. We thought we would just find the shape of the Fermi surface, but instead, we get these anomalies.” Eduardo Fradkin, a physics professor and the director of the Institute for Condensed Matter Theory at the U. of I., comments, “The basic electronic properties of this material have been known for some time. Scientists study this material because it’s supposed to be a simple system for testing scientific effects. But the material has also been a source of ongoing debate in the field: this is a p-wave superconductor, with spin-triplet pairing. This has suggested that the superconducting state may be topological in nature. Understanding how this system becomes superconducting is an open and intriguing question.” The breakthrough to understanding the puzzling properties of the material’s superconducting state may lie in this anomalous normal (non-superconducting) state. In a conventional normal metallic state at low temperature, the electronic states behave as well defined quasi-particles, as described by the Landau-Fermi liquid theory. But the researchers found anomalies in the particle interactions at 5 K that actually characterize Sr RuO as a “strongly correlated metal.” In the experiment, Madhavan’s team passed electrons into the material using an electronic metallic tip, then measured the resultant current using two highly advanced and complementary techniques, Fourier transform scanning tunneling spectroscopy and momentum resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy. In four data runs, the scientists found a significant change in the probability of the electron tunneling near zero energy, as compared with Fermi-liquids. “We were surprised to see so much rich information,” shares Madhavan. “We started talking to Eduardo about the theory and to Peter Abbamonte about his experiments. Abbamonte’s group, applying the technique of momentum resolved electron energy loss spectroscopy, also finds interactions with collective modes at the same energies.” “The open question now, we found something interesting at 4 K above the superconducting phase transition. What significance does this have to what’s happening below the superconducting temperature?” Madhavan continues. The team plans to delve into that question next: “When Vidya goes to the superconducting state, we will know more,” Fradkin affirms. “These findings will enable her to take a unique approach to revealing the superconducting order parameter of this material in upcoming experiments.” Advance online publication of these results appeared May 8 in Nature Physics.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

The process that makes gold-plated jewelry or chrome car accents is now making powerful lithium-ion batteries. Researchers at the University of Illinois, Xerion Advanced Battery Corporation and Nanjing University in China developed a method for electroplating lithium-ion battery cathodes, yielding high-quality, high-performance battery materials that could also open the door to flexible and solid-state batteries. "This is an entirely new approach to manufacturing battery cathodes, which resulted in batteries with previously unobtainable forms and functionalities," said Paul V. Braun, a professor of materials science and engineering and director of the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Lab at Illinois. He co-led the research group that published its findings in the journal Science Advances. Traditional lithium-ion battery cathodes use lithium-containing powders formed at high temperatures. The powder is mixed with gluelike binders and other additives into a slurry, which is spread on a thin sheet of aluminum foil and dried. The slurry layer needs to be thin, so the batteries are limited in how much energy they can store. The glue also limits performance. "The glue is not active. It doesn't contribute anything to the battery, and it gets in the way of electricity flowing in the battery," said co-author Hailong Ning, the director of research and development at Xerion Advanced Battery Corporation in Champaign, a startup company co-founded by Braun. "You have all this inactive material taking up space inside the battery, while the whole world is trying to get more energy and power from the battery." The researchers bypassed the powder and glue process altogether by directly electroplating the lithium materials onto the aluminum foil. Since the electroplated cathode doesn't have any glue taking up space, it packs in 30 percent more energy than a conventional cathode, according to the paper. It can charge and discharge faster as well, since the current can pass directly through it and not have to navigate around the inactive glue or through the slurry's porous structure. It also has the advantage of being more stable. Additionally, the electroplating process creates pure cathode materials, even from impure starting ingredients. This means that manufacturers can use materials lower in cost and quality and the end product will still be high in performance, eliminating the need to start with expensive materials already brought up to battery grade, Braun said. "This method opens the door to flexible and three-dimensional battery cathodes, since electroplating involves dipping the substrate in a liquid bath to coat it," said co-author Huigang Zhang, a former senior scientist at Xerion who is now a professor at Nanjing University. The researchers demonstrated the technique on carbon foam, a lightweight, inexpensive material, making cathodes that were much thicker than conventional slurries. They also demonstrated it on foils and surfaces with different textures, shapes and flexibility. "These designs are impossible to achieve by conventional processes," Braun said. "But what's really important is that it's a high-performance material and that it's nearly solid. By using a solid electrode rather than a porous one, you can store more energy in a given volume. At the end of the day, people want batteries to store a lot of energy."


Control of light-matter interaction is central to fundamental phenomena and technologies such as photosynthesis, lasers, LEDs and solar cells. City College of New York researchers have now demonstrated a new class of artificial media called photonic hypercrystals that can control light-matter interaction in unprecedented ways. This could lead to such benefits as ultrafast LEDs for Li-Fi (a wireless technology that transmits high-speed data using visible light communication), enhanced absorption in solar cells and the development of single photon emitters for quantum information processing, said Vinod M. Menon, professor of physics in City College's Division of Science who led the research. Photonic crystals and metamaterials are two of the most well-known artificial materials used to manipulate light. However, they suffer from drawbacks such as bandwidth limitation and poor light emission. In their research, Menon and his team overcame these drawbacks by developing hypercrystals that take on the best of both photonic crystals and metamaterials and do even better. They demonstrated significant increase in both light emission rate and intensity from nanomaterials embedded inside the hypercrystals. The emergent properties of the hypercrystals arise from the unique combination of length scales of the features in the hypercrystal as well as the inherent properties of the nanoscale structures. The CCNY research appears in the latest issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The team included graduate students Tal Galfsky and Jie Gu from Menon's research group in CCNY's Physics Department and Evgenii Narimanov (Purdue University), who first theoretically predicted the hypercrystals. The research was supported by the Army Research Office, the National Science Foundation - Division of Materials Research MRSEC program, and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.


Abstract: Control of light-matter interaction is central to fundamental phenomena and technologies such as photosynthesis, lasers, LEDs and solar cells. City College of New York researchers have now demonstrated a new class of artificial media called photonic hypercrystals that can control light-matter interaction in unprecedented ways. New York, NY | Posted on May 5th, 2017 This could lead to such benefits as ultrafast LEDs for Li-Fi (a wireless technology that transmits high-speed data using visible light communication), enhanced absorption in solar cells and the development of single photon emitters for quantum information processing, said Vinod M. Menon, professor of physics in City College's Division of Science who led the research. Photonic crystals and metamaterials are two of the most well-known artificial materials used to manipulate light. However, they suffer from drawbacks such as bandwidth limitation and poor light emission. In their research, Menon and his team overcame these drawbacks by developing hypercrystals that take on the best of both photonic crystals and metamaterials and do even better. They demonstrated significant increase in both light emission rate and intensity from nanomaterials embedded inside the hypercrystals. The emergent properties of the hypercrystals arise from the unique combination of length scales of the features in the hypercrystal as well as the inherent properties of the nanoscale structures. The CCNY research appears in the latest issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The team included graduate students Tal Galfsky and Jie Gu from Menon's research group in CCNY's Physics Department and Evgenii Narimanov (Purdue University), who first theoretically predicted the hypercrystals. The research was supported by the Army Research Office, the National Science Foundation - Division of Materials Research MRSEC program, and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.materialstoday.com

This is a schematic of an interpocket paired state, one of two topological superconducting states proposed in the latest work from the lab of Eun-Ah Kim, associate professor of physics at Cornell University. The material used is a monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide. Image: Eun-Ah Kim, Cornell University.The experimental realization of ultrathin graphene has ushered in a new age in materials research. What started with graphene has now evolved to encompass numerous related single-atom-thick materials, which have unusual properties due to their ultra-thinness. Among these materials are transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), which offer several key features not available in graphene and are emerging as next-generation semiconductors. Now, new research shows that TMDs could even realize topological superconductivity and thus provide a platform for quantum computing – the ultimate goal of a research group at Cornell University led by Eun-Ah Kim, associate professor of physics. "Our proposal is very realistic – that's why it's exciting," Kim said of her group's research. "We have a theoretical strategy to materialize a topological superconductor ... and that will be a step toward building a quantum computer. The history of superconductivity over the last 100 years has been led by accidental discoveries. We have a proposal that's sitting on firm principles. "Instead of hoping for a new material that has the properties you want, let's go after it with insight and design principle." Yi-Ting Hsu, a doctoral student in Kim’s group, is lead author of a new paper on this research in Nature Communications. Other team members include Kim group alumni Mark Fischer, now at ETH Zurich in Switzerland, and Abolhassan Vaezi, now at Stanford University. The group propose that TMDs' unusual properties favor two topological superconducting states, which if experimentally confirmed will open up possibilities for manipulating topological superconductors at temperatures near absolute zero. Kim identified hole-doped (positive charge-enhanced) single-layer TMDs as a promising candidate for topological superconductivity. She did this based on the known special locking between spin state and the kinetic energy of electrons (spin-valley locking) of single-layer TMDs, as well as the recent observations of superconductivity in electron-doped (negative charge-enhanced) single-layer TMDs. The group's goal is a superconductor that operates at around 1K (approximately -457°F), which could be sufficiently cooled with liquid helium to maintain quantum computing potential in a superconducting state. Theoretically, housing a quantum computer powerful enough to justify the power needed to keep the superconductor at 1K is not out of the question, Kim said. In fact, IBM already has a 7-qubit (quantum bit) computer that operates at less than 1K, which is available to the public through its IBM Quantum Experience. A quantum computer with approximately six times more qubits would fundamentally change computing, Kim said. "If you get to 40 qubits, that computing power will exceed any classical computers out there," she said. "And to house a 40-qubit quantum computer in cryogenic temperature is not that big a deal. It will be a revolution." Kim and her group are working with Debdeep Jena and Grace Xing of electrical and computer engineering, and Katja Nowack of physics, through an interdisciplinary research group seed grant from the Cornell Center for Materials Research (CCMR). Each group brings researchers from different departments together, with support from both the university and the US National Science Foundation's Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers program. "We're combining the engineering expertise of DJ and Grace, and expertise Katja has in mesoscopic systems and superconductors," Kim said. "It requires different expertise to come together to pursue this, and CCMR allows that." This story is adapted from material from Cornell University, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. Link to original source.


Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics. "The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including biological and structural health monitoring sensors," explained Sameh Tawfick, an assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering at Illinois. "Aligned carbon nanotube sheets are suitable for a wide range of application spanning the micro- to the macro-scales including Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), supercapacitor electrodes, electrical cables, artificial muscles, and multi-functional composites. "To our knowledge, this is the first study to apply the principles of fracture mechanics to design and study the toughness nano-architectured CNT textiles. The theoretical framework of fracture mechanics is shown to be very robust for a variety of linear and non-linear materials." Carbon nanotubes, which have been around since the early nineties, have been hailed as a "wonder material" for numerous nanotechnology applications, and rightly so. These tiny cylindrical structures made from wrapped graphene sheets have diameter of a few nanometers--about 1000 times thinner than a human hair, yet, a single carbon nanotube is stronger than steel and carbon fibers, more conductive than copper, and lighter than aluminum. However, it has proven really difficult to construct materials, such as fabrics or films that demonstrate these properties on centimeter or meter scales. The challenge stems from the difficulty of assembling and weaving CNTs since they are so small, and their geometry is very hard to control. "The study of the fracture energy of CNT textiles led us to design these extremely tough films," stated Yue Liang, a former graduate student with the Kinetic Materials Research group and lead author of the paper, "Tough Nano-Architectured Conductive Textile Made by Capillary Splicing of Carbon Nanotubes," appearing in Advanced Engineering Materials. To our knowledge, this is the first study of the fracture energy of CNT textiles. Beginning with catalyst deposited on a silicon oxide substrate, vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were synthesized via chemical vapor deposition in the form of parallel lines of 5?μm width, 10?μm length, and 20-60?μm heights. "The staggered catalyst pattern is inspired by the brick and mortar design motif commonly seen in tough natural materials such as bone, nacre, the glass sea sponge, and bamboo," Liang added. "Looking for ways to staple the CNTs together, we were inspired by the splicing process developed by ancient Egyptians 5,000 years ago to make linen textiles. We tried several mechanical approaches including micro-rolling and simple mechanical compression to simultaneously re-orient the nanotubes, then, finally, we used the self-driven capillary forces to staple the CNTs together." "This work combines careful synthesis, and delicate experimentation and modeling," Tawfick said. "Flexible electronics are subject to repeated bending and stretching, which could cause their mechanical failure. This new CNT textile, with simple flexible encapsulation in an elastomer matrix, can be used in smart textiles, smart skins, and a variety of flexible electronics. Owing to their extremely high toughness, they represent an attractive material, which can replace thin metal films to enhance device reliability." In addition to Liang and Tawfick, co-authors include David Sias and Ping Ju Chen.


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics. "The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including biological and structural health monitoring sensors," explained Sameh Tawfick, an assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering at Illinois. "Aligned carbon nanotube sheets are suitable for a wide range of application spanning the micro- to the macro-scales including Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), supercapacitor electrodes, electrical cables, artificial muscles, and multi-functional composites. "To our knowledge, this is the first study to apply the principles of fracture mechanics to design and study the toughness nano-architectured CNT textiles. The theoretical framework of fracture mechanics is shown to be very robust for a variety of linear and non-linear materials." Carbon nanotubes, which have been around since the early nineties, have been hailed as a "wonder material" for numerous nanotechnology applications, and rightly so. These tiny cylindrical structures made from wrapped graphene sheets have diameter of a few nanometers--about 1000 times thinner than a human hair, yet, a single carbon nanotube is stronger than steel and carbon fibers, more conductive than copper, and lighter than aluminum. However, it has proven really difficult to construct materials, such as fabrics or films that demonstrate these properties on centimeter or meter scales. The challenge stems from the difficulty of assembling and weaving CNTs since they are so small, and their geometry is very hard to control. "The study of the fracture energy of CNT textiles led us to design these extremely tough films," stated Yue Liang, a former graduate student with the Kinetic Materials Research group and lead author of the paper, "Tough Nano-Architectured Conductive Textile Made by Capillary Splicing of Carbon Nanotubes," appearing in Advanced Engineering Materials. To our knowledge, this is the first study of the fracture energy of CNT textiles. Beginning with catalyst deposited on a silicon oxide substrate, vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were synthesized via chemical vapor deposition in the form of parallel lines of 5?μm width, 10?μm length, and 20-60?μm heights. "The staggered catalyst pattern is inspired by the brick and mortar design motif commonly seen in tough natural materials such as bone, nacre, the glass sea sponge, and bamboo," Liang added. "Looking for ways to staple the CNTs together, we were inspired by the splicing process developed by ancient Egyptians 5,000 years ago to make linen textiles. We tried several mechanical approaches including micro-rolling and simple mechanical compression to simultaneously re-orient the nanotubes, then, finally, we used the self-driven capillary forces to staple the CNTs together." "This work combines careful synthesis, and delicate experimentation and modeling," Tawfick said. "Flexible electronics are subject to repeated bending and stretching, which could cause their mechanical failure. This new CNT textile, with simple flexible encapsulation in an elastomer matrix, can be used in smart textiles, smart skins, and a variety of flexible electronics. Owing to their extremely high toughness, they represent an attractive material, which can replace thin metal films to enhance device reliability."


Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles, that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics. “The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including biological and structural health monitoring sensors,” explained Sameh Tawfick, an assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering at Illinois. “Aligned carbon nanotube sheets are suitable for a wide range of application spanning the micro- to the macro-scales including Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), supercapacitor electrodes, electrical cables, artificial muscles, and multi-functional composites. “To our knowledge, this is the first study to apply the principles of fracture mechanics to design and study the toughness nano-architectured CNT textiles. The theoretical framework of fracture mechanics is shown to be very robust for a variety of linear and non-linear materials.” Carbon nanotubes, which have been around since the early nineties, have been hailed as a “wonder material” for numerous nanotechnology applications, and rightly so. These tiny cylindrical structures made from wrapped graphene sheets have diameter of a few nanometers—about 1000 times thinner than a human hair, yet, a single carbon nanotube is stronger than steel and carbon fibers, more conductive than copper, and lighter than aluminum. However, it has proven really difficult to construct materials, such as fabrics or films that demonstrate these properties on centimeter or meter scales. The challenge stems from the difficulty of assembling and weaving CNTs since they are so small, and their geometry is very hard to control. “The study of the fracture energy of CNT textiles led us to design these extremely tough films,” stated Yue Liang, a former graduate student with the Kinetic Materials Research group and lead author of the paper, “Tough Nano-Architectured Conductive Textile Made by Capillary Splicing of Carbon Nanotubes,” appearing in Advanced Engineering Materials. To our knowledge, this is the first study of the fracture energy of CNT textiles. Beginning with catalyst deposited on a silicon oxide substrate, vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were synthesized via chemical vapor deposition in the form of parallel lines of 5 µm width, 10 μm length, and 20–60 μm heights. “The staggered catalyst pattern is inspired by the brick and mortar design motif commonly seen in tough natural materials such as bone, nacre, the glass sea sponge, and bamboo,” Liang added. “Looking for ways to staple the CNTs together, we were inspired by the splicing process developed by ancient Egyptians 5,000 years ago to make linen textiles. We tried several mechanical approaches including micro-rolling and simple mechanical compression to simultaneously re-orient the nanotubes, then, finally, we used the self-driven capillary forces to staple the CNTs together.” “This work combines careful synthesis, and delicate experimentation and modeling,” Tawfick said. “Flexible electronics are subject to repeated bending and stretching, which could cause their mechanical failure. This new CNT textile, with simple flexible encapsulation in an elastomer matrix, can be used in smart textiles, smart skins, and a variety of flexible electronics. Owing to their extremely high toughness, they represent an attractive material, which can replace thin metal films to enhance device reliability.” In addition to Liang and Tawfick, co-authors include David Sias and Ping Ju Chen.

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