Fairfax, VA, United States

Materials Modification, Inc.

www.matmod.com
Fairfax, VA, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Patent
Materials Modification, Inc. | Date: 2014-03-14

Disclosure of functionalized ionic liquids. Use of disclosed ionic liquids as solvent for carbon dioxide. Use of disclosed ionic liquids as flame retardant. Use of disclosed ionic liquids for coating fabric to obtain flame retardant fabric.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2014

ABSTRACT: In this Phase I, MMI proposes an innovative technology using a combination of Acousto-Ultrasonics diagnostics and piezoelectric transducers to detect corrosion in advance. The electro-mechanical coupling allows direct interface with electronics used for sensing or actuation purposes. Using Acousto-Ultrasonics and in-situ piezoelectric transducers, atmospheric corrosion on a aluminum alloys and galvanic couples can be easily monitored. This approach will provide earlier detection to difficult-to-access areas in the aircrafts and improved ease of repair procedures or capability. For removal and cleaning of corrosion of galvanic couples, MMI will use innovative approaches to develop self-cleaning and healing anti-corrosion coatings for aluminum components and aircraft parts. The trigger-and-release approach from the nano-capsules present in the coating will be beneficial for optimized amount of materials released, hence will not increase the weight of the aircraft component. Characteristic features of the technology include: Transducer based guided wave diagnostics for early detection of corrosion Nanomaterial-based low VOC cleaning and anti-corrosion coatings New technology based on trigger-and-release self-cleaning and healing mechanism Coating can withstand harsh conditions (salinity, temperature, chemicals, 3 & #61603; pH & #61603; 14) Easy detection and application on site and not labor-intensive process BENEFIT: Early detection of corrosion in and around difficult-to-access zones in aircraft structures is essential to resist corrosion on galvanic and aluminum alloys. The worldwide cost of corrosion has been estimated to be nearly $300 billion per year. A quick, easy and precise identification system that can detect corrosion in advance has a great potential to eradicate corrosion for advanced engineering systems. The detection technology and remedy using the coating systems developed in this effort will provide solutions to structural (bridges, bunkers), automotive (cars), aviation and warfare applications in the US defense and military sectors. The anticipated benefits can be propelled for civilian and construction purposes.


A composition for in situ formation and/or expansion of a polymer-based hemostatic agent to control bleeding includes a suitable amount of a polymer or polymer-forming component, hydrogen peroxide or chemical(s) capable of forming hydrogen peroxide, or a combination of both, and a decomposing agent for hydrogen peroxide. The decomposing agent includes an endogenously or exogenously supplied catalyst (other than catalase), or both, and/or the polymer or polymer-forming component.


Patent
Materials Modification, Inc. | Date: 2014-03-13

Clay composite sheets, mats, films or membranes without polymers. Methods of preparing clay composite sheets, mats, films or membranes without using polymers in the method. Methods of using clay composite sheets, mats, films or membranes prepared without using polymers. Antimicrobial dressing having organo-modified clay product. Transdermal delivery of drugs using organo-modified clay product and methods.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2016

Current aircraft utilize electro-thermal/mechanical protection systems to actively remove ice from vital aircraft surfaces. These systems have high power requirements and only protect certain areas of the aircraft; thus such technology is not considered for next generation vehicles as it will greatly diminish the allocation of power for other vital components. The accumulation of ice on an aircraft (airframe or engine components) results in a drastic decrease of performance (decrease in thrust and lift, increase in weight and drag). To this effect, Materials Modification, Inc. (MMI), proposes to develop a thin-film coating that will combat dynamic icing conditions with a two-part solution; in which the top layer coating consists of a smooth superhydrophobic coating to combat the supercooled water droplets and a base layer that consists of a smooth silicone elastomer to reduce ice adhesion strength from possible ice nucleation. Phase I efforts will be primarily dedicated towards developing and synthesizing the hybrid thin-film coating and evaluating its ice adhesion strength, coating durability, and surface morphology. Phase II efforts will build upon the results of the Phase I findings and incorporate the material/coating into NASA?s constructed vehicles such as UAVs, manned aircrafts, and next generation aerial vehicles (N+2).


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2015

Polymer reinforced composite parts required for heavy lift launch vehicles are currently fabricated by hand lay-up or automated tape lay-up followed by curing using heat, pressure, vacuum and inert atmosphere. Composite structures for future applications are expected to be larger than 9 meters in diameter and greater than 10 meters in length. Such large composite structures cannot be fabricated by regular autoclaving processes because of limitations of the size of autoclaves and high costs associated with energy consumption. In this Phase I effort, MMI will develop a novel out-of-autoclave processing method for the fabrication of nanostructured polymer matrix composites for fabrication of light weight structural parts of large dimensions. This phase of research will also involve a system analysis of the technology to identify the benefits and target areas of use. A correlation study based system analyses will provide a path to apply the fabrication methods to fabricate large composite parts used in aircraft structures. Phase II will scale up the technology and demonstrate property enhancements. The resin infusion process proposed will be suitable for economical manufacture of large parts. The nanocomposite reinforcement proposed will also afford better mechanical properties to the polymer matrix composite.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 120.00K | Year: 2015

In the crew compartment of a spacecraft, dust that is self-generated or from other activities pose a respiratory irritant, especially within a small, confined space. Therefore air cabin filtration technologies should be improved for future spacecrafts to efficiently remove the range of particulate matter sizes (nano to micron size). It is also desirable to have the new particulate air filters that can be efficiently remove volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) and self-regenerated. This will reduce the logistics burden of carrying additional replacement filters on-board. In the proposed Phase I effort, smart fibrous filters with both particle and VOC removal capacities will be developed. The new particulate filters will be much more efficient than the current HEPA filters and also capable of self-regenerating. The Phase I effort will focus on demonstration of the 'proof of concept' that fibrous filters can filter and remove the ultrafine (


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 500.61K | Year: 2015

"US Armys combat uniform systems currently use NyCo fabrics which are made using a 50% nylon/50% cotton blend. Army Combat Utility (ACU) uniforms have excellent comfort and durability but lack flame resistance (FR). The US Army relies on expensive FR fabrics for protecting warfighters against fire hazards. These FR fabrics are typically made using specialty fibers such as Lenzing FR rayon fibers and have to be imported into the US. Instead of using these expensive fabrics, it will be economical to impart FR property on the NyCo fabric by treating them with flame resistant materials/coatings. In the Phase I effort, Materials Modification Inc. (MMI) has investigated a family of ionic liquids as FR materials for NyCo fabrics. Selective ionic liquids exhibited excellent FR properties. These ionic liquids are non-flammable, high temperature stable (>250C), non-volatile liquids, non-toxic to humans, and are also amenable to coating on textile fabrics. Unlike conventional FR chemicals, ionic liquids are colorless and do not interfere with the other properties of the military fabrics such as camouflage, air permeability and flexibility. Along with the flame resistant property these ionic liquids also exhibited antistatic properties demonstrating the potential multi-functional capabilities. In the Phase II effort, the FR coatings downselected from the Phase I effort will be optimized for superior performance on NyCo fabrics. The scale up production of FR ionic liquids will be demonstrated. A roll-to-roll dip and padding production process will be used to produce several yards of coated fabrics (500 yards). The coated fabrics will be tested for reproducible performance of flame retardancy, antistatic properties and launderability in collaboration with our academic and industrial partners. The optimized FR treated NyCo fabrics will be assembled into a prototype Flame Resistant Army Combat Uniform (FR-ACU) for the evaluation by the US Army at the Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center. "


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2016

NASA energy storage requirements for extended human and robotic missions to space require energy generating systems with high specific energy, high volumetric efficiency, greater reliability, reduced parasitic impedance, and low cost/ease of manufacture. Current lithium ion batteries cannot meet the energy requirements of these missions. Lithium-air batteries, where lithium directly reacts with air can potentially have specific energy in the range of in the order 5.2 X 103 Wh kg−1. Realizing such high performance metrics however requires significant advances in component design. The electrolyte to be used in lithium air batteries, for example, must be compatible with lithium metal, and have high ionic conductivity in the order of 10-3 Siemens/cm to achieve the promised performance metrics. MMI proposes a novel aerogel-supported ionic liquid electrolyte with very high ionic conductivity for use as electrolyte in high performance lithium air batteries. With ionic conductance in the range of milli-Siemens/cm, this electrolyte, when combined with appropriate electrodes can potentially be used to fabricate lithium air batteries with specific energies as high as 500 Wh/kg and volumetric energy densities in the order of 700 Wh/L.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2016

Trash bags from the International Space Station (ISS) are currently stored on-board until they are returned to earth for disposal. Alternate methods are seriously being considered for long duration missions such as travel to Moon and Mars. NASA Exploration Life Support system is currently developing an Heat Melt Compactor (HMC) for waste management for long duration missions. Using HMC, trash can be compacted into disks instead of allowing the trash-filled containers to occupy valuable space in the spacecraft. Such compacted trash can potentially be useful as radiation shields. In order to assist the HMC process, MMI will develop a multipurpose trash bag that will be capable of storing waste generated during travel in space. The waste bag will allow water vapor to pass through during hot melt compactor processing. The bag will also enable encapsulation of the compacted product and will be amenable for sterile storage. In the Phase I effort, waste container bags will be tested for containment of simulated trash typically used on a space mission. The waste container bag material will be tested for removal of water from the bag during the hot melt compaction process. After removal of water, the dehydrated solid compacts will be tested for the prevention of harmful microbial growth. In the Phase II effort, the waste bag material design and volume will be optimized to fit the NASA's hot melt compactor systems that will be used in long duration travels in space.

Loading Materials Modification, Inc. collaborators
Loading Materials Modification, Inc. collaborators