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News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

WEST CHESTER, OH--(Marketwired - May 15, 2017) - AK Steel ( : AKS) said today that one of the company's employees and five co-authors in association with Purdue University Northwest's Center for Innovation Through Visualization and Simulation (CIVS) received the Association for Iron & Steel Technology's (AIST) Hunt-Kelly Outstanding Paper Award - First Place. Stuart J. Street, AK Steel Technical Manager and co-authors received the award for their paper "Investigation of Co-Injection of Natural Gas and Pulverized Coal in a Blast Furnace." The paper investigated a new concept for blast furnace operations that has the potential to increase efficiency and productivity, while reducing operating costs. "I'm proud to congratulate Stuart for this honor from AIST," said Roger K. Newport, Chief Executive Officer of AK Steel. "This work reflects the company's continued focus on innovation, including steel manufacturing processes that enhance our operating efficiency to position us to serve the needs of our customers today and for the future." The Hunt-Kelly Outstanding Paper Award - First Place is the highest award given by AIST to a technical paper for excellence, originality, relevance to the technology of the iron and steel industry, and for the advancement of engineering and operating practice in the steel industry. The authors were nominated for this award as the recipients of the 2016 Josef S. Kapitan Award - Ironmaking from AIST, and also won recognition from AIST for a follow-up study. Dr. Street joined AK Steel in 2001 as a Senior Metallurgical Process Engineer in the Dearborn Works (Michigan) primary operations. He has held technical roles supporting the Dearborn Works Blast Furnace including the Blast Furnace Reline Project and as a Continuous Improvement Manager. Dr. Street holds a Bachelor of Engineering, Masters of Engineering and a PhD, each in Materials Engineering, from the University of Wollongong, Australia. CIVS AK Steel is a member of the Steel Manufacturing Simulation and Visualization Consortium, which is operated by CIVS. Further information about CIVS is available at https://centers.pnw.edu/civs/. AK Steel AK Steel is a leading producer of flat-rolled carbon, stainless and electrical steel products, and carbon and stainless tubular products, primarily for automotive, infrastructure and manufacturing, electrical power generation and distribution markets. Headquartered in West Chester, Ohio (Greater Cincinnati), the company employs approximately 8,500 men and women at eight steel plants, two coke plants and two tube manufacturing plants across six states (Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia) and one tube plant in Mexico. Additional information about AK Steel is available at www.aksteel.com.


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Who hasn't lived through the frustrating experience of being without a phone after forgetting to recharge it? This could one day be a thing of the past thanks to technology being developed by Hydro-Québec and McGill University. Lithium-ion batteries have allowed the rapid proliferation of all kinds of mobile devices such as phones, tablets and computers. These tools however require frequent re-charging because of the limited energy density of their batteries. "With smart phones now, you can basically carry your whole office in that device, they are loaded with all sorts of applications so you need a lot of power to use it everyday and sometimes, you don't have access to a plug to recharge," explains Professor George P. Demopoulos, chair of Mining and Materials Engineering at McGill University. This has led to the development of portable solar chargers but these hybrid devices are difficult to miniaturize due to their complex circuitry and packaging issues. To solve this problem, scientists at McGill University and the Hydro-Québec's research institute are working on a single device capable of harvesting and storing energy using light. In other words, a self-charging battery. A novel concept presented in a Nature Communications paper by Professor Demopoulos and researchers at Hydro-Québec paves the way to these so-called light-charged batteries. The study shows that a standard cathode from a lithium-ion battery can be "sensitized" to light by incorporating photo-harvesting dye molecules. "In other words," says Dr. Andrea Paolella, the study's lead author and researcher at Hydro-Québec, "our research team was able to simulate a charging process using light as a source of energy." Scientists will now have to build an anode, the storage component, which will close the device's circuit, allowing energy produced by the cathode described in Nature Communications to be transferred and stored. If they succeed, they will have built the world's first 100% self-charging lithium-ion battery. The research team is already working on phase two of this project, thanks to a $564,000 grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. "We have done half of the job," says Professor Demopoulos, co-senior author of the paper with Hydro-Québec's Dr. Karim Zaghib, a world leading expert on batteries. "We know that we can design the electrode that absorbs light. "This grant will give us the opportunity to bridge the gap and demonstrate that this new concept of a light-chargeable battery is possible." "I'm an optimist and I think we can get a fully working device," says Paolella, who is also a former post-doctoral student from McGill. "Theoretically speaking, our goal is to develop a new hybrid solar-battery system, but depending on the power it can generate when we miniaturize it, we can imagine applications for portable devices such as phones". "Hydro-Québec has a strong global position with regard to the development of innovative, high-performance and safe battery materials," says Karim Zaghib Director - Energy Storage and Conservation at IREQ, Hydro-Québec's research institute. While it may take a few years to complete the second phase of the project, Professor Demopoulos believes this "passive form of charging" could play an important role in portable devices of the future...


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Scientists have been researching luminous coloured quantum dots (QDs) since the 1980s. These nanocrystals are now part of our everyday lives: the electronics industry uses them in LCD televisions to enhance colour reproduction and image quality. Quantum dots are spherical nanocrystals made of a semiconductor material. When these crystals are excited by light, they glow green or red - depending on their size, which is typically between 2 and 10 nanometres. The spherical forms can be produced in a highly controlled manner. A few years ago, a new type of nanocrystal caught the attention of researchers more or less by chance: nanoplatelets. Like quantum dots, these two-dimensional structures are just a few nanometres in size, but have a more uniform flat, rectangular shape. They are extremely thin, often just the width of a few atomic layers, giving the platelets one of their most striking properties - their extremely pure colour. Until now the mechanism that explains how such platelets form has been a mystery. In collaboration with a US-based researcher, ETH professor David Norris and his team have now solved this mystery: "We now know that there's no magic involved in producing nanoplatelets, just science" stressed the Professor of Materials Engineering. In a study just published in the scientific journal Nature Materials, the researchers show how cadmium selenide nanoplatelets take on their particular flat shape. Researchers had previously assumed that this highly precise form required a type of template. Scientists suspected that a mixture of special compounds and solvents produced a template in which these flat nanocrystals then formed. However, Norris and his colleagues found no evidence that such shape templates had any role. On the contrary, they found that the platelets can grow through the simple melting of the raw substances cadmium carboxylate and selenium, without any solvent whatsoever. The team then took this knowledge and developed a theoretical model to simulate the growth of the platelets. Thanks to this model, the scientists show that a crystallised core occurs spontaneously with just a few cadmium and selenium atoms. This crystallised nucleus can dissolve again and reconfigure in a different form. However, once it has exceeded a critical size, it grows to form a platelet. For energy-related reasons, the flat crystal grows only on its narrow side, up to 1,000 times faster than on its flat side. Growth on the flat side is significantly slower because it would involve more poorly bonded atoms on the surface, requiring energy to stabilise them. Ultimately, the researchers also succeeded in confirming their model experimentally by creating pyrite (FeS2) nanoplatelets in the lab. They produced the platelets exactly according to the model prediction using iron and sulphur ions as base substances. "It's very interesting that we were able to produce these crystals for the first time with pyrite," says Norris. "That showed us that we can expand our research to other materials." Cadmium selenide is the most common semiconductor material used in the research of nanocrystals; however, it is highly toxic and thus unsuitable for everyday use. The researchers' goal is to produce nanoplatelets made from less toxic or non-toxic substances. At present, Norris can only speculate about the future potential of nanoplatelets. He says that they may be an interesting alternative to quantum dots as they offer several advantages; for example, they can generate colours such as green better and more brightly. They also transmit energy more efficiently, which makes them ideal for use in solar cells, and they would also be suitable for lasers. However, they have several disadvantages as well. Quantum dots, for example, allow infinitely variable colour through the formation of varying size crystals. Not so in the case of platelets: due to the stratification of the atomic layers, the colour can be changed only incrementally. Fortunately, this limitation can be mitigated with certain "tricks": by encapsulation of the platelets in another semiconductor, the wavelength of the light emitted can be tuned more precisely. Only time will tell whether this discovery will attract the interest of the display industry. Some companies currently use organic LED (OLED) technology, while others use quantum dots. How the technology will evolve is unclear. However, the ability to investigate a broad variety of nanoplatelet materials due to this work may provide the semiconductor nanocrystal approach with a new edge. Riedinger A, Ott FD, Mule A, Mazzotti S, Knüsel PN, Kress SJP, Prins F, Erwin SC, Norris DJ. An intrinsic growth instability in isotropic materials leads to quasi-two-dimensional nanoplatelets. Nature Materials, Published Online 3rd April 2017. DOI 10.1038/nmat4889


The development of the technology originated in the lab of Lia Stanciu, a professor of materials engineering at Purdue in 2009. The technology could eliminate the need for a second surgery to remove conventional hardware. "Currently, most implants use stainless steel and titanium alloys for strength. This can cause long-term change in the mechanics of the specific region and eventual long-term deterioration," Stanciu said. "Additionally medical operations that require an orthopedic implant must be followed-up with a second surgery to remove the implant or the accompanying hardware of the implant resulting in higher medical costs and an increased risk of complications." Co-inventors of the technology are Stanciu; Eric Nauman, a professor in Purdue's College of Engineering and director of the College of Engineering Honors Programs; Michael J Heiden, a PhD candidate; and Mahdi Dehestani, a graduate research assistant, both in Purdue's School of Materials Engineering. Nauman said the resorbable metal technology provides superior properties compared to conventional metals. "The implant has high porosity, which is empty space in the material, in which optimal vascular invasion can occur. This provides a way for cells to optimally absorb the material," he said. "Our technology is able to provide short-term fixation but eliminate the need for long-term hardware such as titanium or stainless steel that may require second surgeries to be retrieved," The orthopedic implant also uses manganese, which provides a better degradation rate, Stanciu added. "Current resorbable metals are made with magnesium; however, this provides many adverse side effects to the body and degrades very quickly," she said. "We decided to use manganese instead of magnesium. Through studies we found that we can control the degradation rates from 22 millimeters per year to 1.2 millimeters per year pretty consistently. We also saw that manganese has a very good corrosion rate over time." Nauman said the technology still exhibits the usual benefits associated with using biomaterials. "With this technology we are able to tailor the surfaces such as de-alloying the surface to provide a better material for cells to grab on to and grow," he said. "We were also able to show that we could control cell attachment proliferation, an increase of the number of cells. Our technology still has all these usual benefits in addition to controlling the degradation rates of the metals." Explore further: Magnesium surgical implants can be designed to biodegrade, promote bone growth


West Lafayette, IN, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- A Purdue-based startup is developing a disruptive nanotherapeutic platform that could induce conversion of bad fat to good fat in an effort to provide a safe and effective way to treat obesity and diabetes. Meng Deng, an assistant professor in Purdue’s Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, and School of Materials Engineering founded Adipo Therapeutics LLC to further develop, test and commercialize the technology. Shihuan Kuang, Purdue professor of animal sciences is also involved in the development of the technology.  Deng said obesity is a nationwide epidemic in dire need of a safe and effective solution.             “More than one-third of adults in the U.S. are affected by obesity, which results from the lack of balance between energy intake and energy expenditure,” he said. “There are approved anti-obesity drugs on the market that focus on decreasing energy intake by either suppressing appetite or reducing lipid absorption, but they have only produced limited success and are usually accompanied with unpleasant side effects.”             Adipo Therapeutics integrates two platform technologies to develop polymer-based nanotherapeutics that act directly on fat tissue and maintain weight loss. A video about Adipo is available at https://youtu.be/9RK7nNbGwnU.             “The first platform is based on the discovery of adipocyte browning which is the conversion of energy-storing bad fat cells into energy-burning good fat cells in the body. In particular, we harness the role of Notch signaling in adipocyte plasticity to induce browning and “burning” of bad fat by using small molecule Notch inhibitors,” Deng said. “The second platform technology that we incorporate is polymer-based nanoparticle delivery. We can control the delivery of those Notch inhibitors to bad fat cells and convert them to good fat cells.” Adipo Therapeutics is working toward proving the safety and efficacy of the technology in human fat cells. Promising results were presented at the NIDDK Adipose Tissue Niche workshop last November. A previous news release on the research can be found here.  “Preclinical proof of concept of this technology in inducing fat cell conversion and exerting anti-obesity effects has been successfully demonstrated in obesity models. The nanoparticle delivery platform not only bypasses the potential off-target effects of systemic delivery, but also provides continuous drug release that minimizes periodic drug injections,” Deng said. “This method could ultimately provide an easier and safer treatment for obese patients” Deng said the technology has great potential for clinical translation. “Notch signaling is highly conserved in the animal kingdom,” he said. “We also use an already FDA-approved polymer, which has shown significant progress in the clinical setting. The combination of these two components is expected to facilitate the translation of the technology.”              Adipo Therapeutics recognizes the potential of this technology for patients with diabetes.             “Obesity has been a big contributor to type 2 diabetes. What’s significant about our technology is that through local delivery of the nanoparticles into bad fat cells in obesity models, the glucose homeostasis is considerably improved,” Deng said. “In other words, this local fat cell conversion has beneficial effects on improving systemic metabolic profiles.”             Adipo Therapeutics is seeking funding to support further development and clinical translation. The company also seeks partnerships with firms and pharmaceutical companies interested in the technology.             Technology used by Adipo Therapeutics has been licensed through the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization. Adipo Therapeutics is a member of the Purdue Startup Class of 2017. Deng credits Purdue resources for getting the technology this far.             “Purdue has been so dynamic and supportive of this technology and process,” he said. “From our collaborator Dr. Shihuan Kuang in Animal Sciences who made the initial discovery that inhibition of Notch signaling promotes browning, to the Purdue Foundry and Entrepreneurship Leadership Academy, and additionally the National Science Foundation I-Corps program. The Purdue resources have been crucial in this startup experience.”


West Lafayette, IN, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- A Purdue-based startup is developing a disruptive nanotherapeutic platform that could induce conversion of bad fat to good fat in an effort to provide a safe and effective way to treat obesity and diabetes. Meng Deng, an assistant professor in Purdue’s Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, and School of Materials Engineering founded Adipo Therapeutics LLC to further develop, test and commercialize the technology. Shihuan Kuang, Purdue professor of animal sciences is also involved in the development of the technology.  Deng said obesity is a nationwide epidemic in dire need of a safe and effective solution.             “More than one-third of adults in the U.S. are affected by obesity, which results from the lack of balance between energy intake and energy expenditure,” he said. “There are approved anti-obesity drugs on the market that focus on decreasing energy intake by either suppressing appetite or reducing lipid absorption, but they have only produced limited success and are usually accompanied with unpleasant side effects.”             Adipo Therapeutics integrates two platform technologies to develop polymer-based nanotherapeutics that act directly on fat tissue and maintain weight loss. A video about Adipo is available at https://youtu.be/9RK7nNbGwnU.             “The first platform is based on the discovery of adipocyte browning which is the conversion of energy-storing bad fat cells into energy-burning good fat cells in the body. In particular, we harness the role of Notch signaling in adipocyte plasticity to induce browning and “burning” of bad fat by using small molecule Notch inhibitors,” Deng said. “The second platform technology that we incorporate is polymer-based nanoparticle delivery. We can control the delivery of those Notch inhibitors to bad fat cells and convert them to good fat cells.” Adipo Therapeutics is working toward proving the safety and efficacy of the technology in human fat cells. Promising results were presented at the NIDDK Adipose Tissue Niche workshop last November. A previous news release on the research can be found here.  “Preclinical proof of concept of this technology in inducing fat cell conversion and exerting anti-obesity effects has been successfully demonstrated in obesity models. The nanoparticle delivery platform not only bypasses the potential off-target effects of systemic delivery, but also provides continuous drug release that minimizes periodic drug injections,” Deng said. “This method could ultimately provide an easier and safer treatment for obese patients” Deng said the technology has great potential for clinical translation. “Notch signaling is highly conserved in the animal kingdom,” he said. “We also use an already FDA-approved polymer, which has shown significant progress in the clinical setting. The combination of these two components is expected to facilitate the translation of the technology.”              Adipo Therapeutics recognizes the potential of this technology for patients with diabetes.             “Obesity has been a big contributor to type 2 diabetes. What’s significant about our technology is that through local delivery of the nanoparticles into bad fat cells in obesity models, the glucose homeostasis is considerably improved,” Deng said. “In other words, this local fat cell conversion has beneficial effects on improving systemic metabolic profiles.”             Adipo Therapeutics is seeking funding to support further development and clinical translation. The company also seeks partnerships with firms and pharmaceutical companies interested in the technology.             Technology used by Adipo Therapeutics has been licensed through the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization. Adipo Therapeutics is a member of the Purdue Startup Class of 2017. Deng credits Purdue resources for getting the technology this far.             “Purdue has been so dynamic and supportive of this technology and process,” he said. “From our collaborator Dr. Shihuan Kuang in Animal Sciences who made the initial discovery that inhibition of Notch signaling promotes browning, to the Purdue Foundry and Entrepreneurship Leadership Academy, and additionally the National Science Foundation I-Corps program. The Purdue resources have been crucial in this startup experience.”


West Lafayette, IN, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- A Purdue-based startup is developing a disruptive nanotherapeutic platform that could induce conversion of bad fat to good fat in an effort to provide a safe and effective way to treat obesity and diabetes. Meng Deng, an assistant professor in Purdue’s Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, and School of Materials Engineering founded Adipo Therapeutics LLC to further develop, test and commercialize the technology. Shihuan Kuang, Purdue professor of animal sciences is also involved in the development of the technology.  Deng said obesity is a nationwide epidemic in dire need of a safe and effective solution.             “More than one-third of adults in the U.S. are affected by obesity, which results from the lack of balance between energy intake and energy expenditure,” he said. “There are approved anti-obesity drugs on the market that focus on decreasing energy intake by either suppressing appetite or reducing lipid absorption, but they have only produced limited success and are usually accompanied with unpleasant side effects.”             Adipo Therapeutics integrates two platform technologies to develop polymer-based nanotherapeutics that act directly on fat tissue and maintain weight loss. A video about Adipo is available at https://youtu.be/9RK7nNbGwnU.             “The first platform is based on the discovery of adipocyte browning which is the conversion of energy-storing bad fat cells into energy-burning good fat cells in the body. In particular, we harness the role of Notch signaling in adipocyte plasticity to induce browning and “burning” of bad fat by using small molecule Notch inhibitors,” Deng said. “The second platform technology that we incorporate is polymer-based nanoparticle delivery. We can control the delivery of those Notch inhibitors to bad fat cells and convert them to good fat cells.” Adipo Therapeutics is working toward proving the safety and efficacy of the technology in human fat cells. Promising results were presented at the NIDDK Adipose Tissue Niche workshop last November. A previous news release on the research can be found here.  “Preclinical proof of concept of this technology in inducing fat cell conversion and exerting anti-obesity effects has been successfully demonstrated in obesity models. The nanoparticle delivery platform not only bypasses the potential off-target effects of systemic delivery, but also provides continuous drug release that minimizes periodic drug injections,” Deng said. “This method could ultimately provide an easier and safer treatment for obese patients” Deng said the technology has great potential for clinical translation. “Notch signaling is highly conserved in the animal kingdom,” he said. “We also use an already FDA-approved polymer, which has shown significant progress in the clinical setting. The combination of these two components is expected to facilitate the translation of the technology.”              Adipo Therapeutics recognizes the potential of this technology for patients with diabetes.             “Obesity has been a big contributor to type 2 diabetes. What’s significant about our technology is that through local delivery of the nanoparticles into bad fat cells in obesity models, the glucose homeostasis is considerably improved,” Deng said. “In other words, this local fat cell conversion has beneficial effects on improving systemic metabolic profiles.”             Adipo Therapeutics is seeking funding to support further development and clinical translation. The company also seeks partnerships with firms and pharmaceutical companies interested in the technology.             Technology used by Adipo Therapeutics has been licensed through the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization. Adipo Therapeutics is a member of the Purdue Startup Class of 2017. Deng credits Purdue resources for getting the technology this far.             “Purdue has been so dynamic and supportive of this technology and process,” he said. “From our collaborator Dr. Shihuan Kuang in Animal Sciences who made the initial discovery that inhibition of Notch signaling promotes browning, to the Purdue Foundry and Entrepreneurship Leadership Academy, and additionally the National Science Foundation I-Corps program. The Purdue resources have been crucial in this startup experience.”


West Lafayette, IN, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- A Purdue-based startup is developing a disruptive nanotherapeutic platform that could induce conversion of bad fat to good fat in an effort to provide a safe and effective way to treat obesity and diabetes. Meng Deng, an assistant professor in Purdue’s Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, and School of Materials Engineering founded Adipo Therapeutics LLC to further develop, test and commercialize the technology. Shihuan Kuang, Purdue professor of animal sciences is also involved in the development of the technology.  Deng said obesity is a nationwide epidemic in dire need of a safe and effective solution.             “More than one-third of adults in the U.S. are affected by obesity, which results from the lack of balance between energy intake and energy expenditure,” he said. “There are approved anti-obesity drugs on the market that focus on decreasing energy intake by either suppressing appetite or reducing lipid absorption, but they have only produced limited success and are usually accompanied with unpleasant side effects.”             Adipo Therapeutics integrates two platform technologies to develop polymer-based nanotherapeutics that act directly on fat tissue and maintain weight loss. A video about Adipo is available at https://youtu.be/9RK7nNbGwnU.             “The first platform is based on the discovery of adipocyte browning which is the conversion of energy-storing bad fat cells into energy-burning good fat cells in the body. In particular, we harness the role of Notch signaling in adipocyte plasticity to induce browning and “burning” of bad fat by using small molecule Notch inhibitors,” Deng said. “The second platform technology that we incorporate is polymer-based nanoparticle delivery. We can control the delivery of those Notch inhibitors to bad fat cells and convert them to good fat cells.” Adipo Therapeutics is working toward proving the safety and efficacy of the technology in human fat cells. Promising results were presented at the NIDDK Adipose Tissue Niche workshop last November. A previous news release on the research can be found here.  “Preclinical proof of concept of this technology in inducing fat cell conversion and exerting anti-obesity effects has been successfully demonstrated in obesity models. The nanoparticle delivery platform not only bypasses the potential off-target effects of systemic delivery, but also provides continuous drug release that minimizes periodic drug injections,” Deng said. “This method could ultimately provide an easier and safer treatment for obese patients” Deng said the technology has great potential for clinical translation. “Notch signaling is highly conserved in the animal kingdom,” he said. “We also use an already FDA-approved polymer, which has shown significant progress in the clinical setting. The combination of these two components is expected to facilitate the translation of the technology.”              Adipo Therapeutics recognizes the potential of this technology for patients with diabetes.             “Obesity has been a big contributor to type 2 diabetes. What’s significant about our technology is that through local delivery of the nanoparticles into bad fat cells in obesity models, the glucose homeostasis is considerably improved,” Deng said. “In other words, this local fat cell conversion has beneficial effects on improving systemic metabolic profiles.”             Adipo Therapeutics is seeking funding to support further development and clinical translation. The company also seeks partnerships with firms and pharmaceutical companies interested in the technology.             Technology used by Adipo Therapeutics has been licensed through the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization. Adipo Therapeutics is a member of the Purdue Startup Class of 2017. Deng credits Purdue resources for getting the technology this far.             “Purdue has been so dynamic and supportive of this technology and process,” he said. “From our collaborator Dr. Shihuan Kuang in Animal Sciences who made the initial discovery that inhibition of Notch signaling promotes browning, to the Purdue Foundry and Entrepreneurship Leadership Academy, and additionally the National Science Foundation I-Corps program. The Purdue resources have been crucial in this startup experience.”


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.materialstoday.com

Who hasn’t had the frustrating experience of being without a phone after forgetting to recharge it? This could soon become a thing of the past thanks to technology being developed by Hydro-Québec and McGill University in Canada. Lithium-ion batteries have allowed the rapid proliferation of all kinds of mobile electronic devices such as phones, tablets and computers. These devices do require frequent re-charging, however, because of the limited energy density of their batteries. “With smart phones now, you can basically carry your whole office in that device, they are loaded with all sorts of applications so you need a lot of power to use it every day and sometimes you don’t have access to a plug to recharge,” says George Demopoulos, chair of Mining and Materials Engineering at McGill University. This has led to the development of portable solar chargers, but these hybrid devices are difficult to miniaturize due to packaging issues and their complex circuitry. To solve this problem, scientists at McGill University and Hydro-Québec’s research institute are working on a single device capable of harvesting and storing energy using light. In other words, a self-charging battery. A study reported in a paper in Nature Communications by Demopoulos and colleagues from the UK, Italy and Spain has now paved the way for these so-called light-charged batteries. The study shows that a standard cathode from a lithium-ion battery can be ‘sensitized’ to light by incorporating photo-harvesting dye molecules. “In other words,” says Andrea Paolella, the study’s lead author and a researcher at Hydro-Québec, “our research team was able to simulate a charging process using light as a source of energy.” Scientists will now have to build an anode to close the device’s circuit, allowing energy produced by the light-absorbing cathode to be transferred and stored. If they succeed, they will have built the world’s first 100% self-charging lithium-ion battery. The research team is already working on phase two of this project, thanks to a $564,000 grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. “We have done half of the job,” says Demopoulos, co-senior author of the paper with Hydro-Québec’s Karim Zaghib, a world leading expert on batteries. “We know that we can design the electrode that absorbs light. This grant will give us the opportunity to bridge the gap and demonstrate that this new concept of a light-chargeable battery is possible.” “I’m an optimist and I think we can get a fully working device,” says Paolella, who is also a former post-doctoral student from McGill. “Theoretically speaking, our goal is to develop a new hybrid solar-battery system, but depending on the power it can generate when we miniaturize it, we can imagine applications for portable devices such as phones”. “Hydro-Québec has a strong global position with regard to the development of innovative, high-performance and safe battery materials,” says Zaghib, director – energy storage and conservation at IREQ, Hydro-Québec’s research institute. While it may take a few years to complete the second phase of the project, Demopoulos believes this ‘passive form of charging’ could play an important role in portable devices of the future. This story is adapted from material from McGill University, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. Link to original source.


WEATHERFORD, Texas--(BUSINESS WIRE)--In a historic industry move, Cummins, Inc., the world’s largest manufacturer of diesel engines, (NYSE:CMI) now officially endorses and recommends two Power Service products – Diesel Kleen +Cetane Boost and Diesel Fuel Supplement +Cetane Boost – for use in diesel engines. The announcement comes after significant internal testing concluded both products meet Cummins® requirements, becoming the first fuel additive products that Cummins Inc. has ever officially recommended in the marketplace. Roger England, Director of Technical Quality and Materials Engineering for Cummins Inc., stated that, “In recent years diesel fuel quality has become increasingly important as engines evolve and the diesel fuel manufacturing processes change. The Power Service Diesel Kleen and Diesel Fuel Supplement additives provide easily-accessible solutions with proven technology to customers in the field when they encounter challenges with their fuel such as poor lubricity, low cetane numbers, low temperature operability issues, injector deposits, etc. Cummins Inc. is in a very unique position in that we design not only the engine but also the turbochargers, fuel system, and after treatment systems, which enables us to fully leverage the Power Service diesel fuel additive technologies.” With the advancement of diesel engine technology and to fully realize the benefits of today’s cleaner burning fuels, using Power Service Diesel Kleen +Cetane Boost as a year-round performance enhancer cleans dirty injectors, prevents injector sticking, smooths rough-running engines and can improve fuel economy. This all translates into maximizing overall engine performance. Diesel Fuel Supplement +Cetane Boost, recommended for use in cold winter months when temperatures drop below +30F, is a winterizer/anti-gel used to prevent fuel gelling and keep fuel-filters from plugging with ice and wax. When temperatures drop, paraffin (wax) in Ultra-Low-Sulfur Diesel fuel (ULSD) will gel, stopping fuel from flowing through the engine and water in the fuel can freeze on the facings of fuel-filters, blocking fuel flow. This formula provides trouble-free winter operation for diesel fuel. “This partnership allows Cummins to leverage Power Service’s wide distribution network and industry leading technology to make diesel fuel solutions more accessible to our customers,” said Gary Ross, Director of Global Mining Business, Cummins Filtration. “When Cummins and Power Service began to discuss the endorsement partnership, it was a culmination of 60-years of hard work and dedication to developing the most consistent and effective diesel additives on the market,” said President of Power Service Products Ed Kramer. “This partnership is a confirmation of Power Service’s continued commitment to our customers and to the entire industry.” Cummins Inc., a global power leader, is a corporation of complementary business units that design, manufacture, distribute and service diesel and natural gas engines and related technologies, including fuel systems, controls, air handling, filtration, emission solutions and electrical power generation systems. Headquartered in Columbus, Indiana, (USA) Cummins currently employs approximately 55,400 people worldwide and serves customers in approximately 190 countries and territories through a network of approximately 600 company-owned and independent distributor locations and approximately 7,400 dealer locations. Cummins earned $1.39 billion on sales of $17.5 billion in 2016. Press releases can be found on the Web at www.cummins.com. Follow Cummins on Twitter at www.twitter.com/cummins and on YouTube at www.youtube.com/cumminsinc. Power Service Products, a third-generation family, woman- and veteran-owned company, opened for business in 1956 in a small one-car garage and has since grown into one of the industry’s greatest success stories. The company’s research laboratory is a recognized leader in the development of a complete line of proprietary-formulated diesel fuel additives which are sold in highly concentrated formulations for large commercial operations and in retail packages available at truck stops and automotive retailers nationwide. For more information about Power Service, visit the company’s website at www.powerservice.com. Follow Power Service Products on Twitter at www.twitter.com/pspadditives and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/powerserviceproducts.

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