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The development of the technology originated in the lab of Lia Stanciu, a professor of materials engineering at Purdue in 2009. The technology could eliminate the need for a second surgery to remove conventional hardware. "Currently, most implants use stainless steel and titanium alloys for strength. This can cause long-term change in the mechanics of the specific region and eventual long-term deterioration," Stanciu said. "Additionally medical operations that require an orthopedic implant must be followed-up with a second surgery to remove the implant or the accompanying hardware of the implant resulting in higher medical costs and an increased risk of complications." Co-inventors of the technology are Stanciu; Eric Nauman, a professor in Purdue's College of Engineering and director of the College of Engineering Honors Programs; Michael J Heiden, a PhD candidate; and Mahdi Dehestani, a graduate research assistant, both in Purdue's School of Materials Engineering. Nauman said the resorbable metal technology provides superior properties compared to conventional metals. "The implant has high porosity, which is empty space in the material, in which optimal vascular invasion can occur. This provides a way for cells to optimally absorb the material," he said. "Our technology is able to provide short-term fixation but eliminate the need for long-term hardware such as titanium or stainless steel that may require second surgeries to be retrieved," The orthopedic implant also uses manganese, which provides a better degradation rate, Stanciu added. "Current resorbable metals are made with magnesium; however, this provides many adverse side effects to the body and degrades very quickly," she said. "We decided to use manganese instead of magnesium. Through studies we found that we can control the degradation rates from 22 millimeters per year to 1.2 millimeters per year pretty consistently. We also saw that manganese has a very good corrosion rate over time." Nauman said the technology still exhibits the usual benefits associated with using biomaterials. "With this technology we are able to tailor the surfaces such as de-alloying the surface to provide a better material for cells to grab on to and grow," he said. "We were also able to show that we could control cell attachment proliferation, an increase of the number of cells. Our technology still has all these usual benefits in addition to controlling the degradation rates of the metals." Explore further: Magnesium surgical implants can be designed to biodegrade, promote bone growth


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Who hasn't lived through the frustrating experience of being without a phone after forgetting to recharge it? This could one day be a thing of the past thanks to technology being developed by Hydro-Québec and McGill University. Lithium-ion batteries have allowed the rapid proliferation of all kinds of mobile devices such as phones, tablets and computers. These tools however require frequent re-charging because of the limited energy density of their batteries. "With smart phones now, you can basically carry your whole office in that device, they are loaded with all sorts of applications so you need a lot of power to use it everyday and sometimes, you don't have access to a plug to recharge," explains Professor George P. Demopoulos, chair of Mining and Materials Engineering at McGill University. This has led to the development of portable solar chargers but these hybrid devices are difficult to miniaturize due to their complex circuitry and packaging issues. To solve this problem, scientists at McGill University and the Hydro-Québec's research institute are working on a single device capable of harvesting and storing energy using light. In other words, a self-charging battery. A novel concept presented in a Nature Communications paper by Professor Demopoulos and researchers at Hydro-Québec paves the way to these so-called light-charged batteries. The study shows that a standard cathode from a lithium-ion battery can be "sensitized" to light by incorporating photo-harvesting dye molecules. "In other words," says Dr. Andrea Paolella, the study's lead author and researcher at Hydro-Québec, "our research team was able to simulate a charging process using light as a source of energy." Scientists will now have to build an anode, the storage component, which will close the device's circuit, allowing energy produced by the cathode described in Nature Communications to be transferred and stored. If they succeed, they will have built the world's first 100% self-charging lithium-ion battery. The research team is already working on phase two of this project, thanks to a $564,000 grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. "We have done half of the job," says Professor Demopoulos, co-senior author of the paper with Hydro-Québec's Dr. Karim Zaghib, a world leading expert on batteries. "We know that we can design the electrode that absorbs light. "This grant will give us the opportunity to bridge the gap and demonstrate that this new concept of a light-chargeable battery is possible." "I'm an optimist and I think we can get a fully working device," says Paolella, who is also a former post-doctoral student from McGill. "Theoretically speaking, our goal is to develop a new hybrid solar-battery system, but depending on the power it can generate when we miniaturize it, we can imagine applications for portable devices such as phones". "Hydro-Québec has a strong global position with regard to the development of innovative, high-performance and safe battery materials," says Karim Zaghib Director - Energy Storage and Conservation at IREQ, Hydro-Québec's research institute. While it may take a few years to complete the second phase of the project, Professor Demopoulos believes this "passive form of charging" could play an important role in portable devices of the future...


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Scientists have been researching luminous coloured quantum dots (QDs) since the 1980s. These nanocrystals are now part of our everyday lives: the electronics industry uses them in LCD televisions to enhance colour reproduction and image quality. Quantum dots are spherical nanocrystals made of a semiconductor material. When these crystals are excited by light, they glow green or red - depending on their size, which is typically between 2 and 10 nanometres. The spherical forms can be produced in a highly controlled manner. A few years ago, a new type of nanocrystal caught the attention of researchers more or less by chance: nanoplatelets. Like quantum dots, these two-dimensional structures are just a few nanometres in size, but have a more uniform flat, rectangular shape. They are extremely thin, often just the width of a few atomic layers, giving the platelets one of their most striking properties - their extremely pure colour. Until now the mechanism that explains how such platelets form has been a mystery. In collaboration with a US-based researcher, ETH professor David Norris and his team have now solved this mystery: "We now know that there's no magic involved in producing nanoplatelets, just science" stressed the Professor of Materials Engineering. In a study just published in the scientific journal Nature Materials, the researchers show how cadmium selenide nanoplatelets take on their particular flat shape. Researchers had previously assumed that this highly precise form required a type of template. Scientists suspected that a mixture of special compounds and solvents produced a template in which these flat nanocrystals then formed. However, Norris and his colleagues found no evidence that such shape templates had any role. On the contrary, they found that the platelets can grow through the simple melting of the raw substances cadmium carboxylate and selenium, without any solvent whatsoever. The team then took this knowledge and developed a theoretical model to simulate the growth of the platelets. Thanks to this model, the scientists show that a crystallised core occurs spontaneously with just a few cadmium and selenium atoms. This crystallised nucleus can dissolve again and reconfigure in a different form. However, once it has exceeded a critical size, it grows to form a platelet. For energy-related reasons, the flat crystal grows only on its narrow side, up to 1,000 times faster than on its flat side. Growth on the flat side is significantly slower because it would involve more poorly bonded atoms on the surface, requiring energy to stabilise them. Ultimately, the researchers also succeeded in confirming their model experimentally by creating pyrite (FeS2) nanoplatelets in the lab. They produced the platelets exactly according to the model prediction using iron and sulphur ions as base substances. "It's very interesting that we were able to produce these crystals for the first time with pyrite," says Norris. "That showed us that we can expand our research to other materials." Cadmium selenide is the most common semiconductor material used in the research of nanocrystals; however, it is highly toxic and thus unsuitable for everyday use. The researchers' goal is to produce nanoplatelets made from less toxic or non-toxic substances. At present, Norris can only speculate about the future potential of nanoplatelets. He says that they may be an interesting alternative to quantum dots as they offer several advantages; for example, they can generate colours such as green better and more brightly. They also transmit energy more efficiently, which makes them ideal for use in solar cells, and they would also be suitable for lasers. However, they have several disadvantages as well. Quantum dots, for example, allow infinitely variable colour through the formation of varying size crystals. Not so in the case of platelets: due to the stratification of the atomic layers, the colour can be changed only incrementally. Fortunately, this limitation can be mitigated with certain "tricks": by encapsulation of the platelets in another semiconductor, the wavelength of the light emitted can be tuned more precisely. Only time will tell whether this discovery will attract the interest of the display industry. Some companies currently use organic LED (OLED) technology, while others use quantum dots. How the technology will evolve is unclear. However, the ability to investigate a broad variety of nanoplatelet materials due to this work may provide the semiconductor nanocrystal approach with a new edge. Riedinger A, Ott FD, Mule A, Mazzotti S, Knüsel PN, Kress SJP, Prins F, Erwin SC, Norris DJ. An intrinsic growth instability in isotropic materials leads to quasi-two-dimensional nanoplatelets. Nature Materials, Published Online 3rd April 2017. DOI 10.1038/nmat4889


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.materialstoday.com

BROWSE OUR BOOKS AND ORDER WITH AN EXCLUSIVE DISCOUNT Stop by the Elsevier/ Materials Today booth #1010 and browse new and classic books on display and take advantage of exclusive conference discounts. Not attending? You can still take advantage of conference savings by visiting Elsevier.com. Save 30% plus free shipping, use discount code MATER317 at the checkout. Meet Acquisitions Editor Christina Gifford, and Journals Executive Publisher Joe D‘Angelo at the booth, who will be on hand to discuss any book ideas, questions about our journals portfolio or publishing with Elsevier that you might have. Be sure to stop by the booth (#1010) daily or click here to complete the online survey to enter our book-a-day giveaway. If you win, which book will you choose? Click here for full terms and conditions. The essential, unique Reference Module in Materials Science and Materials Engineering is live on ScienceDirect! The Reference Module combines thousands of new and exclusive articles along with the content of 13 Major Reference Works into one interdisciplinary and authoritative resource. Articles will be continuously reviewed, updated and commissioned by the world-leading editorial board to ensure you are at the forefront of research. Find out more about the Materials Science and Materials Engineering Reference Module here. STAY CONNECTED, OR WRITE FOR OUR BLOG! Catch up on new research, chat with your colleagues, learn from the experts, and find special deals from Elsevier through our social media sites! You can join our Engineering communities on Facebook and Twitter. Also, be sure to check out our articles on SciTech Connect, our blog for the science and technology community. If you are interested in submitting a blog post, complete the contribution form and we’ll be in touch! FIND THE BEST HOME FOR YOUR RESEARCH Materials Today is dedicated to the creation and sharing of materials science knowledge and experience. Supported by Elsevier, we publish journals that provide authors and readers with comprehensive coverage across materials science, spanning ground breaking discoveries to highly specialized research.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

TORONTO, ON--(Marketwired - February 13, 2017) - Electrovaya (TSX: EFL) ( : EFLVF) is pleased to welcome Professor Carolyn Hansson CM, FCAE, FRSC, one of Canada's influential and innovative engineers to the Electrovaya Board of Directors. Professor Hansson has a long and distinguished career in industries such as Lockheed Martin (Martin Marietta), Danish Corrosion Labs and Bell Labs as well in academia (Waterloo, Queens, Columbia & SUNY) and was earlier a member of the Board of a TSX and NASDAQ listed Alternate Energy Company (Hydrogenics). A Professor of Materials Engineering at the University of Waterloo, Dr. Hansson is the recipient of many awards including the Order of Canada and is a member of several influential committees within North America and Europe. During her tenure as Vice President of Research at Waterloo University Professor Hansson drove innovation across all disciplines of the University. She has wide connections within innovation circles in Canada, USA and Europe having lived and worked on both sides of the Atlantic. "Carolyn has great practical experience in industry, government and academia and we are delighted that she has agreed to join the Board of Directors at Electrovaya," said Dr. Sankar Das Gupta, Chairman & CEO of Electrovaya. "The advanced Lithium Ion battery is the key defining technology needed today and Electrovaya provides this critical next generation technology to the emerging alternate energy sector. I am very pleased to join the Board and help build the Company," said Prof. Hansson. Electrovaya Inc. (TSX: EFL) ( : EFLVF) designs, develops and manufactures proprietary Lithium Ion Super Polymer® batteries, battery systems, and battery-related products for energy storage, clean electric transportation and other specialized applications. Electrovaya, through its fully owned subsidiary, Litarion GmbH, also produces cells, electrodes and SEPARION® ceramic separators and has manufacturing capacity of about 500MWh/annum. Electrovaya is a technology focused company with extensive patents and other Intellectual Property. Headquartered in Ontario, Canada, Electrovaya has production facilities in Canada and Germany with customers around the globe. To learn more about how Electrovaya and Litarion are powering mobility and energy storage, please explore www.electrovaya.com, www.litarion.com and www.separion.com This press release contains forward-looking statements, including statements that relate to, among other things, revenue forecasts, technology development progress, plans for shipment using the Company's technology, production plans, the Company's markets, objectives, goals, strategies, intentions, beliefs, expectations and estimates, and can generally be identified by the use of words such as "may", "will", "could", "should", "would", "likely", "possible", "expect", "intend", "estimate", "anticipate", "believe", "plan", "objective" and "continue" (or the negative thereof) and words and expressions of similar import. Although the Company believes that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are reasonable, such statements involve risks and uncertainties, and undue reliance should not be placed on such statements. Certain material factors or assumptions are applied in making forward-looking statements, and actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied in such statements. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations include but are not limited to: general business and economic conditions (including but not limited to currency rates and creditworthiness of customers); Company liquidity and capital resources, including the availability of additional capital resources to fund its activities; level of competition; changes in laws and regulations; legal and regulatory proceedings; the ability to adapt products and services to the changing market; the ability to attract and retain key executives; and the ability to execute strategic plans. Additional information about material factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations and about material factors or assumptions applied in making forward-looking statements may be found in the Company's most recent annual and interim Management's Discussion and Analysis under "Risk and Uncertainties" as well as in other public disclosure documents filed with Canadian securities regulatory authorities. The Company does not undertake any obligation to update publicly or to revise any of the forward-looking statements contained in this document, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.cemag.us

Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) laboratories often serve as birthplaces of unique products, such as antimicrobial silicone invented by Aiste Lisauskaite and her supervisor Dr. Virginija Jankauskaite. The researchers believe that the new product will be extremely useful both for household and medical purposes. Lisauskaite, who is a PhD student at the KTU Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Design, Department of Materials Engineering, presented her invention at the Life Sciences Baltics Conference last year. Her innovation was selected as one of the top five at the conference, and received enormous attention of industry professionals from various countries. “The silicone has antimicrobial effect both on gram-positive and on gram-negative microbial strains and fungi. Its antimicrobial effect can be used in various situations, when there is a risk to acquire bacterial infection,” says Lisauskaite. Antimicrobial silicone can be used in hospitals, health care centers, and other similar institutions. “The new product can be used in blood, urinary, and respiratory catheters, it can be applied for various tubes and implants, and used for many different medical purposes. The household usage ranges from children toys’ lining, transport, or packaging,” Lisauskaitė says. Catheters or silicones, dipped in or coated with silver compounds, have already been used for some time. However, the antimicrobial silicone developed at KTU is based on completely different technology and different materials. So far, it is a unique product in the world. The researchers have been working on the production of the antimicrobial silicone for four years. “I have received many inquiries into the idea and its commercialization. In the future, I hope not only to develop my ideas, of which I have a lot of, but also to introduce competitive and advanced products to the market,” says Lisauskaite. Paulius Kozlovas, technology transfer manager at KTU National Innovation and Entrepreneurship Centre, is convinced that the innovative technology has broad commercialization possibilities. “We can definitely see that businesses today are more and more interested into innovative solutions. Aiste’s product has broad application possibilities, and we have already applied for European patent. After acquiring the patent and having the product’s intellectual rights protected, we will be able to proceed with discussions with potential investors. I see huge potential of success in international markets and the possibility to attract foreign investors to Lithuania,” says Kozlovas.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: phys.org

Lisauskaite, who is a PhD student at the KTU Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Design, Department of Materials Engineering, has presented her invention at the Life Sciences Baltics Conference last year. Her innovation was selected as one of the top five at the Conference, and received enormous attention of industry professionals from various countries. "The silicone has antimicrobial effect both on gram-positive and on gram-negative microbial strains and fungi. Its antimicrobial effect can be used in various situations, when there is a risk to acquire bacterial infection," says Lisauskaite. Antimicrobial silicone can be used in hospitals, health care centres and in other similar institutions. "The new product can be used in blood, urinary and respiratory catheters, it can be applied for various tubes and implants, and used for many different medical purposes. The household usage ranges from children toys' lining, transport or packaging," Lisauskaitė is convinced. Catheters or silicones, dipped in or coated with silver compounds have been already used for some time. However, the antimicrobial silicone developed at KTU is based on completely different technology and different materials. So far, it is a unique product in the world. The researchers have been working on the production of the antimicrobial silicone for 4 years. "I have received many inquiries into the idea and its commercialisation. In the future, I hope not only to develop my ideas, of which I have a lot of, but also to introduce competitive and advanced products to the market," says Lisauskaite, a young researcher at KTU. Paulius Kozlovas, technology transfer manager at KTU National Innovation and Entrepreneurship Centre is convinced that the innovative technology has broad commercialisation possibilities. "We can definitely see that businesses today are more and more interested into innovative solutions. Aiste's product has broad application possibilities, and we have already applied for European patent. After acquiring the patent and having the product's intellectual rights protected, we will be able to proceed with discussions with potential investors. I see huge potential of success in international markets and the possibility to attract foreign investors to Lithuania," says Kozlovas. Explore further: Does Agion silver technology work as an antimicrobial?


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Antimicrobial silicone was invented by a KTU Ph.D. student Aiste Lisauskaite and her supervisor Dr. Virginija Jankauskaite; the researchers believe that the new product will be extremely useful both for household and medical purposes Kaunas University of Technology (KTU) laboratories often serve as birthplaces of unique products, such as antimicrobial silicone invented by a KTU PhD student Aiste Lisauskaite and her supervisor Dr Virginija Jankauskaite. The researchers believe that the new product will be extremely useful both for household and medical purposes. Lisauskaite, who is a PhD student at the KTU Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Design, Department of Materials Engineering, has presented her invention at the Life Sciences Baltics Conference last year. Her innovation was selected as one of the top five at the Conference, and received enormous attention of industry professionals from various countries. "The silicone has antimicrobial effect both on gram-positive and on gram-negative microbial strains and fungi. Its antimicrobial effect can be used in various situations, when there is a risk to acquire bacterial infection", says Lisauskaite. Antimicrobial silicone can be used in hospitals, health care centres and in other similar institutions. "The new product can be used in blood, urinary and respiratory catheters, it can be applied for various tubes and implants, and used for many different medical purposes. The household usage ranges from children toys' lining, transport or packaging", Lisauskait? is convinced. Catheters or silicones, dipped in or coated with silver compounds have been already used for some time. However, the antimicrobial silicone developed at KTU is based on completely different technology and different materials. So far, it is a unique product in the world. The researchers have been working on the production of the antimicrobial silicone for 4 years. "I have received many inquiries into the idea and its commercialisation. In the future, I hope not only to develop my ideas, of which I have a lot of, but also to introduce competitive and advanced products to the market", says Lisauskaite, a young researcher at KTU. Paulius Kozlovas, technology transfer manager at KTU National Innovation and Entrepreneurship Centre is convinced that the innovative technology has broad commercialisation possibilities. "We can definitely see that businesses today are more and more interested into innovative solutions. Aiste's product has broad application possibilities, and we have already applied for European patent. After acquiring the patent and having the product's intellectual rights protected, we will be able to proceed with discussions with potential investors. I see huge potential of success in international markets and the possibility to attract foreign investors to Lithuania", says Kozlovas.


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: phys.org

The process of electrophoretic deposition (EPD) uses an electric field to drive colloidal particles suspended in a liquid from a solution onto a conductive substrate. Commonly used to apply paint to cars, EPD also is utilized to coat ceramics, metals and polymers with a range of materials and for 3-D printing objects. Developed using a particle dynamics framework and run on the Vulcan supercomputing system at LLNL, the newly published model tracks every single particle during the entire EPD process—each particle is about 200 nanometers wide, roughly the diameter of the smallest bacteria. The research is published in the Dec. 20 issue of the journal Langmuir . "This gives us more information than any model before and fresh insights that were previously inaccessible," said the study's LLNL postdoctoral researcher Brian Giera. "Within this particle dynamics framework we were able to get really detailed information. In terms of understanding the EPD process in detail, this is a first-of-its kind." Over a period of two years, the team, led by principal investigator Todd Weisgraber, a researcher from LLNL's Materials Engineering Division, developed the model and ran several dozens of different simulations, changing the strength of the electrical field and the concentration of salt in the system. Not only does the strength of the electrical field affect the development of crystals, Giera said, but salt concentration, surprisingly, also plays a key role. Giera said the model could be used to better understand deposition kinetics, determine how fast to build and anticipate resulting crystallinity, which could impact how armor is produced, and how coatings are applied using the EPD process. "The model is poised to take on a lot of questions," Giera said. "It gives us more predictive information to optimize the system." Luis Zepeda-Ruiz, a scientist in the Lab's Materials Science Division, built the initial model containing all the essential mechanisms before Giera took over the work. He said the model can be augmented to allow for virtually any type of material, extending the science to a broad range of applications. "Our computational model can access details that are extremely difficult to observe in real experiments," Zepeda-Ruiz said. "It also can be used when experiments fail to reproduce results, when the solution ages and changes its chemistry. Now we have a pure, reproducible means for doing EPD, and that's a benefit." The model has been so well received by the scientific community that it was selected to be presented in a keynote speech by Giera at the international Electrophoretic Deposition Conferences Series held in South Korea in October. LLNL researcher Andy Pascall, an expert in EPD, helped define the model's initial parameter choices and is working on validating it for future implementation. Pascall said the model will be particularly useful to the field of photonics science, which requires precise control over crystallization. "Photonic crystallization is interesting to the scientific community in general. The way this has been done before in the lab has been through trial and error," Pascall said. "It's fair to say this is the only particle-based EPD model out there. Having a model that can be predictive allows you to run hundreds of virtual experiments that would take us months to do in the lab." Next, Giera will study how the colloidal particles re-suspend and, more importantly, tailor the model to account for particles of different sizes. Explore further: Theoretical model reveals how droplets grow around tiny particles on a surface More information: Brian Giera et al. Mesoscale Particle-Based Model of Electrophoretic Deposition, Langmuir (2017). DOI: 10.1021/acs.langmuir.6b04010


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.acnnewswire.com

Silicon nanowires fabricated using an imprinting technology could be the way of the future for transistor-based biosensors. Korean researchers are improving the fabrication of transistor-based biosensors by using silicon nanowires on their surface. The team, led by Won-Ju Cho of Kwangwoon University in Seoul, based their device on the 'dual-gate field-effect transistor' (DG FET). When molecules bind on a field-effect transistor, a change happens in the surface's electric charge. This makes FETs good candidates for detecting biological and chemical elements. Dual-gate FETs are particularly good candidates because they amplify this signal several times. But they can still be improved. The team used a method called 'nanoimprint lithography' to fabricate silicon nanowires onto the surface of a DG FET and compared its sensitivity and stability with conventional DG FETs. Field-effect transistors using silicon nanowires have already been drawing attention as promising biosensors because of their high sensitivity and selectivity, but they are difficult to manufacture. The size and position of silicon nanowires fabricated using a bottom-up approach, such as chemical vapor deposition, cannot always be perfectly controlled. Top-down approaches, such as using an electron or ion beam to draw nanorods onto a surface, allow better control of size and shape, yet they are expensive and limited by low throughput. Cho and his colleagues fabricated their silicon nanowires using nanoimprint lithography. In this method, a thin layer of silicon was placed on top of a substrate. This layer was then pressed using a nanoimprinter, which imprints nano-sized wire-shaped lines into the surface. The areas between separate lines were then removed using a method called dry etching, which involves bombarding the material with chlorine ions. The resultant silicon nanowires were then added to a DG FET. The team found that their device was more stable and sensitive than conventional DG FETs. "We expect that the silicon-nanowire DG FET sensor proposed here could be developed into a promising label-free sensor for various biological events, such as enzyme-substrate reactions, antigen-antibody bindings and nucleic acid hybridizations [a method used to detect gene sequences]," conclude the researchers in their study published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials. Article information Cheol-Min Lim, In-Kyu Lee, Ki Joong Lee, Young Kyoung Oh, Yong-Beom Shin and Won-Ju Cho. Improved sensing characteristics of dual-gate transistor sensor using silicon nanowire arrays defined by nanoimprint lithography. Science and Technology of Advanced Materials, 2016; 18:1, 17-25. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14686996.2016.1253409 For further information please contact: Professor Won-Ju Cho*, Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Korea *E-mail: Journal information Science and Technology of Advanced Materials (STAM), http://www.tandfonline.com/STAM) is an international open access journal in materials science. The journal covers a broad spectrum of topics, including synthesis, processing, theoretical analysis and experimental characterization of materials. Emphasis is placed on the interdisciplinary nature of materials science and on issues at the forefront of the field, such as energy and environmental issues, as well as medical and bioengineering applications. For more information about STAM contact Mikiko Tanifuji Publishing Director Science and Technology of Advanced Materials E-mail: Press release distributed by ResearchSEA for Science and Technology of Advanced Materials.

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