MAST Carbon International Ltd

Henley on Thames, United Kingdom

MAST Carbon International Ltd

Henley on Thames, United Kingdom
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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: GC-SST.2010.7-9.;GC.NMP.2010-1 | Award Amount: 5.43M | Year: 2011

Supercapacitors are essential in electric vehicles for supplying power during acceleration and recovering braking energy. High power and sufficient energy density (per kilo) are required for both an effective power system but also to reduce weight. There are several issues to achieve a high performance/low weight power system that need to be addressed by various groups of scientists and engineers in an integrated framework. In this proposal, we have assembled a multidisciplinary Consortium of leading researchers, organisations, highly experienced industrialists, and highly active SMEs to tackle the problems. As a result, we are aiming at developing supercapacitors of both high power and high energy density at affordable levels by the automotive industry, and of higher sustainability than many current electrochemical storage devices. These targets will be achieved by integrating several novel stages: (a) computer simulations to optimise the power system and the design of the supercapacitor bank for different supercapacitor models, representing the different supercapacitor cells to be developed and tested in this project; (b) we shall use carbon-based electrodes to reduce the amount of rare and expensive metals; (c) we shall use electrolytes of high operating voltage to increase both power and energy density, although the problem is that they have large ions that reduce the effective surface area of porous electrodes due to low diffusivity; (d) in this case, innovative electrode structures will be developed based on combinations of high surface area/large pore activated carbon electrodes and low resistance carbon fibrous materials or carbon nanotubes; graphene will also be investigated.(e) novel methodologies will be developed to integrate the innovative electrode materials in the fabrication process for manufacturing large supercapacitors. These will be tested both at small-scale, and in realistic electric car test rig tests, and be cost and life-cycle-assessed.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-2012-1 | Award Amount: 1.50M | Year: 2012

CARVOC wants to solve the social, environmental and economic problem that represents the emission of VOC/TIC to the atmosphere through the development of innovative activated carbon filters (ACF) based on activated carbons (AC) produced from natural wastes, capable of adsorbing VOC/TIC emitted by highly pollutant industries or that may be released in industrial accidents or in terrorist attacks. The resulting ACF will be primarily integrated into industrial filtering systems and personal protection equipments but may be included in all products whose purpose is the VOC purification. One of the projects goals is to decrease global air pollution. The wastes to be used for R&D of AC are the hemp residues from farming and industrial processing. They are a particularly suitable and novel raw material since hemp represents a sustainable crop with beneficial environmental characteristics not offered by other plants and it has many advantages for the preparation of AC mainly, large amounts of hemp residues are generated and its high carbon content. Different methods for the activation of the residues will be used for preparing AC with a suitable porous texture for gas and vapor phase pollutant abatement. There will be selected the most frequent and harmful VOC for the environment and with the greatest toxicity for Humans and Ecosystems. Adsorption tests will be carried out with the selected VOC, to determine the adsorption capacity of the AC towards those compounds, both in mixture or separately and, to evaluate the performance of the materials obtained. In CARVOC the SMEs will benefit from the R&D conducted by the RTDs, because it will be obtained an ACF with improved structural and functional features to existing AC on the market since it will be produced from a new precursor, hemp fiber, and will be specifically activated for the purification of VOC. Moreover CARVOC will help to reduce the current 26% AC imports rate by producing a competitive AC made of hemp wastes.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-10-2014 | Award Amount: 6.49M | Year: 2015

Wide scale implementation of renewable energy will require growth in production of inexpensive, efficient energy storage systems. The extension of battery technology to large-scale storage will become necessary as intermittent renewable energy sources such as wind, solar and wave become more prevalent and integrated into electrical grid. Lithium-ion battery appears as quite mature for this application but its cost per mWh remains high in comparison to high temperature technology such as Zebra, which integrate low cost sodium base materials. Furthermore, as the use of large format lithium battery becomes widespread; increase demand for lithium commodity chemicals combined with geographically constrained Li mineral reserves will drive up prices. Based on the wide availability and low cost of sodium, ambient temperature sodium-based batteries have the potential for meeting large scale grid energy storage needs. In NAIADES we will demonstrate the feasibility of ambient temperature Na-ion battery from the knowledge and achievement that has been done at the laboratory scale, up to a module demonstration in a realistic application environment. Several European industrials, institutes and universities belonging to ALISTORE-ERI have decided to join their efforts to assess the Na-ion technology for stationary storage application through building a 1 kW modules system Na-ion cell which will serve as data base to demonstrate economical and public acceptance. These module prototypes will be developed to meet performances in a 1kW system in a cost-effective, sustainable and environmental-friendly manner. New energy policy will be developed to integer the Na-ion battery in the Smart Grid initiative and promote the penetration of renewable energy in the electric network.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IAPP | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-IAPP | Award Amount: 2.41M | Year: 2013

This project aims to develop novel materials and technologies for remediation of contaminated soils and groudwaters from xenobiotics (e.g. man-made) contaminants, via a programme of knowledge exchange and scientific work actions between 8 partner organisations (6 from three EU countries and 2 from an ICPC country). Chemical and biological approaches will be combined to develop novel technologies for removal of toxic metals/metalloids and recalcitrant organic contaminants from contaminated soil and groundwaters. A range of methods, based on iron chemistry and biogeochemistry, bioremediation and electrochemical oxidation will be employed at laboratory and pilot/field scale, to produce integrated clean-up solutions for problem contaminated sites and contaminants. The project brings together a multidisciplinary consortium of specialists from different areas of contaminated land management, environmental (geo)chemistry, nanotechnology, (geo)microbiology and physical, analytical, synthetic, polymer and surface chemistry, working with a common aim of developing new and efficient methods of contaminant removal from soils, and groundwaters.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2013.5.1.2 | Award Amount: 7.73M | Year: 2014

This proposal aims to develop high-potential novel and environmentally benign technologies and processes for post-combustion CO2 capture leading to real breakthroughs. The proposal includes all main separation technologies for post-combustion CO2 capture; absorption, adsorption and membranes. Enzyme based systems, bio-mimicking systems and other novel forms of CO2 binding will be explored. For each technology we will focus on chosen set of promising concepts (four for absorption, two for adsorption and two for membranes). We aim to achieve 25% reduction in efficiency penalty compared to a demonstrated state-of-the-art capture process in the EU project CESAR and deliver proof-of-concepts for each technology. The various technologies and associated process concepts will be assessed using a novel methodology for comparing new and emerging technologies, for which limited data are available and the maturity level varies substantially. Based on the relative performance using various performance indicators, a selection of two breakthrough technologies will be made. Those two technologies will be further studied in order to do a more thorough benchmarking against demonstrated state-of-the-art technologies. A technological roadmap, based on a thorough gap analysis, for industrial demonstration of the two technologies will finally be established. HiPerCap involves 15 partners, from both the public and private sectors (research, academia, and industry), from 6 different EU Member States and Associated States, and three International Cooperation Partner Countries (Russia, Canada, and Australia). The HiPerCap consortium includes all essential stakeholders in the technology supply chain for CCS: power companies, RTD providers, suppliers, manufacturers (of power plants, industrial systems, equipment, and materials), and engineering companies.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP.2013.1.1-1 | Award Amount: 9.30M | Year: 2013

The present project is aimed to the development of a multi-step process for the production of second-generation biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass in a cost-efficient way through the use of tailored nanostructured catalysts. The proposed process is based on the cascade combination of three catalytic transformations: catalytic pyrolysis, intermediate deoxygenation and hydrodeoxygenation. The sequential coupling of catalytic steps will be an essential factor for achieving a progressive and controlled biomass deoxygenation, which is expected to lead to liquid biofuels with a chemical composition and properties similar to those of oil-derived fuels. According to this strategy, the best nanocatalytic system in each step will be selected to deal with the remarkable chemical complexity of lignocellulose pyrolysis products, as well as to optimize the bio-oil yield and properties. Since hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is outlined in this scheme as the ultimate deoxygenation treatment, the overall hydrogen consumption should be strongly minimized, resulting in a significant improvement of the process economic profitability. The use of nanostructured catalysts will be the key tool for obtaining in each chemical step of the cascade process, the optimum deoxygenation degree, as well as high efficiency, in terms both of matter and energy, minimizing at the same time the possible environmental impacts. The project will involve experiments at laboratory, bench and pilot plant scales, as well as a viability study of its possible commercial application. Thereby, the integrated process will be assessed according to technical, economic, social, safety, toxicological and environmental criteria. The consortium will be formed by 17 partners, including 4 research institutions, 6 universities, 5 large industries and 2 SME.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2012.6.3-1 | Award Amount: 3.85M | Year: 2012

The bio-electrochemically-assisted recovery of valuable resources from urine (ValueFromUrine) project will develop, optimize and evaluate an innovative bio-electrochemical system that allows for the recovery of phosphorus (P), ammonia (NH3) and electricity (E) or hydrogen from urine. The innovative principle is that biological oxidation of organics (present in urine) at a bio-anode drives both the transport of ammonium over a membrane (which allows the recovery of NH3) and the production of alkalinity (which can be utilized for the precipitation of P-salts). Toilets and urinals that collect urine separately from other wastewater streams, are increasingly being installed in newly constructed utility buildings or during renovation of old buildings. Unlike any state-of-the art technology, the ValueFromUrine technology not only has the potential to recover over 95% of the P and NH3 from urine, but also to produce chemicals (NaOH, KOH) and energy. The ValueFromUrine consortium is made up of complementary knowledge institutes, SMEs and industry partner, each of them leading in one or more relevant fields (electrochemistry, membrane technology, microbiology, micro-pollutants and decentralized wastewater treatment). Moreover, all commercial partners have experience in the validation of new technologies. The participating SMEs have a key function in the consortium, which is reflected by the fact that 41% of the requested funding will go to the SMEs for research and technology development.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-13-2014 | Award Amount: 6.23M | Year: 2015

Chronic liver disease affects about 29-million Europeans accounting for about 170,000 deaths at a cost of around 15.8bn. This chronic non-communicable disease is increasing at an alarming rate due to increasing European obesity, alcohol use and ageing. The three main causes of the disease; alcohol, fatty liver and viral hepatitis are amenable to prevention and treatment. Gut-derived endotoxins and bacterial translocation are central factors implicated in the pathogenesis of fatty liver disease and, the development and progression of cirrhosis. In cirrhosis, current state-of-the-art therapy to prevent recurrent complications of advanced cirrhosis is to use poorly absorbed antibiotics but long-term antibiotic therapy has problems associated with bacterial resistance, infection with resistant organisms and the cost. Treatment of fatty liver and modulation of bacterial translocation in early cirrhosis to prevent complications is an unmet need. Our academic-industrial consortium has developed a novel, patented, safe and cheap nanoporous carbon that modulates the effects of bacterial translocation in animal models of liver disease. Our feasibility studies demonstrate that this product advances the current state-of-the-art, is a TRL 4/5 and is now ready for validation through clinical trials. We propose to investigate the safety and efficacy of this novel nanoporous carbon in patients with fatty liver disease and cirrhosis. If successful, we will be able to confirm an innovative, cost-effective and novel strategy for the management of this chronic disease in a European population. Exploitation of the results of the CARBALIVE project will support the continued development of this carbon through additional private and public sector investment. The use of this innovative therapy is expected to reduce the economic burden of the disease in Europe, allow patients to achieve enhanced quality of life, improve survival, and allow many patients to return to economic productivity.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2011.3.1.9-1 | Award Amount: 4.21M | Year: 2012

Global primary metal resources are rapidly dwindling and the mining and metallurgical industries are increasingly turning to lower grade minerals for metal extraction, typically increasing costs. Innovative environmental metal extraction techniques are required to increase mining sustainability, increase revenues and lower its impact on the environment. In this project, bioelectrochemical technology is proposed as an entirely new method for metal processing with the aim to produce marketable metal-containing (intermediate) products with low environmental impact compared to state-of-the art technologies. In bioelectrochemical technology, microorganisms catalyse the reaction occurring on one or both electrodes of an electrolytic cell. Such cells are called Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) when power is produced and Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs) when power is required to drive the desired reaction. Recently, it has been shown that Cu2\ is reduced to metallic copper on the cathode of a MFC coupled to the biological oxidation of organic matter and with resulting electricity generation. The proof-of-principle MFC almost completely recovered the Cu2\ in its metallic form (decrease in concentration from 1 g/L to < 1 mg/L) and produced a maximum power density of 0.8 W/m2. Bioelectrochemical technology can be used for the base metals copper, nickel, iron, zinc, cobalt and lead, which are mined, processed and used in large quantities. These metals are ubiquitous in process- and waste streams from the mining and metallurgical industry and therefore application of bioelectrochemistry for these metals has a high impact. Compared to traditional techniques, the use of Bioelectrochemical technology allows high recovery efficiencies, increased metal selectivity and reduced use of energy with in some cases (e.g. copper reduction) electricity production.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IAPP | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-IAPP | Award Amount: 1.45M | Year: 2012

The aim of the project is to manufacture an adsorbent carbon based cartridge within a perfusion system for the removal of strongly, protein bound and macromolecular toxins and inflammatory molecules including hepatic and uremic toxins, exotoxin, endotoxin and cytokines. These molecules are responsible for systemic toxicity effects and their removal is negligible or unsustained in current systems available for the treatment of renal, hepatic and multiple organ failure (MOF) related to sepsis. Additionally, removal of these molecules during perfusion of organs for transplant will moderate the inflammatory stress response which currently limits the success of marginal organs. The project considers economical and environmental impact in the development of processing strategies which optimise the adsorptive, biocompatible and hydrodynamic design properties of the resultant system for these applications. The project brings together a multidisciplinary consortium of specialists with many years experience in the development, analysis and clinical implementation of adsorbent biomaterials in extracorporeal systems and in the development of transplant organ preservation techniques.

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