Palmerston North, New Zealand
Palmerston North, New Zealand

Massey University is a university located in Palmerston North, New Zealand, Albany, New Zealand and Wellington, New Zealand. Massey University has approximately 35,000 students, 17,000 of whom are extramural or distance learning students.Massey University has campuses in Palmerston North , Wellington and Auckland . It also has a business school accredited by The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Research is undertaken on all three campuses. More than 3000 international students from more than 100 countries study at the university.Massey University is the only university in New Zealand offering degrees in aviation, dispute resolution, veterinary medicine and nanoscience. Massey's veterinary school is accredited by the American Veterinary Medical Association and is recognised in the United States, Australia, Canada, and Britain. Its agriculture programme is the highest ranked in New Zealand and 19th in Quacquarelli Symonds' world university subject rankings. Massey's Bachelor of Aviation is an internationally recognised and accredited qualification and is the first non-engineering degree to be recognised by the Royal Aeronautical Society and has ISO9001-2000 accreditation. Wikipedia.

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News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

(AP) — A Chinese leader on Tuesday urged international representatives to strike a "proper balance" between environmental and economic interests in Antarctica, as the frozen continent's vulnerability to climate change raises worries that some nations could seek to exploit its natural resources. China is seeking to carve out a greater role in determining the continent's future while hosting delegates from more than two dozen nations that have agreed to an Antarctic protection treaty. Vice Premier Zhang Gaoli — who sits on the Communist Party's all-powerful, seven-member Politburo Standing Committee — told participants that the fate of Antarctica's fragile environment bears on human survival. "There needs to be a proper balance between the protection and utilization of Antarctica in order to keep the environment green and sustain economic growth and cultural stability for mankind," Zhang said. His reference to economic interests fed into speculation that China and other nations are maneuvering to exploit mineral resources that could be exposed by a shrinking southern ice cap. U.S. delegate Kelly Falkner said that's highly unlikely under international agreements linked to the 1959 treaty. There also are practical concerns, given Antarctica's remoteness and harsh weather for much of the year. Environmental protection protocols under the Antarctic treaty are due to come up for reconsideration in 2048. But Falkner said it would require consensus among the treaty nations to change an existing framework that includes a mining ban. A bigger worry for the U.S. is that China could overtake it as the global leader in polar research, said Falkner, who heads the Office of Polar Programs for the National Science Foundation. Liu Zhenmin, a Chinese vice foreign minister, said Zhang's statements about economic growth referred to rising numbers of Antarctic tourists from China and its commercial fishing vessels in the area. Liu told The Associated Press that China's interpretation of the treaty was that mining "would be prohibited forever." China acceded to the Antarctic treaty in 1983 and has since established four research stations. It plans to start construction of an airfield later this year and a fifth research station as early as 2018. It also has a new icebreaker under construction to augment the Xue Long, a Ukrainian-built vessel currently used to service its Antarctic missions. Yet while China has publicly emphasized its scientific ambitions, it also appears to be hedging against possible future development opportunities, said Marc Lanteigne, a senior lecturer on China and the polar regions at New Zealand's Massey University. Seven countries have made land claims in Antarctica. The United States and Russia have said they don't recognize the claims but have reserved the right to make future claims of their own. "In theory, there is the possibility of mining on the perimeter of Antarctica. More and more land might come open" due to climate change, Lanteigne said. "China and the other participants have expressed support (for the treaty) and don't want to seem like they're undermining it, but there is that level of uncertainty."


Patent
Agency For Science and Massey University | Date: 2015-03-19

The present disclosure relates to a sensor for indicating food quality comprising a semi-permeable film layer, the semi-permeable film layer comprising at least one integrally formed well having at least one sensing element disposed therein; wherein the well is sealed by a second film layer, the semi-permeable film layer being impermeable to said sensing element but is permeable to at least one analyte detectable by said sensing element.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

CORVALLIS, Ore. - The family dog could serve as a partner and ally in efforts to help children with disabilities incorporate more physical activity into their daily lives, a new study from Oregon State University indicates. In a case study of one 10-year-old boy with cerebral palsy and his family's dog, researchers found the intervention program led to a wide range of improvements for the child, including physical activity as well as motor skills, quality of life and human-animal interactions. "These initial findings indicate that we can improve the quality of life for children with disabilities, and we can get them to be more active," said Megan MacDonald, an assistant professor in OSU's College of Public Health and Human Sciences and corresponding author on the study. "And in this case, both are happening simultaneously, which is fantastic." The researchers detailed the child's experience in the adapted physical activity intervention program in a case study just published in the journal Animals. Co-authors are Monique Udell of the OSU College of Agricultural Sciences; Craig Ruaux of the OSU College of Veterinary Medicine; Samantha Ross of the OSU College of Public Health and Human Sciences; Amanda Tepfer of Norwich University and Wendy Baltzer of Massey University in New Zealand. The research was supported by the Division of Health Sciences at OSU. Children with physical disabilities such as cerebral palsy spend significantly less time participating in physical activity compared to their peers and are considered a health disparity group, meaning they generally face more health concerns than their peers. Researchers designed an adapted physical activity, animal-assisted intervention where the family dog would serve as a partner with the child in physical activities designed to help improve overall physical activity, motor skills and quality of life. The family dog is a good choice for this type of intervention because the animal is already known to the child and there is an existing relationship - and both the dog and the child will benefit from the activities, MacDonald said. Researchers took initial assessments of the child's daily physical activity, motor skills and quality of life before starting the eight-week intervention. A veterinarian examined the dog's fitness for participation and the human-animal interaction between the dog, a year-old Pomeranian, and the child was also assessed. Then the pair began the eight-week intervention, which included a supervised physical activity program once a week for 60 minutes and participation in activities such as brushing the dog with each hand; playing fetch and alternating hands; balancing on a wobble board; and marching on a balancing disc. "The dog would also balance on the wobble board, so it became a challenge for the child - if the dog can do it, I can, too," MacDonald said. "It was so cool to see the relationship between the child and the dog evolve over time. They develop a partnership and the activities become more fun and challenging for the child. It becomes, in part, about the dog and the responsibility of taking care of it." The dog and the child also had "homework," which included brushing the dog, playing fetch and going on daily walks. The child wore an accelerometer to measure physical activity levels at home. At the conclusion of the intervention, researchers re-assessed and found that the child's quality of life had increased significantly in several areas, including emotional, social and physical health, as assessed by the child as well as the parent. In addition, the child's sedentary behavior decreased and time spent on moderate to vigorous activity increased dramatically. "The findings so far are very encouraging," MacDonald said. "There's a chance down the road we could be encouraging families to adopt a dog for the public health benefits. How cool would that be?" The researchers also found that the relationship between the dog and the child improved over the course of the therapy as they worked together on various tasks. The dog's prosocial, or positive, behavior toward the child is a sign of wellbeing for both members of the team, said Udell, who is director of the Human-Animal Interaction Lab at OSU. "A closer child-dog bond increases the likelihood of lasting emotional benefits and may also facilitate long-term joint activity at home, such as taking walks, simply because it is enjoyable for all involved," she said. This study is one of the first to evaluate how a dog's behavior and wellbeing are affected by their participation in animal-assisted therapy, Udell noted. From an animal welfare standpoint, it is promising that the dog's behavior and performance on cognitive and physical tasks improved alongside the child's. Though the case study features only one child, the research team recruited several families with children with disabilities and their dogs to participate in the larger project, which was designed in part to test the design and methodology of the experiment and determine if it could be implemented on a larger scale. Based on the initial results, researchers hope to pursue additional studies involving children with disabilities and their family dogs, if funding can be secured. They would like to examine other benefits such a pairing might have, including the sense of responsibility the child appears to gain during the course of the intervention. "We're also learning a lot from our child participants," MacDonald said. "They're teaching us stuff about friendship with the animal and the responsibility of taking care of a pet, which allows us to ask more research questions about the influence of a pet on the child and their family."


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

"Now more than ever, it is important for companies in the agriculture supply chain to understand each other's challenges and needs," said Novus Area General Manager for East Asia Hangchu Tang. "Novus continuously invests in Novus academies, including the Poultry Academy, to provide a platform to engage with customers, key opinion leaders and industry partners to further this discussion. These are important activities for Novus, as they help to calibrate the company's activities with stakeholder desires." Topics included in this year's Novus Poultry Academy are the landscape of the global broiler industry, early nutrition and the effects of trace minerals on epigenetics from breeder to broiler, managing the gut health of broilers, formulating optimal starter feed, reducing broiler mortality, better understanding phytase applications in broiler feed, managing the feed system to optimize performance, improving the income of the integrator, and reducing the condemnation rate in the slaughterhouse through nutrition management. "Our partners are facing high production costs, animal welfare topics, meat quality challenges and wide variation in feed ingredient quality," said François Fraudeau, Novus president and CEO. "They want us to help them become more productive and more profitable, while meeting the social standards of the consumer." Invited speakers include Dr. Park Waldroup, Novus International's Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the Poultry Science Department of the University of Arkansas; Dr. Lucy Waldron, professor at Massey University with rich experience in researching the interrelationships between feed, digestion and nutrient utilization; Dr. Qiu Rongsheng, senior independent animal nutrition adviser and CEO of Euro & Asia (Beijing) Agricultural Technology Co. Ltd.; as well as Dr. Yan Fenglan, Novus International's senior manager of poultry research. The Novus Poultry Academy provides tools to help industry professionals become more competitive and successful in the global marketplace. For more information, please follow us on WeChat: NovusInternational, or contact Yuwei Liu at Yuwei.Liu@novusint.com. About Novus International, Inc. Novus International, Inc. is headquartered in metropolitan St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A. and serves customers in over 100 countries around the world. A global leader in developing animal health and nutrition solutions, Novus International's products include ALIMET® and MHA® feed supplements, ACTIVATE® nutritional feed acid, ACIDOMIX® preservative premixture, CIBENZA® enzyme feed additive, MINTREX® chelated trace minerals, SANTOQUIN® feed preservative, AGRADO® feed antioxidant and many other specialty ingredients. Stratum Nutrition, a division of Novus Nutrition Brands, LLC, focuses on human nutrition through specialty and functional ingredients for manufacturers of foods, beverages and dietary supplements (www.stratumnutrition.com). Novus is privately owned by Mitsui & Co. (U.S.A.), Inc. and Nippon Soda Co., Ltd. For more information, visit www.novusint.com. ©2017 Novus International, Inc. All rights reserved. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/novus-poultry-academy-provides-tools-for-success-with-tough-competition-300457028.html


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: ERC-ADG | Phase: ERC-ADG-2014 | Award Amount: 2.35M | Year: 2016

Fifteen years ago it was widely believed that asthma was an allergic/atopic disease caused by allergen exposure in infancy; this produced atopic sensitization and continued exposure resulted in eosinophilic airways inflammation, bronchial hyper-responsiveness and reversible airflow obstruction. It is now clear that this model is at best incomplete. Less than one-half of asthma cases involve allergic (atopic) mechanisms, and most asthma in low-and-middle income countries is non-atopic. Westernization may be contributing to the global increases in asthma prevalence, but this process appears to involve changes in asthma susceptibility rather than increased exposure to established asthma risk factors. Understanding why these changes are occurring is essential in order to halt the growing global asthma epidemic.This will require a combination of epidemiological, clinical and basic science studies in a variety of environments. A key task is to reclassify asthma phenotypes. These are important to: (i) better understand the aetiological mechanisms of asthma; (ii) identify new causes; and (iii) identify new therapeutic measures. There are major opportunities to address these issues using new techniques for sample collection from the airways (sputum induction, nasal lavage), new methods of analysis (microbiome, epigenetics), and new bioinformatics methods for integrating data from multiple sources and levels. There is an unprecedented potential to go beyond the old atopic/non-atopic categorization of phenotypes. I will therefore conduct analyses to re-examine and reclassify asthma phenotypes. The key features are the inclusion of: (i) both high and low prevalence centres from both high income countries and low-and-middle income countries; (ii) much more detailed biomarker information than has been used for previous studies of asthma phenotypes; and (iii) new bioinformatics methods for integrating data from multiple sources and levels.


Chisti Y.,Massey University
Journal of Biotechnology | Year: 2013

Production of algal crude oil has been achieved in various pilot scale facilities, but whether algal fuels can be produced in sufficient quantity to meaningfully displace petroleum fuels, has been largely overlooked. Limitations to commercialization of algal fuels need to be understood and addressed for any future commercialization. This review identifies the major constraints to commercialization of transport fuels from microalgae. Algae derived fuels are expensive compared to petroleum derived fuels, but this could change. Unfortunately, improved economics of production are not sufficient for an environmentally sustainable production, or its large scale feasibility. A low-cost point supply of concentrated carbon dioxide colocated with the other essential resources is necessary for producing algal fuels. An insufficiency of concentrated carbon dioxide is actually a major impediment to any substantial production of algal fuels. Sustainability of production requires the development of an ability to almost fully recycle the phosphorous and nitrogen nutrients that are necessary for algae culture. Development of a nitrogen biofixation ability to support production of algal fuels ought to be an important long term objective. At sufficiently large scale, a limited supply of freshwater will pose a significant limitation to production even if marine algae are used. Processes for recovering energy from the algal biomass left after the extraction of oil, are required for achieving a net positive energy balance in the algal fuel oil. The near term outlook for widespread use of algal fuels appears bleak, but fuels for niche applications such as in aviation may be likely in the medium term. Genetic and metabolic engineering of microalgae to boost production of fuel oil and ease its recovery, are essential for commercialization of algal fuels. Algae will need to be genetically modified for improved photosynthetic efficiency in the long term. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.V.


Raubenheimer D.,Massey University
Ecological Monographs | Year: 2011

A recent area of progress in nutritional ecology is a growing awareness that nutritional phenotypes are best understood in a multidimensional context, where foraging is viewed as a process of balancing the intake and use of multiple nutrients to satisfy complex and dynamic nutrient needs. Numerous laboratory studies have shown that this view can yield novel insights into unresolved questions and provide a framework for generating new hypotheses. By contrast, progress with this multidimensional view has been slow in the arena of ultimate interest to functional biologists, the field. One reason for this is that the Geometric Framework for nutrition that has been extensively used in laboratory experiments focuses on amounts of nutrients (e.g., required, eaten, or retained), and such data are typically very difficult or impossible to collect for most free-ranging animals. Further, many problems in field-based nutritional ecology involve comparisons of mixtures that are expressed as proportions (e.g., food, diet, body, or fecal compositions), rather than absolute amounts. As yet, however, no geometric framework has been established in nutritional ecology for this. Here I recommend an approach for the geometric analysis of nutritional mixtures, and illustrate its use in a variety of contexts by reanalyzing published data. Despite its simplicity, this approach holds considerable promise for furthering the study of field-based nutritional ecology. © 2011 by the Ecological Society of America.


Prince R.,Massey University
Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers | Year: 2014

Culture and creativity have been increasingly instrumentalised in policy programmes worldwide in recent decades. This has been associated with the rapid development of techniques for quantifying and measuring the sector. This paper argues that the development of these techniques has been central to the mobility of policies and policy concepts that instrumentalise culture and creativity. Using Ong and Collier's notion of global assemblage, it is argued that culture and creativity have been rendered technical in relation to the invention and circulation of a number of interlinked global forms, such as the 'creative industries' and the 'creative class', which are embedded in abstract, placeless, technical systems that provide them with an apparent universality. How this is achieved is examined in detail through a discussion of the work of a London-based consultancy specialising in cultural knowledge. The consultancy helps to produce this assemblage by doing the work of producing technical, calculative measures of culture and creativity that translate a messy social world into a set of ordered, rationalised representations that can be compared to similarly produced representations from elsewhere. Their work helps to convert topographical connections between places into topological relations across which appropriate global forms can move with relative ease. © 2013 The Author. Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers © 2013 Royal Geographical Society (with the Institute of British Geographers).


To compare the current status of global alcohol corporations with tobacco in terms of their role in global governance and to document the process by which this difference has been achieved and the consequences for alcohol control policy. Methods Participant observation in the global political arena, review of industry materials (submissions, publications, conference presentations, websites) and review of published literature formed the basis for the current analysis. Results Recent events in the global political arena have highlighted the difference in perception of the alcohol and tobacco industries which has allowed alcohol corporations to participate in the global governance arena in a way in which tobacco has not been able. The transnational producers of alcohol have waged a sophisticated and successful campaign during the past three decades, including sponsorship of intergovernmental events, funding of educational initiatives, research, publications and sponsoring sporting and cultural events. A key aspect has been the framing of arguments to undermine perceptions of the extent of alcohol-related harms to health by promoting ideas of a balance of benefits and harms. An emphasis on the heaviest drinkers has been used to promote the erroneous idea that 'moderate' drinkers experience no harm and a goal of alcohol policy should be to ensure they are unaffected by interventions. This leads to highly targeted interventions towards the heaviest drinkers rather than effective regulation of the alcohol market. Conclusion A sophisticated campaign by global alcohol corporations has promoted them as good corporate citizens and framed arguments with a focus on drinkers rather than the supply of alcohol. This has contributed to acceptance in the global governance arena dealing with policy development and implementation to an extent which is very different from tobacco. This approach, which obscures the contribution supply and marketing make to alcohol-related harm, has also contributed to failure by governments to adopt effective supply-side policies. © 2013 The Author, Addiction. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.


Conklin J.R.,Massey University
Nature communications | Year: 2010

Despite clear benefits of optimal arrival time on breeding grounds, migration schedules may vary with an individual bird's innate quality, non-breeding habitat or breeding destination. Here, we show that for the bar-tailed godwit (Limosa lapponica baueri), a shorebird that makes the longest known non-stop migratory flights of any bird, timing of migration for individual birds from a non-breeding site in New Zealand was strongly correlated with their specific breeding latitudes in Alaska, USA, a 16,000-18,000 km journey away. Furthermore, this variation carried over even to the southbound return migration, 6 months later, with birds returning to New Zealand in approximately the same order in which they departed. These tightly scheduled movements on a global scale suggest endogenously controlled routines, with breeding site as the primary driver of temporal variation throughout the annual cycle.

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