Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital

Woburn, MA, United States

Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital

Woburn, MA, United States

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Eisenberg B.W.,Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital | Eisenberg B.W.,Bulger Veterinary Referral Hospital | Eisenberg B.W.,Port City Veterinary Referral Hospital | Waldrop J.E.,Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital | And 5 more authors.
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association | Year: 2013

Objective: To determine risk factors for short-term recurrent urethral obstruction in cats after treatment by means of urinary catheterization and hospitalization. Design: Prospective case series. Animals: 83 client-owned cats. Procedures: Physical examination findings, laboratory abnormalities, treatment decisions, and environmental changes were evaluated as risk factors for recurrent urethral obstruction in the 30 days following hospital discharge. Results: Of the 68 cats with completed follow-up surveys, 10 had an episode of recurrent urethral obstruction. Older cats were significantly more likely to have recurrent urethral obstruction. No specific laboratory abnormalities were associated with the risk of recurrent urethral obstruction. Longer duration of catheterization was significantly associated with a decreased risk of recurrent urethral obstruction. Duration of hospitalization and volume of IV fluids delivered were not significantly associated with recurrent urethral obstruction. Increasing water availability after discharge was associated with a decreased risk of recurrent urethral obstruction. There was no association between diet and recurrent urethral obstruction. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance: Results of this study suggested that longer duration of catheterization may be associated with a lower probability of short-term recurrent urethral obstruction in male cats. Older cats were at higher risk for recurrent obstruction. Owners should be encouraged to increase water availability after discharge in cats treated for urethral obstruction to decrease the likelihood of recurrence.


Trafny D.J.,University of Pennsylvania | Freeman L.M.,Tufts University | Bulmer B.J.,Tufts University | MacGregor J.M.,Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology | Year: 2012

Objectives: In order to more fully understand degenerative mitral valve disease (DMVD) in the Norfolk terrier, we sought to characterize findings from the physical and echocardiographic examination; biochemical, biomarker, and nutritional profiles; and select environmental variables from a cohort of apparently healthy Norfolk terriers. Animals, materials and methods: Overtly healthy Norfolk terriers ≥6 yrs old were recruited by 3 different veterinary hospitals and underwent historical, physical, electrocardiographic (ECG), and 2D/color-flow Doppler echocardiographic examinations. Anterior mitral valve leaflet length, maximal thickness, area, and degree of prolapse were measured or calculated from two-dimensional images. Blood samples were obtained for serum biochemistry, serum serotonin, plasma NT-proBNP, amino acid profile, C-reactive protein, and cardiac troponin I. Results: Of the 48 dogs entered into the study, 23 (48%) had murmurs, 2 (4%) had mid-systolic clicks, 11 (23%) had ECG P pulmonale, and 41 (85%) were deemed to have echocardiographic evidence of DMVD, including 18 Norfolk terriers without a murmur. Seven (15%), 28 (58%), and 13 (27%) dogs were classified as normal (stage 0), International Small Animal Cardiac Health Council (ISACHC) stage 1a, and 1b, respectively. Mean indexed echocardiographic mitral leaflet thickness (P = 0.017), area (P = 0.0002), prolapse (P = 0.0004), and left atrial to aortic diameter (P = 0.01) were significantly different between ISACHC 0, 1a, and 1b. Conclusion: DMVD is relatively common in Norfolk terriers and echocardiographic changes consistent with mild DMVD can be seen in dogs without a heart murmur. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Ocean State Veterinary Specialists, University of Pennsylvania, Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital and Tufts University
Type: | Journal: Journal of veterinary internal medicine | Year: 2017

The coagulation status of dogs with liver disease is difficult to predict using conventional coagulation testing.To evaluate thromboelastography (TEG) results and associations with conventional coagulation results and indicators of disease severity and prognosis in dogs with chronic hepatopathies (CH).Twenty-one client-owned dogs.Dogs with CH were prospectively (10 dogs) and retrospectively (11 dogs) enrolled from 2008 to 2014. Kaolin-activated TEG was performed and compared with reference intervals by t-tests or Mann-Whitney tests. Correlation coefficients for TEG results and conventional coagulation and clinicopathologic results were determined. Significance was set at P < .05.Dogs with CH had significant increases in R (5.30 min vs 4.33 min), K (3.77 min vs 2.11 min), and LY30 (4.77% vs 0.68%) and decreased angles (55.3 vs 62.4). G value defined 9 of 21, 7 of 21, and 5 of 21 dogs as normocoagulable, hypercoagulable, and hypocoagulable, respectively. G and MA were correlated with fibrinogen (r = 0.68, 0.83), prothrombin time (PT; r = -0.51, -0.53), and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT; r = -0.50, -0.50). K was correlated with PT (r = 0.75) and protein C activity (r = -0.92). Angle was correlated with aPTT (r = -0.63). Clinical score was correlated with PT (r = 0.60), MA (r = -0.53), and R (r = -0.47). Dogs with hyperfibrinolysis (LY30 > 3.04%; 5 of 21) had significantly higher serum transaminase activities. Dogs with portal hypertension had significantly lower G, MA, and angle and prolonged, K, R, and PT.Dogs with CH have variable TEG results. Negative prognostic indicators in CH correlate with hypocoagulable parameters on TEG. Hyperfibrinolysis in dogs with CH is associated with high disease activity.


MacGregor J.M.,Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital | Rush J.E.,Tufts University | Laste N.J.,Angell Animal Medical Center | Malakoff R.L.,Angell Animal Medical Center | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology | Year: 2011

Hypothesis/Objectives: To describe the therapeutic use of pimobendan in cats, describe the patient population to which it was administered, document potential side effects and report the clinical course following administration of pimobendan in conjunction with standard heart failure therapy. It is hypothesized that cats with advanced heart disease including congestive heart failure from a variety of causes will tolerate pimobendan with a minimum of side effects when used in treatment in conjunction with a variety of other medications. Animals, materials and methods: One hundred and seventy client owned cats with naturally occurring heart disease, one hundred and sixty four of which had congestive heart failure. Medical records were reviewed and owners and referring veterinarians were contacted for follow-up data. Data collected included pimobendan dose, other medications administered concurrently, data collected at physical examination, presence or absence of heart failure, adverse effects, classification of heart disease, echocardiographic data and survival time. The data were analyzed for significance between the initial visit and any follow-up visits. Results: All cats were treated with pimobendan. The median pimobendan dose was 0.24 mg/kg q 12 h. Pimobendan was used in combination with multiple concurrent medications including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, diuretics and anti-thrombotics. Five cats (3.0%) had potential side effects associated with pimobendan. One cat (0.6%) had presumed side effects severe enough to discontinue pimobendan use. Median survival time for 164 cats with congestive heart failure after initiation of pimobendan was 151 days (range 1-870). Conclusion: Pimobendan appears to be well tolerated in cats with advanced heart disease when used with a variety of concurrent medications. Randomized controlled studies need to be performed to accurately assess whether it is efficacious for treatment of congestive heart failure in cats. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Topics in companion animal medicine | Year: 2014

Massage is gaining recognition as a beneficial modality for the treatment of many ailments due to recent scientific research in humans. We can infer that these benefits apply to dogs and cats due to their similar physiology and anatomy. Defined as the therapeutic manipulation of soft tissues, massage has many effects on muscle, the circulatory system, the autonomic nervous system, and the mind. Various techniques are employed to achieve a desired effect in the treatment of many conditions, including but not limited to, swelling and edema, critical illness and prolonged recumbency, osteoarthritis and chronic pain, and palliative and hospice care. This article reviews the above topics and encourages the practitioner to seek out expert advice on massage in the care of companion animals.


PubMed | Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of veterinary cardiology : the official journal of the European Society of Veterinary Cardiology | Year: 2011

To describe the therapeutic use of pimobendan in cats, describe the patient population to which it was administered, document potential side effects and report the clinical course following administration of pimobendan in conjunction with standard heart failure therapy. It is hypothesized that cats with advanced heart disease including congestive heart failure from a variety of causes will tolerate pimobendan with a minimum of side effects when used in treatment in conjunction with a variety of other medications.One hundred and seventy client owned cats with naturally occurring heart disease, one hundred and sixty four of which had congestive heart failure. Medical records were reviewed and owners and referring veterinarians were contacted for follow-up data. Data collected included pimobendan dose, other medications administered concurrently, data collected at physical examination, presence or absence of heart failure, adverse effects, classification of heart disease, echocardiographic data and survival time. The data were analyzed for significance between the initial visit and any follow-up visits.All cats were treated with pimobendan. The median pimobendan dose was 0.24 mg/kg q 12 h. Pimobendan was used in combination with multiple concurrent medications including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, diuretics and anti-thrombotics. Five cats (3.0%) had potential side effects associated with pimobendan. One cat (0.6%) had presumed side effects severe enough to discontinue pimobendan use. Median survival time for 164 cats with congestive heart failure after initiation of pimobendan was 151 days (range 1-870).Pimobendan appears to be well tolerated in cats with advanced heart disease when used with a variety of concurrent medications. Randomized controlled studies need to be performed to accurately assess whether it is efficacious for treatment of congestive heart failure in cats.


PubMed | Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association | Year: 2015

Hypercalcemia is uncommonly encountered in veterinary patients. When it does occur, the effects can be severe, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality if not recognized and addressed in a timely manner. Causes of hypercalcemia are varied and include pituitary-dependent and pituitary-independent causes. A diagnosis of hypercalcemia should be made based on documentation of ionized hypercalcemia. The mainstay of emergency treatment usually involves aggressive IV fluid diuresis, the use of diuretics, and, often, glucocorticoids. The use of bisphosphonates has become increasingly more common in veterinary medicine.


PubMed | Massachusetts Veterinary Referral Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association | Year: 2013

To determine risk factors for short-term recurrent urethral obstruction in cats after treatment by means of urinary catheterization and hospitalization.Prospective case series.83 client-owned cats.Physical examination findings, laboratory abnormalities, treatment decisions, and environmental changes were evaluated as risk factors for recurrent urethral obstruction in the 30 days following hospital discharge.Of the 68 cats with completed follow-up surveys, 10 had an episode of recurrent urethral obstruction. Older cats were significantly more likely to have recurrent urethral obstruction. No specific laboratory abnormalities were associated with the risk of recurrent urethral obstruction. Longer duration of catheterization was significantly associated with a decreased risk of recurrent urethral obstruction. Duration of hospitalization and volume of IV fluids delivered were not significantly associated with recurrent urethral obstruction. Increasing water availability after discharge was associated with a decreased risk of recurrent urethral obstruction. There was no association between diet and recurrent urethral obstruction.Results of this study suggested that longer duration of catheterization may be associated with a lower probability of short-term recurrent urethral obstruction in male cats. Older cats were at higher risk for recurrent obstruction. Owners should be encouraged to increase water availability after discharge in cats treated for urethral obstruction to decrease the likelihood of recurrence.

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