Mass Spectrometry Group

Cambridge, United Kingdom

Mass Spectrometry Group

Cambridge, United Kingdom

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Cruz G.C.N.,University of Brasilia | Garcia L.,Mass Spectrometry Group | Silva A.J.,University of Brasilia | Barbosa J.A.R.G.,Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) | And 3 more authors.
Apidologie | Year: 2011

The major royal jelly protein 1 (MRJP1) is the main glycoprotein in honey bee royal jelly. In brain tissues, MRJP1 is found in intercellular spaces and associated to cytoskeleton within cells. MRJP1 must be involved in multiple biological functions, yet there is a lack of structural information on the protein. MRJP1 was herein purified from royal jelly and characterized through electrophoresis and mass spectrometry as the same protein found in cerebral tissue. Unfolding curves obtained by circular dichroism analyses strongly suggest its high stability under different pHs. However, calcium ions made MRJP1 susceptible to temperature and pH effects. In the presence of 2 mM calcium, very high stabilities were achieved at pH 6.0 and 7.0 with δG 25 over 62 kJ mol -1. Overall, the present results represent a valuable effort aimed at the structural characterization of MRJP1, representing an essential step toward the determination of its roles in honey bee neural processes. © The Author(s) 2011.


Staples C.J.,University of Sheffield | Myers K.N.,University of Sheffield | Beveridge R.D.D.,University of Sheffield | Patil A.A.,University of Sheffield | And 9 more authors.
Journal of Cell Science | Year: 2014

Here, we identify coiled-coil domain-containing protein 13 (Ccdc13) in a genome-wide RNA interference screen for regulators of genome stability. We establish that Ccdc13 is a newly identified centriolar satellite protein that interacts with PCM1, Cep290 and pericentrin and prevents the accumulation of DNA damage during mitotic transit. Depletion of Ccdc13 results in the loss of microtubule organisation in a manner similar to PCM1 and Cep290 depletion, although Ccdc13 is not required for satellite integrity. We show that microtubule regrowth is enhanced in Ccdc13-depleted cells, but slowed in cells that overexpress Ccdc13. Furthermore, in serumstarved cells, Ccdc13 localises to the basal body, is required for primary cilia formation and promotes the localisation of the ciliopathy protein BBS4 to both centriolar satellites and cilia. These data highlight the emerging link between DNA damage response factors, centriolar and peri-centriolar satellites and ciliaassociated proteins and implicate Ccdc13 as a centriolar satellite protein that functions to promote both genome stability and cilia formation. © 2014.


PubMed | University of Sheffield, Cancer Research UK Research Institute, Mass Spectrometry Group, CR UK London Research Institute and DNA Response
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of cell science | Year: 2014

Here, we identify coiled-coil domain-containing protein 13 (Ccdc13) in a genome-wide RNA interference screen for regulators of genome stability. We establish that Ccdc13 is a newly identified centriolar satellite protein that interacts with PCM1, Cep290 and pericentrin and prevents the accumulation of DNA damage during mitotic transit. Depletion of Ccdc13 results in the loss of microtubule organisation in a manner similar to PCM1 and Cep290 depletion, although Ccdc13 is not required for satellite integrity. We show that microtubule regrowth is enhanced in Ccdc13-depleted cells, but slowed in cells that overexpress Ccdc13. Furthermore, in serum-starved cells, Ccdc13 localises to the basal body, is required for primary cilia formation and promotes the localisation of the ciliopathy protein BBS4 to both centriolar satellites and cilia. These data highlight the emerging link between DNA damage response factors, centriolar and peri-centriolar satellites and cilia-associated proteins and implicate Ccdc13 as a centriolar satellite protein that functions to promote both genome stability and cilia formation.


Hernandez L.G.,Mass Spectrometry Group | Hernandez L.G.,University of Brasilia | Lu B.,Scripps Research Institute | Da Cruz G.C.N.,University of Brasilia | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Proteome Research | Year: 2012

A large-scale mapping of the worker honeybee brain proteome was achieved by MudPIT. We identified 2742 proteins from forager and nurse honeybee brain samples; 17% of the total proteins were found to be differentially expressed by spectral count sampling statistics and a G-test. Sequences were compared with the EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG) catalog set using BLASTX and then categorized into the major KOG categories of most similar sequences. According to this categorization, nurse brain showed increased expression of proteins implicated in translation, ribosomal structure, and biogenesis (14.5%) compared with forager (1.8%). Experienced foragers overexpressed proteins involved in energy production and conversion, showing an extensive difference in this set of proteins (17%) in relation to the nurse subcaste (0.6%). Examples of proteins selectively expressed in each subcaste were analyzed. A comparison between these MudPIT experiments and previous 2-DE experiments revealed nine coincident proteins differentially expressed in both methodologies. © 2011 American Chemical Society.


PubMed | Mass Spectrometry Group
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Journal of proteome research | Year: 2012

A large-scale mapping of the worker honeybee brain proteome was achieved by MudPIT. We identified 2742 proteins from forager and nurse honeybee brain samples; 17% of the total proteins were found to be differentially expressed by spectral count sampling statistics and a G-test. Sequences were compared with the EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG) catalog set using BLASTX and then categorized into the major KOG categories of most similar sequences. According to this categorization, nurse brain showed increased expression of proteins implicated in translation, ribosomal structure, and biogenesis (14.5%) compared with forager (1.8%). Experienced foragers overexpressed proteins involved in energy production and conversion, showing an extensive difference in this set of proteins (17%) in relation to the nurse subcaste (0.6%). Examples of proteins selectively expressed in each subcaste were analyzed. A comparison between these MudPIT experiments and previous 2-DE experiments revealed nine coincident proteins differentially expressed in both methodologies.


PubMed | University of Sheffield, University of Oxford and Mass Spectrometry Group
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Cell reports | Year: 2016

Through an RNAi-based screen for previously uncharacterized regulators of genome stability, wehave identified the human protein C5orf45 as animportant factor in preventing the accumulation of DNA damage in human cells. Here, we functionallycharacterize C5orf45 as a binding partner of the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) damage-sensing complex. Hence, we rename C5orf45 as MRNIP forMRN-interacting protein (MRNIP). We find thatMRNIP is rapidly recruited to sites of DNA damage. Cells depleted of MRNIP display impaired chromatin loading of the MRN complex, resulting in reduced DNA end resection and defective ATM-mediated DNA damage signaling, a reduced ability to repair DNA breaks, and radiation sensitivity. Finally, we show that MRNIP phosphorylation on serine 115 leads to its nuclear localization, and this modification is required for MRNIPs role in promoting genome stability. Collectively, these data reveal that MRNIP is an important component of the human DNA damage response.


PubMed | University of Sheffield and Mass Spectrometry Group
Type: | Journal: Scientific reports | Year: 2016

It was recently discovered that vertebrate genomes contain multiple endogenised nucleotide sequences derived from the non-retroviral RNA bornavirus. Strikingly, some of these elements have been evolutionary maintained as open reading frames in host genomes for over 40 million years, suggesting that some endogenised bornavirus-derived elements (EBL) might encode functional proteins. EBLN1 is one such element established through endogenisation of the bornavirus N gene (BDV N). Here, we functionally characterise human EBLN1 as a novel regulator of genome stability. Cells depleted of human EBLN1 accumulate DNA damage both under non-stressed conditions and following exogenously induced DNA damage. EBLN1-depleted cells also exhibit cell cycle abnormalities and defects in microtubule organisation as well as premature centrosome splitting, which we attribute in part, to improper localisation of the nuclear envelope protein TPR. Our data therefore reveal that human EBLN1 possesses important cellular functions within human cells, and suggest that other EBLs present within vertebrate genomes may also possess important cellular functions.

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