MARINTEK AS

Trondheim, Norway

MARINTEK AS

Trondheim, Norway

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | November 14, 2016
Site: www.greencarcongress.com

« Samsung Electronics to acquire HARMAN for ~$8B, accelerating growth in automotive and connected technologies | Main | Siemens to acquire Mentor Graphics for $4.5B » Rolls-Royce and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd have formed a strategic partnership to design, to test and to validate the first generation of remote and autonomous ships. The new partnership will combine and integrate the two companies’ unique expertise to make such vessels a commercial reality. (Earlier post.) Rolls-Royce is pioneering the development of remote-controlled and autonomous ships and believes a remote-controlled ship will be in commercial use by the end of the decade. The company is applying technology, skills and experience from across its businesses to this development. VTT has deep knowledge of ship simulation and extensive expertise in the development and management of safety-critical and complex systems in demanding environments such as nuclear safety. VTT combines physical tests such as model and tank testing, with digital technologies, such as data analytics and computer visualisation. VTT will also use field research to incorporate human factors into safe ship design. As a result of working with the Finnish telecommunications sector, VTT has extensive experience of working with 5G mobile phone technology and wi-fi mesh networks. VTT has the first 5G test network in Finland. Working with VTT will allow Rolls-Royce to assess the performance of remote and autonomous designs through the use of both traditional model tank tests and digital simulation, allowing the company to develop functional, safe and reliable prototypes. Rolls-Royce has experience in secure data analytics across civil aerospace, defence, nuclear power and marine; coupled with its ship intelligence capabilities, design, propulsion and machinery expertise, this base means it is ideally placed to take the lead in defining the future of shipping, in collaboration with industry, academia and Government. Rolls-Royce is leading the Advanced Autonomous Waterborne Applications Initiative (AAWA). Funded by Tekes (Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation), AAWA brings together universities, ship designers, equipment manufacturers, and classification societies to explore the economic, social, legal, regulatory and technological factors which need to be addressed to make autonomous ships a reality. It combines the expertise of some of Finland’s top academic researchers from Tampere University of Technology; VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd; Åbo Akademi University; Aalto University; the University of Turku; and leading members of the maritime cluster including Rolls-Royce, NAPA, Deltamarin, DNV GL and Inmarsat. Rolls-Royce is also a member of the Norwegian Forum for Autonomous Ships (NFAS) which has the backing of the Norwegian Maritime Administration, The Norwegian Coastal Administration, the Federation of Norwegian Industries and MARINTEK. Its objectives are to strengthen the cooperation between users, researchers, authorities and others that are interested in autonomous ships and their use; contribute to the development of common Norwegian strategies for development and use of autonomous ships and co-operate with other international and national bodies interested in autonomous shipping. Rolls-Royce is also a founding member of the Finnish ecosystem for autonomous marine transport (DIMECC). Supported by the Finnish Marine Industries Association, the Ministry of Transport and Communications, Tekes (the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation) and leading companies including Rolls-Royce, Cargotec, Ericsson, Meyer Turku, Tieto, and Wärtsilä, it aims to create the world’s first autonomous marine transport system in the Baltic Sea.


News Article | November 14, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Rolls-Royce and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd have announced a strategic partnership to design, test and validate the first generation of remote and autonomous ships. The new partnership will combine and integrate the two company's unique expertise to make such vessels a commercial reality. Rolls-Royce is pioneering the development of remote controlled and autonomous ships and believes a remote controlled ship will be in commercial use by the end of the decade. The company is applying technology, skills and experience from across its businesses to this development. VTT has deep knowledge of ship simulation and extensive expertise in the development and management of safety-critical and complex systems in demanding environments such as nuclear safety. They combine physical tests such as model and tank testing, with digital technologies, such as data analytics and computer visualisation. They will also use field research to incorporate human factors into safe ship design. As a result of working with the Finnish telecommunications sector, VTT has extensive experience of working with 5G mobile phone technology and wi-fi mesh networks. VTT has the first 5G test network in Finland. Working with VTT will allow Rolls-Royce to assess the performance of remote and autonomous designs through the use of both traditional model tank tests and digital simulation, allowing the company to develop functional, safe and reliable prototypes. Karno Tenovuo, Rolls-Royce, Vice President Ship Intelligence, said: "Remotely operated ships are a key development project for Rolls-Royce Marine, and VTT is a reliable and innovative partner for the development of a smart ship concept. This collaboration is a natural continuation of the earlier User Experience for Complex systems (UXUS) project, where we developed totally new bridge and remote control systems for shipping." Erja Turunen, Executive Vice President at VTT, said: "Rolls-Royce is a pioneer in remotely controlled and autonomous shipping. Our collaboration strengthens the way we can integrate and leverage VTT's expertise in simulation and safety validation, including the industrial Internet of Things, to develop new products and in the future, enable us to develop new solutions for new areas of application as well." Rolls-Royce is pioneering the development of remote controlled and autonomous ships, applying technology, skills and experience from across its businesses with the ambition of seeing a remote controlled ship in commercial use by the end of the decade. Rolls-Royce's experience in secure data analytics across civil aerospace, defence, nuclear power and marine; coupled with its ship intelligence capabilities, design, propulsion and machinery expertise means it is ideally placed to take the lead in defining the future of shipping, in collaboration with industry, academia and Government. Rolls-Royce is leading the Advanced Autonomous Waterborne Applications Initiative (AAWA). Funded by Tekes (Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation), AAWA brings together universities, ship designers, equipment manufacturers, and classification societies to explore the economic, social, legal, regulatory and technological factors which need to be addressed to make autonomous ships a reality. It combines the expertise of some of Finland's top academic researchers from Tampere University of Technology; VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd; Åbo Akademi University; Aalto University; the University of Turku; and leading members of the maritime cluster including Rolls-Royce, NAPA, Deltamarin, DNV GL and Inmarsat. Rolls-Royce is also a member of the Norwegian Forum for Autonomous Ships (NFAS) which has the backing of the Norwegian Maritime Administration, The Norwegian Coastal Administration, the Federation of Norwegian Industries and MARINTEK. Its objectives are to strengthen the cooperation between users, researchers, authorities and others that are interested in autonomous ships and their use; contribute to the development of common Norwegian strategies for development and use of autonomous ships and co-operate with other international and national bodies interested in autonomous shipping. Rolls-Royce is a founder member of the Finnish ecosystem for autonomous marine transport (DIMECC). Supported by the Finnish Marine Industries Association, the Ministry of Transport and Communications, Tekes - the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation and leading companies including: Rolls-Royce, Cargotec, Ericsson, Meyer Turku, Tieto, and Wärtsilä it aims to create the world's first autonomous marine transport system in the Baltic Sea. More information on VTT's ship model and propulsion device test facilities: http://www. Ship Intelligence press photos are available for download at: https:/ For further information, please contact: Erja Turunen Executive Vice President VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd +358 50 380 9671, erja.turunen@vtt.fi 1. Rolls-Royce's vision is to be the market-leader in high performance power systems where our engineering expertise, global reach and deep industry knowledge deliver outstanding customer relationships and solutions. We operate across five businesses: Civil Aerospace, Defence Aerospace, Marine, Nuclear and Power Systems. 2. Rolls-Royce has customers in more than 120 countries, comprising more than 400 airlines and leasing customers, 160 armed forces, 4,000 marine customers including 70 navies, and more than 5,000 power and nuclear customers. 3. We have three common themes across all our businesses: 4. Annual underlying revenue was £13.4 billion in 2015, around half of which came from the provision of aftermarket services. The firm and announced order book stood at £76.4 billion at the end of 2015. 5. In 2015, Rolls-Royce invested £1.2 billion on research and development. We also support a global network of 31 University Technology Centres, which position Rolls-Royce engineers at the forefront of scientific research. 6. Rolls-Royce employs over 50,000 people in more than 46 countries. Nearly 15,700 of these are engineers. 7. The Group has a strong commitment to apprentice and graduate recruitment and to further developing employee skills. In 2015 we employed 228 graduates and 277 apprentices through our worldwide training programmes. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd is the leading research and technology company in the Nordic countries. We use our research and knowledge to provide expert services for our domestic and international customers and partners, and for both private and public sectors. We use 4,000,000 hours of brainpower a year to develop new technological solutions. VTT in social media: Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube and Twitter @VTTFinland.


Aksnes V.,MARINTEK AS | Nybo T.,Statoil | Lie H.,MARINTEK AS
Proceedings of the International Conference on Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering - OMAE | Year: 2013

The floating storage unit Navion Saga at the Volve field in the North Sea suffered from two mooring line breaks in steel wire ropes in 2011. Investigations of the broken ropes indicated that a possible failure mechanism could be high stresses near the wire socket induced by large bending moments in leeward mooring lines. The scope of the current study has been to make a numerical model capable of capturing such behaviour of the steel wire rope and to check if the minimum bending radius could be as low as the rope's specified minimum bending radius. The numerical model has revealed a possible failure mechanism. The connecting link plate between the upper chain segment and the upper wire segment lies initially on the seabed. When lifted off the seabed, the link plate and the wire socket will fall to the seabed at a higher speed than the upper wire segment. A transverse wave in mooring line plane propagating towards fair-lead is generated when the wire socket hits the seabed. The wave leads to large curvature in the wire near the socket. Sensitivity studies of the governing parameters have been performed to assess the uncertainties of the numerical model. A modified system is presented and it is shown that the phenomenon which is likely to have caused failure in the original system will not occur for the modified one. Copyright © 2013 by ASME.


Gaidai O.,MARINTEK AS | Ye N.,MARINTEK AS | Jin J.,ExxonMobil | Reid D.,ExxonMobil | Maincon P.,Sintef
Proceedings of the International Offshore and Polar Engineering Conference | Year: 2015

Dynamic umbilicals are usually exposed to cyclic environmental loads due to waves, motions of the host vessel, and current induced vibrations. These cyclic loads drive the fatigue design of functional components such as armor wires, steel tubes and conductor wires in an umbilical cross section. Fatigue assessment of umbilical components involves Finite Element Method (FEM) modelling both globally and locally. The "global" model is used to predict dynamic responses of an umbilical with equivalent cross-sectional properties in waves and currents. Stress calculation in umbilical components requires a special "local" FEM tool such as Uflex2d to correctly capture the interaction mechanics among the components within the cross-section. This paper compares three methods for the combination of global and local analysis in order to obtain fatigue estimates. First method can be regarded as exact one and is used to benchmark other two, which are approximate. Copyright © 2015 by the International Society of Offshore and Polar Engineers (ISOPE).


Ushakov S.,Sudan University of Science and Technology | Valland H.,Sudan University of Science and Technology | Nielsen Jo.B.,MARINTEK AS | Hennie E.,MARINTEK AS
Fuel Processing Technology | Year: 2014

Particle emission characteristics were studied from heavy-duty diesel engine operating on fuels with sulfur levels relevant to marine operation, i.e. 0.05% S and 3% S respectively. Effects of primary dilution temperature (PDT) and primary dilution ratio (PDR) were investigated together with effect of filter media and time of filter conditioning. PDT increase was found slowing down nucleation rate due to increase of saturation vapor pressures of volatile species. In turn, increasing PDR reduces partial pressure of exhaust species and hence weakens both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. All these effects are amplified by high sulfur content in marine fuels which increases available amount of nucleation-prone vapor-phase semivolatile compounds. At the same time, water condensation artifact was observed at PDR = 3. No filter type was found to be overwhelmingly superior as certain positive and/or negative measurement artifacts are inherently associated with all filter materials. The filter conditioning time was also found to cause substantial PM mass variation, as control over VOC take up from (or lost to) laboratory air and hydration of sulfuric acid is required. The standard 24 hour conditioning time was found insufficient to reach complete PM mass equilibrium, so longer time is required when measuring from high-sulfur fuels. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Ushakov S.,Sudan University of Science and Technology | Valland H.,Sudan University of Science and Technology | Nielsen J.B.,MARINTEK AS | Hennie E.,MARINTEK AS
Fuel Processing Technology | Year: 2013

Particulate matter (PM) emission characteristics of a four-stroke diesel engine were investigated while operating on low-sulfur marine gas oil. PM size distributions appeared to be unimodal (accumulation mode) with fairly constant count median diameter (CMD) of 55-65 nm for all test modes at maximum engine speed. The slightly bigger CMD of around 76 nm for unimodal particle size distributions at 1080 rpm at medium- and high-load conditions was observed. The bimodal size distribution was registered only at very low load with nuclei CMD being below 15 nm, accumulation CMD of around 82 nm and percentage of nanoparticles of around 65%. The study of primary dilution air temperature (PDT) effect revealed a significant reduction in total particle number for all operating conditions when PDT was increased from 30°C to 400°C. This also had an effect on particle CMD values and is believed to be due to evaporation of sulfuric acid with bound water and certain organic fractions that were formed during dilution process (at PDT = 30°C). At very low load intermediate speed conditions, the heating of dilution air had a very little effect on the nucleation mode, which could suggest that it primarily consists of heavy hydrocarbons associated with lubrication oil. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Gaidai O.,MARINTEK AS | Storhaug G.,DNV GL | Naess A.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology
11th International Symposium on Practical Design of Ships and Other Floating Structures, PRADS 2010 | Year: 2010

This paper describes a method for prediction of extreme stresses measured in deck amidships of a container vessel during operation in harsh weather. The nonlinear structural response known as "whipping" is studied. It refers to transient vibration response of the hull girder due to wave impacts mainly in the bow area. For the safety of crew and cargo it is essential to assess all aspects of the wave loading to ensure that ships are built to endure such extreme storm events. Due to non-stationarity and complicated nonlinearities of both the waves and the ship response, there are no reliable numerical simulation tools available for predicting the extreme response including whipping. Moreover, lab tests may not fully reproduce the critical conditions that may occur in reality. Therefore measurements on real ships during their voyages in harsh weather provide unique insight into statistics of the measured responses. The aim of the work is to develop a specific method which makes it possible to extract the necessary information about the extreme response from relatively short time series. The method proposed in this paper opens up for the possibility to predict simply and efficiently both short-term and long-term extreme response statistics. © 2010 COPPE/UFRJ.


Gaidai O.,MARINTEK AS | Storhaug G.,DNV GL | Naess A.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology
11th International Symposium on Practical Design of Ships and Other Floating Structures, PRADS 2010 | Year: 2010

Paper describes a method for prediction of extreme ship roll angles occurring during sailing in harsh weather. Rolling is coupled with other ship motions and exhibits highly nonlinear behavior. Ship capsizing probability is an extremely important issue in the ship design. Due to nonstationarity and complicated nonlinearities of both waves and ship motions, it is a considerable challenge to model such a phenomenon. In case of extreme motions role of nonlinearities dramatically increases, activating effects second and higher order. Moreover lab tests may also be questioned because of the scaling and the choice of sea state. Therefore data measured on the actual ships during their voyages in harsh weather provides a unique insight into statistics of ship motions. The aim of the work is to develop specific methods which make possible to extract the necessary information about the extreme response from relatively short time history. The method proposed in this paper opens up the possibility to predict simply and efficiently both short-term and long-term extreme response statistics. © 2010 COPPE/UFRJ.


Ushakov S.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Valland H.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Nielsen J.B.,MARINTEK AS | Hennie E.,MARINTEK AS
RINA, Royal Institution of Naval Architects - International Maritime Conference 2012, Pacific 2012 | Year: 2012

Particulate matter (PM) emissions from diesel engines are of major concern due to their adverse health effects. While PM emissions from the automotive sector have been regulated for decades, there have been no direct regulations on PM from sea-going vessels. The engines used in maritime sector are significantly different from automotive engines not only regarding their size, but also in regard to power output and fuels used. This study presents results from exhaust particle emission measurements from two different medium-speed turbocharged marine diesel engines: 2-stroke Wätrsilä WX28B and 4-stroke Rolls-Royce KR3. The engines were tested according to ISO 8178-4 E2 and E3 cycles, using two typical marine fuels: marine gas oil (MGO) and heavy fuel oil (HFO). The size distributions were obtained using Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI), operated simultaneously. The obtained number distributions for 2-stroke engine are mainly bimodal with the pronounced nucleation mode, representing mainly non-volatile species originating from lubrication oil, and found below 20 nm and accumulation mode at 20-60 nm, referred to carbonaceous agglomerates, while for 4-stroke engine only accumulation mode was observed, and appeared to be insensitive to changes in load conditions. Additionally, results revealed a surprisingly good agreement both in total particle number and mean count median diameter values between 4-stroke Rolls-Royce KR3 and 4-stroke heavy-duty diesel engine for MGO fuel, while results from a 2-stroke Wätrsilä WX28B engine were very different.


Naess A.,Norwegian University of Science and Technology | Stansberg C.T.,MARINTEK AS | Batsevych O.,Kongsberg Maritime
Journal of Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering | Year: 2011

The paper presents a study of the extreme value statistics related to measurements on a scale model of a large tension leg platform (TLP) subjected to random waves in a wave basin. Extensive model tests were carried out in three irregular sea states. Time series of the motion responses and tether tension were recorded for a total of 18 three hour tests (full scale). In this paper we discuss the statistics of the measured tether tension. The focus is on a comparison of two alternative methods for the prediction of extreme tether tension from finite time series records. One method is based on expressing the extreme value distribution in terms of the average upcrossing rate (AUR). The other is a novel method that can account for statistical dependence in the recorded time series by utilizing a cascade of conditioning approximations obtained by defining the average conditional exceedance rates (ACER). Both methods rely on introducing a specific parametric form for the tail part of the extreme value distribution. This is combined with an optimization procedure to determine the parameters involved, which allows prediction of various extreme response levels. © 2012 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Loading MARINTEK AS collaborators
Loading MARINTEK AS collaborators