Marine Stewardship Council. Marine House

Snow Hill, United Kingdom

Marine Stewardship Council. Marine House

Snow Hill, United Kingdom
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Rosenberg A.A.,Center for Science and Democracy Union of Concerned Scientists 2 Brattle Square Cambridge 02138 United States | Kleisner K.M.,Environmental Defense Fund 18 Tremont St. | Afflerbach J.,National Center for Ecological Analysis And Synthesis | Anderson S.C.,University of Washington | And 17 more authors.
Conservation Letters | Year: 2017

The exploitation status of marine fisheries stocks worldwide is of critical importance for food security, ecosystem conservation, and fishery sustainability. Applying a suite of data-limited methods to global catch data, combined through an ensemble modeling approach, we provide quantitative estimates of exploitation status for 785 fish stocks. Fifty-six percent (439 stocks) are below BMSY and of these, 261 are estimated to be below 80% of the BMSY level. While the 178 stocks above 80% of BMSY are conventionally considered "fully exploited," stocks staying at this level for many years, forego substantial yield. Our results enable managers to consider more detailed information than simply a categorization of stocks as "fully" or "over" exploited. Our approach is reproducible, allows consistent application to a broad range of stocks, and can be easily updated as new data become available. Applied on an ongoing basis, this approach can provide critical, more detailed information for resource management for more exploited fish stocks than currently available. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Agnew D.J.,Marine Stewardship Council. Marine House | Gutierrez N.L.,Marine Stewardship Council. Marine House | Stern-Pirlot A.,Marine Stewardship Council. Marine House | Smith A.D.M.,CSIRO | And 2 more authors.
Marine Policy | Year: 2013

In a recent paper, Froese and Proelss [1] contend that 31% of stocks targeted by Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certified fisheries are overfished and subject to ongoing overfishing and a further 8% are either overfished or subject to overfishing. Their results are derived using a definition of 'overfished' that is not consistent with internationally accepted definitions and interpretations. In addition, the authors used unrealistic estimates of biomass that produce Maximum Sustainable Yields (BMSY) obtained through methods that are inconsistent with the approach used by the management agencies and scientific advisory bodies responsible for the stocks in question. Analyses such as that published by Froese and Proelss are an important part of the external, independent scrutiny of the programme that MSC welcomes. However there are a number of serious flaws in their analysis, data and resulting conclusions that this response seeks to correct. Using data for 45 stocks exploited by MSC certified fisheries (>60% of total fisheries in the programme and >80% of total certified catch), internationally accepted methods for determining MSY reference points, and internationally accepted definitions of the terms 'overfished' and 'overfishing', no stocks exploited by MSC certified fisheries can be defined as overfished (below their limit reference points). © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

Loading Marine Stewardship Council. Marine House collaborators
Loading Marine Stewardship Council. Marine House collaborators