Marine Force

Largo, FL, United States

Marine Force

Largo, FL, United States
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Chretien J.-P.,Marine Force | Yingst S.L.,1st Area Medical Laboratory | Thompson D.,George Mason University
Biosecurity and Bioterrorism | Year: 2010

The government of Afghanistan, with international partners and donors, has achieved substantial public health improvements during the past 8 years. But a critical gap remains: capacities to detect and respond to disease outbreaks that could constitute a public health emergency of international concern, as required by the International Health Regulations (IHR). The Afghan Ministry of Public Health seeks to build these capacities, but conflict and scarcity of resources hinder public health surveillance and response, diagnostic laboratory and clinical management capacity is limited, and massive international population movements could permit outbreaks to cross international borders. Several diseases covered by the IHR, such as polio, are endemic in Afghanistan, and risk of novel disease emergence may be elevated in some areas. The security forces of the United States and other countries with military presence in Afghanistan are potential partners for the government of Afghanistan in strengthening the public health capacity. They could extend specialized disease surveillance and response capabilities to the Afghan military and civilian sectors and could integrate surveillance and response capacity building into ongoing development programs, especially in insecure areas. The World Health Organization could provide the forum for coordinating military and civilian contributions to public health capacity strengthening in Afghanistan and could help ensure that international health sector development efforts address Afghan public health priorities in addition to IHR requirements. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Booth-Kewley S.,Naval Health Research Center | Schmied E.A.,Naval Health Research Center | Highfill-McRoy R.M.,Naval Health Research Center | Sander T.C.,U.S. Army | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation | Year: 2014

Purpose: Research suggests the importance of psychosocial factors in recovery from musculoskeletal injuries. The objective of this study was to identify predictors of recovery among U.S. Marines who had musculoskeletal injuries of the back, knee, or shoulder. Methods A sample of 134 participants was assessed at baseline and followed for 1 year to determine outcome information. Results: The strongest predictor of injury recovery at the 1-year follow-up was recovery expectations. In a multivariate logistic model with key demographic and psychosocial factors controlled, individuals who had high recovery expectations at baseline were over five times as likely to be recovered at follow-up as individuals who had low expectations (OR = 5.18, p<.01). Conclusions: This finding is consistent with a large body of research that has linked recovery expectations with better recovery outcomes in patients with musculoskeletal injuries as well as with research linking recovery expectations with better outcomes across a wide range of medical conditions. Applied to military populations, interventions designed to modify recovery expectations may have the potential to improve rates of return to duty and to reduce rates of disability discharge. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York (outside the USA).


Harwood J.L.,Ohio State University | LaVan J.T.,Naval Aerospace Medical Institute | Brand II G.J.,Marine Force
Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness | Year: 2013

Background: The USS George Washington (GW) and the USS Ronald Reagan (RR), 2 US Navy aircraft carriers, experienced almost simultaneous outbreaks of novel H1N1 influenza A in the summer of 2009. We compared the respective epidemic control measures taken and subsequent lessons learned. Methods: Data were collated from both outbreaks to assess various elements including attack rate, isolation/quarantine protocols, and treatment methods. The respective duration of each outbreak was compared with survival curve analysis. The number of personnel affected in each outbreak was compared using χ2 analysis. Results: Differences were found in the protocols used on the 2 ships. The GW treated about two-thirds of the patients with oseltamivir through day 14 and quarantined all patients meeting case definition throughout the outbreak. Face masks were used throughout. The RR used oseltamivir and quarantined many fewer patients (through days 5 and 3, respectively). No face masks were used after day 5. The outbreaks were similar in duration (GW = 25 days, RR = 27 days, P =.38), but the RR had significantly more cases (n = 253 vs 142, P <.0001). A portion of each group had samples that were confirmed H1N1 by polymerase chain reaction. Conclusions: GW's protocol, including aggressive oseltamivir treatment of two-thirds of the cases and quarantine throughout the duration decreased the overall number of personnel affected, likely reducing the overall control reproduction number. Both outbreaks were similar in duration. Even though the GW expended significantly more resources than the RR, if the 2009 pandemic H1N1 strain had been as clinically severe as the 1918 pandemic, a more stringent treatment protocol may have been the only way to prevent significant operational impact.(Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2013;7:29-35) Copyright © Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc. 2013.


Bianco M.,Marine Force | Koss R.,IUCN IPS and Dalton Koss HQ | Zischka K.,Marine Force
Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems | Year: 2016

Young marine conservation leaders can create and mobilize change when they are inspired, empowered and actively involved in decision-making processes. This paper provides a journey overview of the opportunities, challenges and commitments for young conservation leader empowerment within the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and its Commissions to create change. Young conservation leadership contribution to the development and delivery of the 2014 IUCN World Parks Congress highlights the drive by this cohort to inspire and mobilize change. Global marine conservation initiatives being led by transformative young leaders in partnership with senior leaders with the IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas Young Professionals (WCPA YP) group and the recently established IUCN WCPA Young Professionals Marine Task Force are actioning change. This paper highlights a critical need for the global conservation sector to invest in current and emerging young conservation leaders for creating change. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Johnson L.A.,Marine Force | Johnson R.L.,Marine Force | Portier R.-B.,Marine Force
Journal of Emergency Medicine | Year: 2013

Background: A growing number of novel substances have been abused as recreational drugs by young people in the United States (US), Europe, and Australia. Called "legal highs," these substances range from plant-based to completely synthetic compounds. Spice, Salvia, mephedrone, methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and other cathinone derivatives have psychotropic effects and are marketed for recreational use through exploitation of inadequacies in existing controlled substance laws. Objectives: This article reviews available literature on the most common "legal highs" as well as discussing the scientific basis for the legal difficulties in controlling trafficking in these novel substances. Conclusions: "Legal highs" continue to increase in use in the US, Europe, and Australia. These substances are powerful, can mimic effects of more traditional drugs of abuse, and are intentionally manufactured to circumvent existing controlled substance laws. As controlled substance legislation may be inadequate in the face of the quickly evolving legal highs, physicians are likely to see an increase in the prevalence of legal highs.


Johnson L.A.,Marine Force | Johnson R.L.,Marine Force | Alfonzo C.,Naval Aerospace Medical Institute
Military Medicine | Year: 2011

Spice, an herbal mixture containing synthetic cannabinoids, is a legal drug increasingly abused by adolescents and young adults for its narcotic-like effects. A paucity of English language literature exists on the clinical effects of Spice use. A case report of substance-induced psychosis and a summary of available literature follows later.


Trademark
Marine Force | Date: 2014-10-07

diesel oil, engine oil, fuel oil, gun oil, gear oil, motor oil, lubricating oil, lubricating and general purposes greases, gear oil. on-line retail store services featuring motor oil, oil additives, fuel treatments, outboard engine oil, boat care products, grease, hub oil, fishing reel maintenance products, gun oil, and marine products.


Trademark
Marine Force | Date: 2014-10-07

diesel oil, engine oil, fuel oil, gun oil, gear oil, motor oil, lubricating oil, lubricating and general purposes greases, gear oil. on-line retail store services featuring motor oil, oil additives, fuel treatments, outboard engine oil, boat care products, grease, hub oil, fishing reel maintenance products, gun oil, and marine products.


PubMed | Juva Skin and Laser Center, U.S. Navy and Marine Force
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Cutis | Year: 2016

Identifying the etiology of a cutaneous eruption in the setting of an acute cluster outbreak is of utmost importance due to the inherent potential public health impact. The differential diagnosis ranges from innocuous arthropod bites to more concerning causes such as infection, medication reaction, and environmental exposure. We report the simultaneous presentation of 15 US Marines who presented with numerous discrete papular skin eruptions. Subsequent thorough patient evaluation and history, literature review, immunization status reconciliation, entomological assessment, site survey, and skin biopsy were performed. This case series is one of the largest reported to date of a cluster outbreak of a papular dermatitis secondary to bites from thrips (ie, insects of the order Thysanoptera).

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