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Childers R.,Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton | Tolentino J.C.,Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton | Leasiolagi J.,Reconnaissance Battalion | Wiley N.,Marine Force | And 3 more authors.
Military Medicine | Year: 2011

We hypothesize that an anecdotally observed increase in tourniquet breakage and decrease in efficacy may be secondary to environmental exposure during military deployment. This was a study comparing efficacy and breakage of 166 Afghanistan-exposed tourniquets to 166 unexposed tourniquets. Afghanistan exposure was defined as tourniquet carriage by field staff in the operational environment for approximately 6 months. In a controlled environment in the United States, a previously exposed tourniquet was tested on one thigh of each subject, while an unexposed tourniquet was tested on the opposite thigh. We recorded tourniquet efficacy (absence of distal pedal pulse for at least 30 seconds), breakage, and the number of turns required to stop the distal pedal pulse. A Wilcoxon sign-rank test was used to test differences between exposed and unexposed tourniquets. Tourniquets exposed to the environment broke more often (14/166 versus 0/166) and had decreased efficacy (63% versus 91% p < 0.001). Three turns were required for most tourniquets to be efficacious. Environmental exposure of military tourniquets is associated with decreased efficacy and increased breakage. In most cases, tourniquets require three turns to stop the distal lower extremity pulse. © Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S. All rights reserved. Source


Brender J.D.,Texas A&M University | Weyer P.J.,University of Iowa | Romitti P.A.,University of Iowa | Mohanty B.P.,Texas A&M University | And 12 more authors.
Environmental Health Perspectives | Year: 2013

Background: Previous studies of prenatal exposure to drinking-water nitrate and birth defects in offspring have not accounted for water consumption patterns or potential interaction with nitrosatable drugs. Objectives: We examined the relation between prenatal exposure to drinking-water nitrate and selected birth defects, accounting for maternal water consumption patterns and nitrosatable drug exposure. Methods: With data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, we linked addresses of 3,300 case mothers and 1,121 control mothers from the Iowa and Texas sites to public water supplies and respective nitrate measurements. We assigned nitrate levels for bottled water from collection of representative samples and standard laboratory testing. Daily nitrate consumption was estimated from self-reported water consumption at home and work. Results: With the lowest tertile of nitrate intake around conception as the referent group, mothers of babies with spina bifida were 2.0 times more likely (95% CI: 1.3, 3.2) to ingest ≥ 5 mg nitrate daily from drinking water (vs. < 0.91 mg) than control mothers. During 1 month preconception through the first trimester, mothers of limb deficiency, cleft palate, and cleft lip cases were, respectively, 1.8 (95% CI: 1.1, 3.1), 1.9 (95% CI: 1.2, 3.1), and 1.8 (95% CI: 1.1, 3.1) times more likely than control mothers to ingest ≥ 5.42 mg of nitrate daily (vs. < 1.0 mg). Higher water nitrate intake did not increase associations between prenatal nitrosatable drug use and birth defects. Conclusions: Higher water nitrate intake was associated with several birth defects in offspring, but did not strengthen associations between nitrosatable drugs and birth defects. Source


Trademark
Marine Force | Date: 2014-10-07

diesel oil, engine oil, fuel oil, gun oil, gear oil, motor oil, lubricating oil, lubricating and general purposes greases, gear oil. on-line retail store services featuring motor oil, oil additives, fuel treatments, outboard engine oil, boat care products, grease, hub oil, fishing reel maintenance products, gun oil, and marine products.


Trademark
Marine Force | Date: 2014-10-07

diesel oil, engine oil, fuel oil, gun oil, gear oil, motor oil, lubricating oil, lubricating and general purposes greases, gear oil. on-line retail store services featuring motor oil, oil additives, fuel treatments, outboard engine oil, boat care products, grease, hub oil, fishing reel maintenance products, gun oil, and marine products.


Booth-Kewley S.,Naval Health Research Center | Schmied E.A.,Naval Health Research Center | Highfill-McRoy R.M.,Naval Health Research Center | Sander T.C.,U.S. Army | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation | Year: 2014

Purpose: Research suggests the importance of psychosocial factors in recovery from musculoskeletal injuries. The objective of this study was to identify predictors of recovery among U.S. Marines who had musculoskeletal injuries of the back, knee, or shoulder. Methods A sample of 134 participants was assessed at baseline and followed for 1 year to determine outcome information. Results: The strongest predictor of injury recovery at the 1-year follow-up was recovery expectations. In a multivariate logistic model with key demographic and psychosocial factors controlled, individuals who had high recovery expectations at baseline were over five times as likely to be recovered at follow-up as individuals who had low expectations (OR = 5.18, p<.01). Conclusions: This finding is consistent with a large body of research that has linked recovery expectations with better recovery outcomes in patients with musculoskeletal injuries as well as with research linking recovery expectations with better outcomes across a wide range of medical conditions. Applied to military populations, interventions designed to modify recovery expectations may have the potential to improve rates of return to duty and to reduce rates of disability discharge. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York (outside the USA). Source

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