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Carrigaline, Ireland

Widaa A.,Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland | Widaa A.,Trinity College Dublin | Widaa A.,AMBER Inc | Brennan O.,Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland | And 6 more authors.
Phytotherapy Research | Year: 2014

Bone degenerative diseases are on the increase globally and are often problematic to treat. This has led to a demand to identify supplements that aid bone growth and formation. Aquamin is a natural multi-mineral food supplement, derived from the red algae Lithothamnion species which contains calcium, magnesium and 72 other trace minerals. It has been previously reported to increase bone formation and mineralisation. This study aimed to investigate the 28 day in vitro osteogenic response of Aquamin supplemented with Vitamin D. The osteogenic potential of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells was analysed in standard osteogenic medium supplemented with Aquamin +/- Vitamin D3, and the controls consisted of osteogenic medium, +/- Vitamin D3. Proliferation of osteoblasts, metabolic activity and cell viability did not differ between Aquamin and the osteogenic control groups. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels and mineralisation were increased by the supplementation of Aquamin, and the addition of Vitamin D3 increased mineralisation for all groups. The combination of Aquamin and Vitamin D3 yielded a significant increase in ALP and mineralisation over Aquamin alone and the standard osteogenic control +/- Vitamin D3. This study demonstrates that Aquamin aids osteogenesis, and that its osteogenic response can be enhanced by combining Aquamin with Vitamin D3. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


O'Gorman D.M.,Marigot Ltd | Tierney C.M.,Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland | Brennan O.,Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland | Brennan O.,Trinity College Dublin | And 2 more authors.
Phytotherapy Research | Year: 2012

Osteoporosis is a global health problem characterized by low bone mass and an increase in bone fragility. It is now well accepted that dietary factors play a central role in bone development and health. Diet that lacks adequate minerals is considered to be a risk factor for osteoporosis. The food supplement, Aquamin, is a natural, multi-mineral derived from the red algae Lithothamnion corallioides, rich in calcium, magnesium and 72 other trace minerals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Aquamin on osteoblastic behaviour and mineralisation in a pre-osteoblastic cell line. Cell number and metabolic activity were assessed using Hoescht DNA and Alamar Blue assays respectively. Osteogenic differentiation was measured using an alkaline phosphatase assay while mineralisation was determined using von Kossa and alizarin red staining. It is reported here that Aquamin promotes increased mineralisation in osteoblast cell culture. These data suggest that the nutritional supplement Aquamin plays an important role in promoting bone formation and may be useful in treating bone diseases such as osteoporosis. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Ryan S.,University College Cork | O'Gorman D.M.,Marigot Ltd | Nolan Y.M.,University College Cork
Phytotherapy Research | Year: 2011

It is well established that neuroinflammation contributes to brain aging, and that cortical cells are particularly vulnerable. Lipopolysaccharide stimulates the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta from glial cells which consequently induces an impairment in neuronal cell function. The food supplement, Aquamin, is a natural, multi-mineral derived from the red algae Lithothamnion corallioides, rich in calcium, magnesium and 72 other trace minerals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory potential of Aquamin in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated, glial-enriched primary cultures of rat cortex. It is reported that Aquamin prevented lipopolysaccharide-induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta from cortical glia. These data suggest that nutritional supplements such as Aquamin may play an important role in impeding the detrimental effects of excessive inflammation in the brain. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Brennan O.,Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland | Brennan O.,Trinity College Dublin | Stenson B.,Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland | Stenson B.,Trinity College Dublin | And 4 more authors.
Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials | Year: 2015

Aquamin is a commercially-available supplement derived from the algae species Lithothamnion, which has proven osteogenic potential. By harnessing this potential and combining Aquamin with a collagen scaffold, with architecture and composition optimised for bone repair, the aim of this study was to develop a natural osteo-stimulative bone graft substitute. A fabrication process was developed to incorporate Aquamin into scaffolds to produce collagen-Aquamin (CollAqua) scaffolds at two different Aquamin concentrations, 100. F or 500. F (equivalent weight% of collagen or five times the weight of collagen respectively). CollAqua constructs had improved mechanical properties which were achieved without reducing the scaffold's permeability or porosity below the minimum level required for successful bone tissue engineering. The fabrication process produced a homogenous Aquamin distribution throughout the scaffold. Release kinetics revealed that in the first 12. h, the entire Aquamin content was released from the 100. F however, less than half of Aquamin in the 500. F was released with the remainder released approximately 21 days later giving an initial burst release followed by a delayed release. Osteoblasts cultured on the CollAqua scaffolds showed improved osteogenesis as measured by alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin and osteocalcin expression. This was confirmed by increased mineralisation as determined by von Kossa and Alizarin red staining.In conclusion, a cell and growth factor free collagen-based bone graft substitute with enhanced mechanical properties has been developed. The addition of Aquamin to the collagen biomaterial significantly improved mineralisation by osteoblasts and results in a new product which may be capable of enhancing osteogenesis to facilitate bone repair in vivo. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Bernard J.K.,University of Georgia | West J.W.,University of Georgia | Mullis N.,University of Georgia | Wu Z.,University of Georgia | And 2 more authors.
Professional Animal Scientist | Year: 2014

Thirty-six lactating Holstein cows were used in a randomized design trial to evaluate the effect of feeding supplemental calcareous marine algae on performance and select metabolic indices of health of Holstein cows in early lactation. Treatments included no supplement (NEG), 204 g/d of sodium bicarbonate (POS), or 87 g/d of calcareous marine algae (AB, Acid Buf, Celtic Sea Minerals). Beginning at 14 ± 4 DIM, all cows were fed NEG for 2 wk before being assigned randomly within parity and calving date to treatment for the following 10 wk. An interaction of treatment and week was observed for DMI, which was lowest during wk 1 and greatest during wk 9 and 10 for POS compared with NEG and AB. No differences were observed for yield of milk, components, or energy-corrected milk. Milk protein percentage tended to be greater for NEG compared with NEG and AB. An interaction of treatment and week was observed for efficiency of milk production (energy-corrected milk/ DMI) because efficiency was greatest for POS during wk 1 compared with all other treatments, but was greatest for AB during wk 8 to 10 compared with NEG and POS. Concentrations of MUN were greater for AB compared with NEG, but not different from POS. Serum glucose concentrations were greater for NEG compared with POS and AB. No differences were observed in concentrations of other serum metabolites or enzymes. Supplemental calcareous marine algae supported similar performance but improved efficiency of milk production during the wk 8 to 10 of the trial compared with diets with or without sodium bicarbonate. © 2014 American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists.

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