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Yanggu, South Korea

Yoon H.J.,Maria Reproductive Center | Kim H.J.,Maria Reproductive Center | Bae I.,Maria Reproductive Center | Chae S.J.,Maria Reproductive Center | And 3 more authors.
Clinical and Experimental Reproductive Medicine | Year: 2014

The effect of artificial oocyte activation (AOA) with a calcium ionophore on intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IMSI) was examined in patients with histories of repeated failed implantation attempts. Four singleton pregnancies and one twin pregnancy were obtained after embryos transfer (5/14, 35.7%). Therefore, AOA combined with IMSI can be considered an option for cycles with a fertilization defect and recurrent implantation failures. © 2014.


Yoon H.J.,Maria Fertility Hospital | Bae I.H.,Maria Fertility Hospital | Kim H.J.,Maria Fertility Hospital | Jang J.M.,Maria Fertility Hospital | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics | Year: 2013

Purpose: Fertilization failures have occurred repeatedly in reproductive centers after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and artificial oocyte activation (AOA) has been used to prevent it. This study was performed to investigate whether spermatozoan origin influences clinical outcomes of AOA with a calcium ionophore. Methods: A total of 185 ICSI cycles with a history of no or low fertilization was included in this retrospective study. The outcomes of AOA after ICSI were compared with ejaculated-normal, ejaculated-oligo-astheno- terato or extracted-testicular spermatozoa. Results: There were significant differences between the previous standard ICSI cycles and AOA cycles in the rate of fertilization and clinical outcomes among cases with different sperm origins. Thirty-eight healthy babies (20 singles and 18 twins, 29 cycles) were successfully delivered, and no congenital birth defects were observed. Conclusions: Most patients with a no or low fertilization history obtained an increased fertilization rate and a positive clinical outcome with AOA regardless of the origin of spermatozoa. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Yoon J.,Korea University | Yoon J.,Maria Research Center | Juhn K.-M.,Maria Research Center | Ko J.-K.,Maria Research Center | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics | Year: 2013

Purpose: Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) are key regulators of oxygen homeostasis in response to reduced oxygenation in somatic cells. In addition, HIF-1α protein can be also induced by insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) treatment in various cell lines under normoxic condition. However, the expression and function of HIF-1α in embryogenesis are still unclear. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to examine the expression of HIF-1α in mouse blastocysts cultured under hypoxic and normoxic conditions, and to determine whether oxygen tension and IGF-I influence embryonic development through stimulation of HIF-1α expression. Methods: Mouse embryos were cultured from the 1-cell to blastocyst stage under 5 % or 20 % O2 in both the absence and presence of IGF-I. Results: The embryonic development rates to the blastocyst stage were not affected by oxygen tension or IGF-I treatment. HIF-1α protein was localized to the cytoplasm of blastocysts, and its levels were independent of oxygen concentration or IGF-I treatment. Blastocysts cultured under 5 % O2 exhibited significantly higher total cell numbers (83.4 ± 18.1) and lower apoptotic index (3.7 ± 1.5) than those cultured under 20 % O2 (67.4 ± 15.6) (6.9 ± 3.5) (P < 0.05). IGF-I reduced the apoptotic index in both oxygen conditions, but a significant decrease was detected in the 20 % O 2 group. Conclusions: HIF-1α may not be a major mediator that responds to change in oxygen tension within blastocysts, inconsistent with that of somatic cells. Supplementation of culture media with IGF-I has been shown to promote embryo development by an anti-Apoptotic effect, instead of increasing HIF-1α protein expression. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Ryu E.K.,Maria Fertility Hospital | Hur Y.S.,Maria Fertility Hospital | Hur Y.S.,Kangwon National University | Ann J.Y.,Maria Fertility Hospital | And 8 more authors.
Clinical and Experimental Reproductive Medicine | Year: 2012

Objective: The aim of this study was to compare vitrification optimization of mouse embryos using electron microscopy (EM) grid, cryotop, and thin plastic strip (TPS) containers by evaluating developmental competence and apoptosis rates. Methods: Mouse embryos were obtained from superovulated mice. Mouse cleavage-stage, expanded, hatching-stage, and hatched-stage embryos were cryopreserved in EM grid, cryotop, and TPS containers by vitrification in 15% ethylene glycol, 15% dimethylsulfoxide, 10 μg/mL Ficoll, and 0.65 M sucrose, and 20% serum substitute supplement (SSS) with basal medium, respectively. For the three groups in which the embryos were thawed in the EM grid, cryotop, and TPS containers, the thawing solution consisted of 0.25 M sucrose, 0.125 M sucrose, and 20% SSS with basal medium, respectively. Rates of survival, re-expansion, reaching the hatched stage, and apoptosis after thawing were compared among the three groups. Results: Developmental competence after thawing of vitrified expanded and hatching-stage blastocysts using cryotop and TPS methods were significantly higher than survival using the EM grid (p<0.05). Also, apoptosis positive nuclei rates after thawing of vitrified expanded blastocysts using cryotop and TPS were significantly lower than when using the EM grid (p<0.05). Conclusion: The TPS vitrification method has the advantages of achieving a high developmental ability and effective preservation. © 2012. The Korean Society for Reproductive Medicine.


Hur Y.S.,Kangwon National University | Park J.H.,Kangwon National University | Ryu E.K.,Maria Fertility Hospital | Park S.J.,Maria Fertility Hospital | And 7 more authors.
Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics | Year: 2013

Purpose: Micro-vibration culture system was examined to determine the effects on mouse and human embryo development and possible improvement of clinical outcomes in poor responders. Materials and methods: The embryonic development rates and cell numbers of blastocysts were compared between a static culture group (n = 178) and a micro-vibration culture group (n = 181) in mice. The embryonic development rates and clinical results were compared between a static culture group (n = 159 cycles) and a micro-vibration culture group (n = 166 cycles) in poor responders. A micro-vibrator was set at a frequency of 42 Hz, 5 s/60 min duration for mouse and human embryo development. Results: The embryonic development rate was significantly improved in the micro-vibration culture group in mice (p < 0.05). The cell numbers of mouse blastocysts were significantly higher in the micro-vibration group than in the static culture group (p < 0.05). In the poor responders, the rate of high grade embryos was not significantly improved in the micro-vibration culture group on day 3. However, the optimal embryonic development rate on day 5 was improved in the micro-vibration group, and the total pregnancy rate and implantation rate were significantly higher in the micro-vibration group than in the static culture group (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Micro-vibration culture methods have a beneficial effect on embryonic development in mouse embryos. In poor responders, the embryo development rate was improved to a limited extent under the micro-vibration culture conditions, but the clinical results were significantly improved. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

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