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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The United States recently earned top honors in two coin design categories at the World Money Fair in Berlin, Germany. United States Mint (Mint) officials accepted two Coin of the Year (COTY) Awards on behalf of the Nation. The U.S. won in the category of Best Circulating Coin for its America the Beautiful Program quarter honoring Kisatchie National Forest and in the category of Most Inspirational Coin for its March of Dimes Silver Dollar commemorative coin. “The designers, sculptors and engravers of the Mint comprise the very best talent in the numismatic industry,” said David Motl, Acting Principal Deputy Director of the Mint. “Artists are an indispensable part of the coin production process and the Mint congratulates them on this well-deserved recognition.” The March of Dimes Silver Dollar, which celebrates the 75th anniversary of the establishment of the March of Dimes Foundation, includes a reverse (tails side) that was designed and sculpted by sculptor-engraver Don Everhart, who has been with the Mint since 2004. The obverse (heads side) of the coin features the profiles of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Dr. Jonas Salk, two leaders in the fight against polio, and was designed by Paul Balan, a member of the Artistic Infusing Program (AIP) since 2010 and sculpted by Mint sculptor-engraver Michael Gaudioso, who has been with the Mint since 2009. The America the Beautiful Program quarter honoring Kisatchie National Forest features a wild turkey in flight over blue stem grass with long leaf pine in the background on the reverse. The design is by Susan Gamble, who was part of the AIP from 2004 until her death in 2015. Sculptor-engraver Joseph Menna, who joined the Mint in 2005, sculpted the design. The COTY Awards recognize artistic talent among 10 design categories. A panel of international judges selects from coins issued two years prior to the year of the award. Both of the coins were issued in 2015 and are no longer available from the Mint. About the United States Mint The United States Mint was created by Congress in 1792 and became part of the Department of the Treasury in 1873. It is the Nation's sole manufacturer of legal tender coinage and is responsible for producing circulating coinage for the Nation to conduct its trade and commerce. The United States Mint also produces numismatic products, including proof, uncirculated, and commemorative coins; Congressional Gold Medals; and silver and gold bullion coins. The United States Mint's numismatic programs are self-sustaining and operate at no cost to taxpayers.


MISSISSAUGA, Ontario, Feb. 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The Toronto Spring Camping & RV Show producers are gearing up to provide MORE FUN and your BEST NEW RV SHOPPING OPPORTUNITY at the last RV & Camping Show of the season! Here’s what we have lined up for the BIG ONE in 2017! Campgrounds and Camping Products Talk to campground owners, camping product vendors and more! More Great RV Products and Services! Featuring:  RV Insurance, RV Rentals, Sunrooms, Golf Carts, Pet Treats, Leather Goods & Accessories, Water Toys, Camping Cookware, Dishes & Storage, Fire Pits, Solar Technology, RV Mats, RV Magazines and much more! Fish TV – Hosts Leo Stakos, Ron James and Jeff Chisholm will be on-site for the duration of the show.  They will be available to sign autographs and take pictures with their fans – remember to bring your cameras! Toyota – Official Truck Sponsor, displaying of their new trucks My Custom Sports Chair – Official Show Sponsor offering special show pricing on customized sports chairs!  $50 OFF when you purchase a custom sports chair at the show! GO RVing Canada Activity Zone to keep the family entertained! March of Dimes Madness sponsored by Wayfarer Insurance - Support the March of Dimes “Campers Helping Campers” program by donating $2 to try and get the top basketball score in 30 seconds for a chance to win a TV!  TV will be awarded to the top score at the end of the show on Sunday March 5th. Parks Canada Pavillion - Experience Parks Canada and get your free Discovery Pass at The Toronto Spring Camping & RV Show and Sale! On-site Financing offered by RBC, TD Auto Finance and National Bank of Canada. Daily Show Seminars Andy Thomson – RV Hitch Hints Peter Bristow -  RV Cleaners & Treatments Shane Devenish – RVing for beginners - RV Lifestyle for New Campers Fish TV Kidz Zone – not just for kids! Chance to Win Your Payments paid for up to 12 months on the purchase of your new Recreational Vehicle at the show (Up to $5000 OAC)! Chance to win 1 of 8 Truma LevelChecks! Know the level of your propane gas cylinder in a second!  Reliable measurement using ultrasound with integrated LED flashlight. Chance to win a new Custom Sports Chair! Win and customize your own sports chair! Chance to win Family Camping Weekend Passes to Havelock Country Music Jamboree and Haverock Music Revival! Admission Price Specials Half price Thursday and Friday only $7.50 Saturday and Sunday On-Line special $14.00 Saturday and Sunday – At the Door $15.00 Media Passes Email Shannon.ocallaghan@crva.ca if you wish to attend the show. Parking is always FREE The entire International Centre parking lot is available for the BIG ONE and is always free to park. Entrances There are three entrances into the BIG ONE.  Hall 1, Halls 2/3 and Hall 5. The Toronto Spring Camping & RV Show and Sale is the largest consumer RV Show in Canada and the only RV Show promoted by the Canadian Recreational Vehicle Association is held annually at The International Centre in Mississauga. Learn more about the BIG RV SHOW at www.torontospringcampingrvshow.com or call us at 905-336-8949.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.forbes.com

Fracking, or drilling for gas by hydraulic fracturing, has been associated with a growing number of health risks. Last week, I began this series looking at some of the hazardous chemicals injected into the wells to make drilling easier and cheaper, and the growing risks to our health by the GOP rushing through the approval of Scott Pruitt to head the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This post looks in greater depth at the health problems linked to fracking. These are not hypothetical concerns—there are now more than 700 studies looking at risks—and more than 80% of the health studies document risks or actual harms. It’s also important to note that these risks are likely to be seriously underestimated, because the environmental agencies have been downplaying the risks to the public. A new in-depth exposé from investigative journalists at Public Herald looks in-depth at the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection’s (DEP) misconduct and negligence, as the DEP studiously ignored citizens’ complaints, sometimes not even testing water samples. Earlier studies from ProPublica and others showed similar EPA failures in the western U.S. A variety of health problems are associated with fracking Cough, shortness of breath and wheezing are the most common complaints of residents living near fracked wells. Toxic gases like benzene are released from the rock by fracking. Similarly, a toxic waste brew of water and chemicals is often stored in open pits, releasing volatile organic compounds into the air. These noxious chemicals and particulates are also released by the diesel powered pumps used to inject the water. An epidemiological study of more than 400,000 patients of Pennsylvania’s Geisinger clinic, done with Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, found a significant association between fracking and increases in mild, moderate and severe cases of asthma (odds ratios 4.4 to 1.5). Hopkins’ Dr. Brian Schwartz cautions that residents should be aware of this hazard as “some ‘pristine’ rural areas are converted to heavily trafficked industrial areas.” Fracking chemicals are harmful to pregnant women and their developing babies. West Virginia researchers found endocrine-disrupting chemicals in surface waters near wastewater disposal sites; these types of chemicals can hurt the developing fetus even when present at very low concentrations. Another Hopkins/Geisinger study looked at records of almost 11,000 women with newborns who lived near fracking sites and found a 40% increased chance of having a premature baby and a 30% risk of having the pregnancy be classified as “high-risk,” though they controlled for socioeconomic status and other risk factors. Contributing factors likely include air and water pollution, stress from the noise and traffic (1,000 tankers/well on average). Premature babies accounted for 35% of infant deaths in 2010. In addition to the personal toll on the families, preemies are very expensive for society—prematurity is a major cause of neurologic disabilities in kids, and their cost of care was more the $26 billion in 2005 alone, or $51,600 per preemie. Cost to employers during the infant’s first year of life averaged $46,004—more than tenfold higher than for a full-term delivery. [Note that if the Affordable Care Act is repealed, women may once again be denied health insurance for pregnancies and a premature baby will likely never be granted health insurance. According to the March of Dimes, Medicaid expansion of health insurance to low-income citizens helped the percentage of babies born as preemies drop to a low level of 11.4% in 2013.] Other studies have found that the noise from the drilling itself, the gas compressors, other heavy equipment and the truck traffic is high enough to disturb sleep, cause stress and increase high blood pressure. Longer-term exposure to noise pollution contributes to endocrine abnormalities and diabetes, heart disease, stress and depression, and has been linked to learning difficulties in children. Sleep deprivation has pervasive public health consequences, from causing accidents to chronic diseases. Another epidemiologic study from University of Pennsylvania and Columbia University compared the hospitalization rates between a county with active fracking and a neighboring county without. This study found that fracking well density was significantly associated with higher inpatient hospitalization for cardiac or neurologic problems. There was also an association between skin conditions, cancer and urologic problems and the proximity of homes to active wells. With disturbing frequency, new spills or accidents are reported at the same time as industry tries to reassure that fracking brings safe and clean energy. Tell that to the residents of Dimock, Pa., who have had their drinking water destroyed, or those in many other communities. A newly released study found 6,648 spills in just four states over the past 10 years. Once again, the EPA had reported a far lower number—457 in eight states over a six-year period. Why the huge difference? Because the EPA chose to only look at the actual fracturing stage, rather than the whole life cycle of the gas and oil production. The DeSmogBlog notes that just this month, the day after U.S. Army Corps of Engineers gave the owners of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) the final permit it needed to build across Lake Oahe (threatening the Standing Rock Sioux tribe’s land and water), a pipeline of a DAPL co-owner exploded near New Orleans, killing one and injuring others. Aging pipelines pose special risks as they deteriorate. An ExxonMobil pipeline built in 1947 spilled 134,000 gallons of gas in Arkansas. You can see the location and magnitude of the spills at this handy interactive from the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) Science for Nature and People Partnership (SNAPP). Another disturbing data viz shows the type of spill and whether water was impacted. But new fracking has additional risks, as the conventional pipes often used are unable to withstand the high pressure of the fracking mixture being injected. In fact, new wells were not safer, and 6% of unconventional (fracked) wells drilled since 2000 showed problems, with even the Pa. DEP (shown by Public Herald to not be thorough in investigating citizens' complaints, nor entirely forthcoming) confirming more than 100 contaminated drinking water wells. The oil and gas industry says that these health problems are not proven to be caused by fracking. That is partially true—especially since agencies like the Pa. DEP have actively hidden complaints or even failed to test the water of residents, as Public Herald reported. With the new head of the EPA, Scott Pruitt, determined to dismantle the agency and its protections, we will likely never have definitive proof. Some health problems, such as cancer and some neurologic problems, also take years to develop after an exposure. Fracking profits go to private industry but the public—families and communities—bear the costs of the many health complications from the drilling. There is growing evidence of a variety of health problems being associated with fracking. Common sense dictates that drinking and breathing cancer-causing agents will take their toll. The correlation is too strong to ignore, especially when we have other, cleaner energy options. For our safety and that of future generations, we should not allow the new administration to sell off public lands, nor allow drilling on our land, and should ban fracking completely. For more medical/pharma news and perspective, follow me on Twitter @drjudystone or here at Forbes


Grants Aim To Reduce Preterm Births By Encouraging Pregnancy Spacing, Enhancing Prenatal Care, and Improving Diagnosis of Heart Birth Defects SAN FRANCISCO, CA--(Marketwired - February 28, 2017) - March of Dimes announced today a substantial investment in California community grants. One-year grants totaling $139,000 are being distributed to four new recipients. March of Dimes is also distributing $139,000 to five recipients in their final year of 2015 - 2017 grant projects, with three-year funding totaling more than $560,000. This brings the multi-year investment to $699,000. March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit for pregnancy and baby health. Community grants support March of Dimes vision to close the health inequities gap and improve infant health by reducing the occurrence of birth defects, premature birth, and infant mortality. With the one-year California Community Grants, March of Dimes is funding innovative efforts to engage women in reproductive life planning and to encourage women to space pregnancies at least 18 months apart. "Thirty-nine percent of all pregnancies in California occur less than 18 months after the birth of a child," said March of Dimes State Maternal Child Health Committee Chair, Diana E. Ramos, MD, MPH, Director, Reproductive Health, Los Angeles County Public Health. "Interpregnancy spacing (the time between the end of one pregnancy and the beginning of the next one) of less than 18 months is associated with higher rates of premature birth, low birth weight, neonatal complications, neonatal death and maternal complications, with very short pregnancy spacing (<6 months) carrying the greatest risk. There is a two-fold increase in early preterm births among women with very short pregnancy spacing of fewer than 6 months."1 All of the one-year grant recipients will implement One Key Question®, an initiative created by the Oregon Foundation for Reproductive Health. This model provides primary care health teams, community health workers, and other providers with a simple question to incorporate pregnancy intention screening, "Would you like to become pregnant in the next year?" into routine care and services. Women are then offered essential preconception care and reproductive health services (or referrals) depending on their needs. The one-year grant recipients were selected from priority counties in California with a high burden or high volume of preterm births and high rates of pregnancies spaced less than 18 months apart. "We know we can make a difference in the lives of babies and their moms when we provide funds to community-based or statewide projects that have the potential to improve birth outcomes and reduce premature birth rates, especially among high-risk groups," said Kelly Ernst, MPH, March of Dimes Vice President of Maternal Child Health. "Fully one-third of all pregnancies in the U.S. occur less than 18 months after the birth of a child, which is a known risk factor for preterm birth. Ensuring that more women wait at least 18 months between giving birth and getting pregnant again can help reduce preterm birth rates. The March of Dimes has invested in community programs for more than 70 years. While we proudly fund innovative research in many of California's leading educational institutions, research to develop new interventions takes time. Our community programs can ensure that known evidence-based interventions are made available to women right now to improve birth outcomes." The goal of the Reproductive Life Planning Project is to improve La Clínica's capacity to proactively support female patients in meeting their reproductive health and family planning goals through patient-centered screening, follow-up, and care. La Clínica will implement One Key Question® at one clinic site in Alameda County, targeting women age 15-50. The Los Angeles County Department of Health Services Women's Health Programs and Innovation Division has added reproductive life preference questions to its new Electronic Health Record system to be asked of all women of childbearing age who come in for ambulatory care services. The project team will train nurses, medical assistants and community health workers to ask One Key Question®, document in the medical record and provide follow-up services and education. The Preconception Care Coordination Collaborative for San Diego will implement the One Key Question® model in 2-3 clinic and community locations. They will screen women who have had a baby in the previous 12 months. Women who answer the question with positive or uncertain pregnancy intention will be offered a class and home visit for preconception education, including reproductive life planning, and care coordination for any services needed. Women who receive a home visit will also receive a three-month follow-up visit to assess if they have made progress toward goals set during their first visit and to assist them with services. 2-1-1 Health Navigators will check in with new mothers 6 weeks following the birth of their child asking One Key Question®, educating them about spacing and risks associated with short pregnancy intervals and offering referrals for support services, with the goal of educating and empowering women to make knowledgeable decisions about their family planning and child spacing. (2-1-1 is the county-wide nonprofit resource and information hub that connects people with community, health and disaster services, with partnerships dedicated to serving pregnant and postpartum women and women with children 0-5 years old). "Birth spacing and preconception health is a key issue in our San Diego communities but one that hasn't received the attention it deserves, nor the resources," said Katherine Selchau, MA,Director, Local Capacity Strengthening & Collective Impact, California Border Healthy Start PLUS Project. "So many programs and resources are directed towards the health of pregnant women and infants, but not enough towards the health of women before and between pregnancies, which has a huge effect on positive outcomes for both mother and child. With this March of Dimes grant, we have an opportunity to pilot a great framework that is community- based and can set San Diego apart as a leader in strategies that can impact families from the earliest possible opportunity." March of Dimes is also distributing $139,000 to five recipients in their final year of 2015 - 2017 grant projects, with three-year funding totaling more than $560,000. These community grants are increasing and enhancing prenatal care, improving screening and diagnosis of heart birth defects, as well as, improving interconception health. Programs target diverse, underserved women, including those who are incarcerated, as well as the Latina, Pacific Islander, and African-American communities. The March of Dimes California 2015-2017 grant recipients are: Alameda County Department of Public Health: will strive to reduce preterm birth among Pacific Islanders by increasing early and regular prenatal care as a result of culturally appropriate care coordination in Alameda County. Alameda Health System: will strive to ensure healthy birth outcomes for mothers and newborns by increasing access to prenatal care through offering group prenatal care using the popular CenteringPregnancy® model at Highland Wellness, Alameda Health System's largest prenatal health clinic. City of Long Beach Department of Health and Human Services: will strive to decrease depression, increase positive coping skills and increase physical activity among African-American women, with the goal of improving maternal health and birth outcomes. Loma Linda University Children's Hospital: will strive to improve the prenatal diagnosis rate of complex congenital heart disease (CHD) in the Southern Inland Counties Regional Perinatal Program Region through health care provider trainings. Special Service for Groups, Families & Criminal Justice Division: will strive to improve maternal and newborn health through case management, education and support services for pregnant, jailed women. Each year nearly 4,000,000 babies are born in the United States, and March of Dimes touches each one of them through community programs, advocacy, research, education, and support. March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit organization for pregnancy and baby health. March of Dimes works to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth, and infant mortality. Premature birth and its complications are now the leading global cause of death for children under 5 years old. Premature birth costs the United States more than $26 billion annually, according to the Institute of Medicine. For the latest resources and information, visit marchofdimes.org or for resources in Spanish, nacersano.org. Find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Educational video resources are available on our YouTube channel.


INDIANAPOLIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Increased reimbursement to doctors who offer group prenatal care improves birth outcomes and significantly reduces Medicaid plan costs, according to a new study co-authored by Anthem, Inc. Medicaid is the largest payer of maternity health benefits in the U.S., and inpatient costs associated with preterm births exceed $6 billion per year – representing half of all costs associated with infant births. One in 10 American babies is born prematurely, placing the newborn at increased risk of death, medical complications and lifelong health challenges. The study, published in the January-February 2017 edition of Women’s Health Issues Journal, is the first to examine the newborn intensive care unit (NICU) cost savings from the group prenatal care program, CenteringPregnancy, to payers when a managed care organization provided enhanced reimbursement to doctors to defray the costs and reward providers for encouraging patient participation in the program. “Anthem is dedicated to the health of American families, which is why our Foundation is a longtime champion of CenteringPregnancy through financial support of the March of Dimes and the Centering Healthcare Institute,” said Karen Shea, Anthem’s vice president of maternal child health and one of the co-authors of the paper. “This study demonstrates that designing payment programs that sustain CenteringPregnancy at the ob/gyn practice level are a potentially sound investment for payers to reduce inpatient costs and help more babies get a healthy start in life.” The CenteringPregnancy model requires significant upfront and continuing investment from practices, including patient education materials, annual certification fees and office support staff training. Although increased costs to the practices may be small in comparison with the potential savings for payers and the overall health care system, it often remains a barrier to implementation and few payers have developed enhanced reimbursement policies to cover the cost of CenteringPregnancy. The study examined an enhanced reimbursement pilot project from the South Carolina Department of Health and Human Services to BlueChoice Health Plan South Carolina Medicaid, which in turn passed the additional incentive payments along to participating prenatal care practices. The study compared a group of 85 pregnant women enrolled in Medicaid who attended at least four CenteringPregnancy sessions with a similar group of expectant mothers who instead saw their doctor individually. The pregnant women participating in the CenteringPregnancy program had a 3.5 percent NICU admission rate, while 12 percent of the matched control group had babies needing NICU care. The lower rate of hospital admissions resulted in an estimated net cost savings of $67,293 for the Medicaid managed care organization covering the 85 women. The typical care model for women in the U.S. with uncomplicated pregnancies involves brief individual doctor appointments focused on identifying medical risks, with limited opportunity for counseling and support. In the Centering Pregnancy model, groups of eight to 12 pregnant women due within the same month attend sessions with an individual medical assessment followed by a 90-minute group discussion on topics including stress management, labor and nutrition. The open discussion format promotes information sharing among women, social support and the involvement of significant others. “The value of the group model is that it engages patients in their own health, enhances the care experience for both patient and provider, and creates a community of support,” says Angie Truesdale, CEO of Centering Healthcare Institute. “All of these components contribute to cost savings and healthier moms and babies.” In addition to Anthem, representatives from BlueChoice Health Plan South Carolina Medicaid, Greenville Health System and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Greenville Health System co-authored the paper. Anthem is working to transform health care with trusted and caring solutions. Our health plan companies deliver quality products and services that give their members access to the care they need. With over 73 million people served by its affiliated companies, including approximately 40 million within in its family of health plans, Anthem is one of the nation’s leading health benefits companies. For more information about Anthem’s family of companies, please visit www.antheminc.com/companies. Centering Healthcare Institute is improving health by transforming care through Centering groups. It has developed and sustained the Centering model in more than 450 practice sites and in some of the largest health systems in the world. They have partnered with many dedicated individuals and organizations to build a future where group healthcare becomes the standard of care. For more information on Centering Healthcare Institute and the Centering models of group care, visit www.centeringhealthcare.org.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

An internationally-recognized aesthetic spa in Memphis is the first in the state of Tennessee to provide the most advanced laser tattoo removal treatment available. Whether it’s a full tattoo removal or a partial tattoo removal to prepare for a new or cover-up tattoo, the twenty percent of the population who regret their tattoo(s) can restore their skin with the breakthrough PiQo4™ tattoo removal laser at Mona Spa and Laser. Mona Sappenfield, an industry leader in aesthetic treatments and owner of the 25-year-old West Tennessee business, is helping those with unwanted tattoos revise their image by providing access to laser tattoo removal treatments in an effort to rebuild or reinforce their confidence in how they look. Sappenfield knows the impact appearance can have on navigating one’s life experiences—regardless of socio-economic status or personal history. She wants to make the best aesthetic services available to people who want to look their best but may have tattoos or marks they no longer desire or that may hinder their opportunities and goals. “I want my clients to understand that we are helping their lives with aesthetic care and grooming,” said Sappenfield. “At many levels, they can improve their self-esteem, relationships, and job acceptance by how they feel and look. Offering safe, results-oriented treatments to clients has been my passion for over 30 years.” Mona Spa and Laser can now provide those with light or dark skin an effective treatment for removing skin blemishes and all nine of the most common tattoo ink colors, whereas most common tattoo removal lasers are less safe and less effective. “This innovative laser treatment system is very powerful and more efficient in getting faster and more complete results,” said Sappenfield. “It has proven to get more treatments from one machine with multiple hand pieces for multiple services—other devices are not as multifunctional. In fact, we are in the process of moving two devices out due to the new PiQo4.” The PiQo4™ laser treatment features the world’s most advanced tattoo removal and skin restoration technology and is the only FDA-cleared picosecond and nanosecond laser with four wavelengths for advanced treatment of tattoos and pigmented lesions. The treatment area is larger, more powerful, and safer than the previous generation lasers, and its advanced features result in a reported 40 percent fewer treatments needed—with some patients only needing one or two treatments to achieve desired results. Mona Spa and Laser is also an active member of the local community, participating in the March of Dimes Celebrity Chef Dinner and the Junior Leagues Merry Marketplace every year. In addition, Sappenfield opened her doors to the community for an annual Heartfelt Holiday Open House earlier this month. About Mona Spa and Laser Mona Spa and Laser in Memphis, Tenn. is a 25-year old aesthetics spa owned and operated by Mona Sappenfield and specializing in non-ablative, non-invasive, and no-downtime skin rejuvenation for healthy and vibrant skin. Sappenfield is a state leader in her field, serving as a Tennessee Cosmetology & Barber Examiners Board Member and a Tennessee Subject Matter Expert, as well as being a CIDESCO Diplomaté, an ASLMS Fellow, and NCEA-certified. She is dedicated to discovering safe new aesthetic products and devices to offer innovative and results-oriented treatments. By helping people look and feel better, Mona Spa and Laser provides solutions to skin and appearance problems that can disrupt and lessen one’s quality of life. For more information visit http://www.monaspaandlaser.com. About the PiQo4 Laser Treatment System The PiQo4 Laser Treatment System is available from Zarin Medical™. Zarin provides a suite of lasers for aesthetic procedures (tattoo and hair removal, vascular conditions, etc.) and medical conditions (feminine rejuvenation, urogynecology, etc.). Contact Zarin toll-free at (844) 927-4600 or visit http://www.ZarinMedical.com for more information.


Fleischman A.R.,March of Dimes
Obstetrics and Gynecology | Year: 2010

Term birth (37-41 weeks of gestation) has previously been considered a homogeneous group to which risks associated with preterm (less than 37 weeks of gestation) and postterm births (42 weeks of gestation and beyond) are compared. An examination of the history behind the definition of term birth reveals that it was determined somewhat arbitrarily. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that significant differences exist in the outcomes of infants delivered within this 5-week interval. We focus attention on a subcategory of term births called "early term," from 37 0/7 to 38 6/7 weeks of gestation, because there are increasing data that these births have increased mortality and neonatal morbidity as compared with neonates born later at term. The designation "term" carries with it significant clinical implications with respect to the management of pregnancy complications as well as the timing of both elective and indicated delivery. Management of pregnancies should clearly be guided by data derived from gestational age-specific studies. We suggest adoption of this new subcategory of term births (early term births), and call on epidemiologists, clinicians, and researchers to collect data specific to the varying intervals of term birth to provide new insights and strategies for improving birth outcomes. © 2010 by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. © 2010 by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Simpson J.L.,March of Dimes
Seminars in Fetal and Neonatal Medicine | Year: 2014

Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) using in-vitro fertilization (IVF) account for ~1% of births in the USA and as much as 3-4% in Europe or Australia. Initially studies involved infants prospectively examined in an early cohort of US births, with salutary results. Later studies began to show the frequency of birth defects to be increased. In meta-analysis, odds ratio was >1.0, with the 95% confidence limit not extending to <1.0. Although ART are associated with a 30% increase in birth defects; subfertile couples achieving pregnancy without ART show a 20% increase. It thus appears that the increase in birth defects is due less, if at all, to ART protocols per se than to the biological perturbations that generated the infertility that necessitated ART to achieve pregnancy. There is consensus that traditional IVF and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)/IVF show the same overall risk notwithstanding increased sex chromosome abnormalities in both procedures and increased hypospadias in ICSI. No other organ system seems disproportionately affected. There is no additive risk in ART twins compared with non-ART twins, nor in embryos having been cryopreserved. The increased risk observed had not appeared to dissuade couples from attempting to have their own children. © 2014 .


WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., March 2, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- March of Dimes officials responded today to a new government report showing that brain abnormalities or microcephaly has occurred about 33 times as often in the United States since the arrival of Zika virus in the Americas....


WASHINGTON, Feb. 16, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The March of Dimes released the following statement from President Stacey D. Stewart regarding a comment made today by Seema Verma, nominee to serve as Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, during her Senate...

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