Manarat International University

www.manarat.ac.bd/
Dhaka, Bangladesh

Manarat International University is a private university in Bangladesh. It was established in 2001 by the Manarat Trust, which had run a first grade school and college for more than twenty years. Wikipedia.

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Begum N.,Manarat International University | Nakanishi T.,Hiroshima University | Sadiah S.,Hiroshima University | Islam M.E.,Jahangirnagar University
Proceedings - 2016 4th International Symposium on Computing and Networking, CANDAR 2016 | Year: 2016

A group signature scheme allows a user to anonymously sign a message on behalf of a group. One of important issues in group signature schemes is the user revocation. Previously, Libert et al. proposed an elegant revocable group signature scheme with O(1) signing/verification costs, O(1) signature size, O(1) membership certificate size, and O(logN) public key size, where N is the number of group members. However, the revocation list (RL) size is O(R), where R is the number of revoked members. Due to O (R) signatures in the RL, the RL size amounts to 8 MB in case of R = 10, 000. Then, a revocable group signature scheme with O(R/T) RL size was previously proposed for an integer parameter T, by accumulating T entries in the RL. Thus, we can expect that the delay time for a signer to fetch the RL is reduced in mobile environment. As the trade-off, the signing cost is increased by O(T). However, this scheme with the compact RL has not been implemented yet, and the practicality on the computation times for concrete T is unknown. In this paper, we implemented the scheme with the compact RL, and explore the practicality, where the signing time is greatly reduced by the technique to reduce the witness computation for the accumulator shown in the previous paper. From the experimental results, the signing and verification times are less than 500 ms and 900 ms even for T = 100, and thus we can confirm that the implemented scheme is practical, and the accumulating technique in the implemented scheme is sufficiently effective. © 2016 IEEE.


Rahman M.M.,Manarat International University | Islam S.N.,University of Dhaka
International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences | Year: 2014

Objective: Intake of vitamin E, C and A have been reported to reduce lung cancer risk because of their roles as regulators of cell differentiation (vitamin A), antioxidants (vitamins C and E), and modulators of DNA synthesis, methylation and repair. Some case-control studies have found inverse associations between intakes of these vitamins and lung cancer risk. However, most of the prospective studies evaluating these nutrients have not found clear inverse associations. Because many of these prospective studies have included less than 100 lung cancer cases, they lacked statistical power to detect modest inverse associations. Therefore, in order to address the national issue the present study attempted a little beat to explore the association between some antioxidant vitamins with lung cancer. Methods: In this study we investigated cases (lung cancer) and control group (Smoker); serum Vitamin A, Vitamin C and Vitamin E level estimation were focused. Detailed information on these facts was collected by questionnaire and blood sample analysis, which were then complied and analyzed with a statistical software package. Results: In this study we found that Serum vitamin C levels were significantly higher in case (0.8 ± 0.2 μg /dl) than in control (0.30±0.1μg/dl). But Serum vitamin A and serum vitamin E level showed less difference between cases (75.89±24.1μg/dl) and (657.25±322.7μg/dl) and controls (74.87±26.6μg/dl) and (641.55±413.5μg/dl) respectively. Conclusion: It can be suggested that vitamin E, C, and A has no effect on lung cancer patients.


Rahman M.H.,Bangladesh University | Alam M.B.,Bangladesh University | Chowdhury N.S.,Manarat International University | Jha M.K.,Bangladesh University | And 4 more authors.
International Journal of Pharmacology | Year: 2011

In the present study crude methanolic extract of Stephania japonica leaf was investigated for possible antioxidant, analgesic and toxic activity. The extract showed antioxidant activity in DPPH radical scavenging activity, nitric oxide scavenging activity and reducing power assays. In both DPPH radical and NO scavenging assay, the extract exhibited moderate antioxidant activity and the IC50 values in DPPH radical scavenging and NO scavenging assays were found to be 105.55±1.06 and 129.12±0.15 ug mL-1, respectively while the IC50 values of ascorbic acid were 12.30±0.11 and 18.64±0.22 ug mL-1, respectively. Reducing power activity of the extract increased in a dose dependent manner. Analgesic activity of the crude extract was evaluated using acetic acid-induced writhing model of pain in mice. The crude extract at 200 and 400 mg kg-1 b. wt. doses displayed significant (p<0.001) reduction in acetic acid induced writhing in mice with a maximum effect of 75.89% reduction at 400 mg kg-1 b.wt. which is comparable to the standard, diclofenac sodium (86.52%). The extract was also investigated for toxic potentiality using Brine Shrimp lethality bioassay. In this bioassay the extract showed significant toxicity to Brine Shrimp nauplii with the LC50 value of 25.19±0.98 ug mL-1. The study clearly indicates that the extract possesses good analgesic and cytotoxic activity along with moderate antioxidant potential. © 2011 Asian Network for Scientific Information.


Chowdhury N.S.,Manarat International University | Alam M.B.,Atish Dipankar University of Science and Technology | Tanbirul Haque A.S.M.,Atish Dipankar University of Science and Technology | Zahan R.,Atish Dipankar University of Science and Technology | And 2 more authors.
Global Journal of Pharmacology | Year: 2011

Investigation with the crude methanolic extract of Aponogeton undulatus was carried out to evaluate its possible antioxidant and thrombolysis activity. In DPPH free radical scavenging assay, the extract exhibited potent antioxidant activity with a IC50 values of 2.43±1.06 μg/ml while in ascorbic acid, the value become 50 2.14±0.11 μg/ml. In thrombolytic activity using in vitro clot lysis assay method, the crude methanolic extract was found to have significant (p<0.001) thrombolytic activity at a dose of 10 mg/ml with a miximum effect of 20.23±1.56% while the standard streptokinase showed 46.13±3.87%. The extract was also investigated for its antibacterial and toxic potentiality using agar diffusion and Brine Shrimp lethality bioassay, respectively. The highest antibacterial effect was shown against Bacillus cereus (zone of inhibition 12±0.65 mm) followed by Escherichia coli (zone of inhibition 10±0.71 mm). In this bioassay the extract showed significant toxicity to Brine Shrimp nauplii with the LC50 value of 2.24±0.98 μg/ml. The study clearly indicated that the extract 50 possesses good antioxidant and thromolytic activity along with broad spectrum antibacterial and toxic potentiality. © IDOSI Publications, 2011.


Al Nayeem A.,Khulna University | Khatun A.,Manarat International University | Rahman M.S.,Khulna University | Rahman M.,Northern University of Bangladesh
Journal of Pharmacognosy and Phytotherapy | Year: 2011

The ethanol extract of the dried leaves of Mikania cordata (Family-Asteraceae) was investigated for its possible bioactive chemical groups and antinociceptive, cytotoxic and antibacterial activities in animal models. The extract produced significant writhing inhibition in acetic acid-induced writhing in mice at the oral dose of 125 and 250 mg/kg body weight (p<0.001) comparable to the standard drug diclofenac sodium at the dose of 25 mg/kg of body weight. The crude extract produced the moderate cytotoxic activity against brine shrimp Artemia salina (LC50=90 and LC90=166 μg/ml). The extract showed antibacterial activity against some types of microorganisms upon which the extract was employed. The obtained results provide a support for the use of this plant in traditional medicine and its further investigation. © 2011 Academic Journals.


Badrul Alam M.,Atish Dipankar University of Science and Technology | Sarowar Hossain M.,Atish Dipankar University of Science and Technology | Chowdhury N.S.,Manarat International University | Ehsanul Haque Mazumder M.,University of Sydney | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology | Year: 2011

In course of investigation on natural antioxidants, the present study was aimed to report the antioxidant activities, both in vitro and in vivo, of the crude methanolic extracts of the whole plant of Oxalis corniculata Linn along with its various organic fractions. The different assay methods, including total antioxidant activity, scavenging free radical, authentic peroxynitrite, nitric oxide and reducing power assessment were used to evaluate the antioxidant potential of the crude extract and its organic fractions. The ethylacetate (EtOAc) fraction, showed strong activity in all the model systems tested and in peroxynitrite model this fraction (IC50 value of 2.29±0.18 μg mL-1) exerted three-fold stronger activity than standard penicillamine (IC50 value of 6.20±0.32 μg mL-1). The reducing power of the extract was found to be concentration dependent. The administration of the extract/fractions at a dose of 250 and 500 mg kg-1 body weight to the male Wistar rats increased the percentage inhibition of reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase significantly. Whereas, lipid peroxidation level in hepatotoxic rats markedly decreased at a dose of 500 mg kg-1 body weight after 7 days. The total phenol and flavonoid content were also measured in the crude extract along with its organic fractions. The Brine shrimp lethality bioassay was used to determine the toxicity of the extracts and Vincristin sulphate was used as positive control. The dichloromethane (CH2Cl2) fraction showed highest activity (LC50 value of 29.02±1.16 μg mL-1) and other showed activity in the order of: EtOAc fraction >n-BuOH fraction > MeOH extract > aqueous fraction. Taken together, these results suggest that O. corniculata extract has strong antioxidant properties and further validate the traditional use of this plant. © 2011 Academeic Journals Inc.


Khatun A.,Manarat International University | Rahman M.,Northern University of Bangladesh | Kabir S.,Manarat International University | Akter M.N.,Khulna University | Chowdhury S.A.,University of Dhaka
International Journal of Research in Ayurveda and Pharmacy | Year: 2013

Ardisia humilis Vahl. (Family-Myrsinaceae) has been traditionally used by the folklore medicinal practitioners of Bangladesh to treat cancer, heart diseases and liver poisoning where cytotoxic, thrombolytic and antioxidant medications are implicated. Besides, some other species of Ardisia were reported to have incriminated properties and chemical constituents. In this study, the crude methanolic extract of the A. humilis was evaluated for its possible cytotoxic, thrombolytic and antioxidant activities in different methods to justify some of its folklore use. Cytotoxic property of the extract was determined against brine shrimp nauplii. The thrombolytic activity was evaluated using the standard streptokinase. The antioxidant activity was measured using free radical scavenging activity with 2-2-diphenyl,1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The extract showed significant cytotoxic effect in brine shrimp lethality bioassay where it showed the value of LC50 and LC90 2.26 μg/ml and 7.13 μg/ml after 24 hours respectively. The standard cytotoxic drug vincristine sulphate showed LC50 and LC90 of 0.81μg/ml and 6.33μg/ml after 24 hour respectively. The study gave a significant indication of the use of the plant extract as a potential source for cytotoxic compounds. The extract showed moderate thrombolytic activity of 33.33% clot lysis where the standard streptokinase showed that of 84%. In DPPH free radical scavenging test, IC50 value for the methanolic crude extract was found fairly significant (4.305 μg/ml) while compared to the IC50 value of the reference standards ascorbic acid (2.8 μg/ml). The obtained results tend to suggest the probable cytotoxic, thrombolytic and antioxidant activities of the methanolic extract of A. humilis justify its use in folkloric remedies and those activities of other species of Ardisia. © 2010 IJRAP.


Rahman M.,Northern University of Bangladesh | Khatun A.,Manarat International University | Islam S.,Manarat International University | Akter A.,Manarat International University | Kawser U.,Manarat International University
Pharmacologyonline | Year: 2015

The ethanol extract of Olea europaea of the family Oleaceae has been evaluated for the presence of bioactive secondary metabolites by using standard chromogenic reagent and cytotoxicity by brine shrimp lethality bioassay. The ethanol extract of the plant indicated the presence of alkaloids, steroids, flavonoids and tannins . The plant extract exhibited significant cytotoxic effect on brine shrimp lethality bioassay, where the plant extract showed LC50 of 263.4 and 13.09 µg/ml after 18 and 24 hours respectively. For the standard carboplatin, LC50 were found 70.21 and 0.45 µg/ml respectively after 18 hours and 24hours. © 2015, SILAE (Italo-Latin American Society of Ethnomedicine). All rights reserved.


Khatun A.,Manarat International University | Chowdhury U.K.,Manarat International University | Jahan A.,Manarat International University | Rahman M.,Northern University of Bangladesh
Pharmacologyonline | Year: 2014

The methanol extract of Cestrum diurnum L. belonging to the family Solanaceae has been investigated for the presence of its secondary metabolites and evaluation of biological activities of the crude extractive for the brine shrimp lethality bioassay and thrombolytic activity. The methanol extract of the plant indicated the presence of alkaloids, steroids and tannin. The plant exhibited significant cytotoxic effect on brine shrimp lethality bioassay, where the plant extracts showed LC50 of 0.074 μg/ml and LC90 of 4.85μg/ml after 2 hrs and later the all shrimp died after 4hrs at the same concentration. For the standard chloramphenicol LC50 and LC90 were found 2.56μg/ml and 4.82μg/ml respectively after 2hrs. After 4hrs LC50 and LC90 were found 1.772μg/ml and 4.364μg/ml respectively. The percentages of clot lyses were found 8.783% for test sample, 2.44% for blank and 80.43% for standard streptokinase in thrombolytic assay.


Khatun A.,Manarat International University | Rahman M.,Northern University of Bangladesh | Jahan S.,Manarat International University
Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine | Year: 2014

The methanol extract of leaves of traditionally used medicinal plant Murraya exotica Linn. (Family: Rutaceae) was evaluated for possible cytotoxic, thrombolytic and antioxidant activities in this study. The extract was tested for phytochemical group test by standard method using chromogenic reagents, in vivo brine shrimp lethality assay using Artemia salina, thrombolytic effect by using the standard streptokinase and antioxidant activity by using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH). The study revealed the presence of reducing sugars, tannins, saponins and alkaloids. The extract showed statistically significant (p < 0.01) potent cytotoxic effect in brine shrimp lethality bioassay where the value of LC50 and LC90 were 1.27 μg/ml and 5.09 μg/ml respectively compared with the standard vincristine sulphate with the value of LC50 and LC90 0.09 μg/ml and 4.83 μg/ml respectively after 24 h. The study gave a significant indication to the use of the plant extract as a potential source for cytotoxic compounds. The extract showed mild thrombolytic effect of 15.78 % thrombolytic activity whereas the standard streptokinase showed 76.50 ± 0.82 %. In the antioxidant activity study, the extract showed free radical scavenging activity where IC50 = 1.25 μg/ml and IC90 = 4.4 μg/ml, compared with the standard ascorbic acid showing IC50 = 0.01 μg/ml and IC90 = 3.58 μg/ml. Based on the findings of phytochemical, toxicological and anti-oxidative activity, it is evident that the plant may contain some novel compounds that possess potent anti-mutagenic and anti-oxidative activities. The obtained results support the use of this plant in traditional medicine. © 2014 Institute of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University.

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