Malta National Cancer Registry

Malta, Malta

Malta National Cancer Registry

Malta, Malta
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Holleczek B.,Saarland Cancer Registry | Rossi S.,Instituto Superiore Of Sanita | Domenic A.,Malta National Cancer Registry | Innos K.,National Institute for Health Development | And 5 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2015

Background Previous population-based studies revealed major variation in survival for patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) in Europe by age and between different countries and regions, but also a sustained improvement in survival for patients with CRC in recent years. This EUROCARE-5 paper aims to update available knowledge from previous studies and to provide the latest survival estimates for CRC patients from Europe. Methods The study analysed data of patients diagnosed with CRC from population-based cancer registries diagnosed in 29 European countries. Estimates of 1-year and 5-year relative survival (RS) were derived for patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 by European region, country and age at diagnosis. Additionally to these cohort estimates, time trends in 5-year RS were obtained for the calendar periods 1999-2001 and 2005-2007, using the period analysis methodology. Results European average 5-year RS for patients diagnosed with colon and rectum cancer was 57% and 56%, respectively. The analyses showed persistent differences in cancer survival across Europe with lowest survival for CRC patients observed in Eastern Europe. The analyses further showed a strong gradient in age-specific survival. Even though the study revealed sustained improvement in patient survival between 1999-2001 and 2005-2007 (absolute increase of 4 and 6 percentage points for colon and rectum, respectively), the differences in the survival for CRC patients observed at the beginning of the millennium persisted over time. Conclusion Although survival for CRC patients in Europe improved markedly in the study period, significant geographic variations and a strong age gradient still persisted. Enhanced access to effective diagnostic procedures and treatment options might be the keys to reducing the existing disparities in the survival of CRC patients across Europe. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.All rights reserved.


De Angelis R.,Instituto Superiore Of Sanita Iss | Minicozzi P.,Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori | Sant M.,Fondazione IRCCS Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori | Dal Maso L.,Italian National Cancer Institute | And 11 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2015

Background Significant advances in the management of patients with lymphoid and myeloid malignancies entered clinical practice in the early 2000's. The EUROCARE-5 study database provides an opportunity to assess the impact of these changes at the population level by country in Europe. We provide survival estimates for clinically relevant haematological malignancies (HM), using the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology 3, by country, gender and age in Europe. Methods We estimated age-standardised relative survival using the complete cohort approach for 625,000 adult patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008. Survival information was provided by 89 participating cancer registries from 29 European countries. Mean survival in Europe was calculated as the population weighted average of country-specific estimates. Results On average in Europe, 5-year relative survival was highest for Hodgkin lymphoma (81%; 40,625 cases), poorest for acute myeloid leukaemia (17%; 57,026 cases), and intermediate for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (59%; 329,204 cases), chronic myeloid leukaemia (53%; 17,713 cases) and plasma cell neoplasms (39%; 94,024 cases). Survival was generally lower in Eastern Europe and highest in Central and Northern Europe. Wider between country differences (>10%) were observed for malignancies that benefited from therapeutic advances, such as chronic myeloid leukaemia, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, follicular lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Lower differences (<10%) were observed for Hodgkin lymphoma. Conclusions Delayed or reduced access to innovative and appropriate therapies could plausibly have contributed to the observed geographical disparities between European regions and countries. Population based survival by morphological sub-type is important for measuring outcomes of HM management. To better inform quality of care research, the collection of detailed clinical information at the population level should be prioritised. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Austrian National Cancer Registry, Saarland Cancer Registry, Malta National Cancer Registry, National Institute for Health Development and 4 more.
Type: | Journal: European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990) | Year: 2015

Previous population-based studies revealed major variation in survival for patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) in Europe by age and between different countries and regions, but also a sustained improvement in survival for patients with CRC in recent years. This EUROCARE-5 paper aims to update available knowledge from previous studies and to provide the latest survival estimates for CRC patients from Europe.The study analysed data of patients diagnosed with CRC from population-based cancer registries diagnosed in 29 European countries. Estimates of 1-year and 5-year relative survival (RS) were derived for patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 by European region, country and age at diagnosis. Additionally to these cohort estimates, time trends in 5-year RS were obtained for the calendar periods 1999-2001 and 2005-2007, using the period analysis methodology.European average 5-year RS for patients diagnosed with colon and rectum cancer was 57% and 56%, respectively. The analyses showed persistent differences in cancer survival across Europe with lowest survival for CRC patients observed in Eastern Europe. The analyses further showed a strong gradient in age-specific survival. Even though the study revealed sustained improvement in patient survival between 1999-2001 and 2005-2007 (absolute increase of 4 and 6 percentage points for colon and rectum, respectively), the differences in the survival for CRC patients observed at the beginning of the millennium persisted over time.Although survival for CRC patients in Europe improved markedly in the study period, significant geographic variations and a strong age gradient still persisted. Enhanced access to effective diagnostic procedures and treatment options might be the keys to reducing the existing disparities in the survival of CRC patients across Europe.


PubMed | French Institute of Health and Medical Research, Italian National Cancer Institute, University of Girona, Malta National Cancer Registry and 7 more.
Type: | Journal: European journal of cancer (Oxford, England : 1990) | Year: 2015

Significant advances in the management of patients with lymphoid and myeloid malignancies entered clinical practice in the early 2000s. The EUROCARE-5 study database provides an opportunity to assess the impact of these changes at the population level by country in Europe. We provide survival estimates for clinically relevant haematological malignancies (HM), using the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology 3, by country, gender and age in Europe.We estimated age-standardised relative survival using the complete cohort approach for 625,000 adult patients diagnosed in 2000-2007 and followed up to 2008. Survival information was provided by 89 participating cancer registries from 29 European countries. Mean survival in Europe was calculated as the population weighted average of country-specific estimates.On average in Europe, 5-year relative survival was highest for Hodgkin lymphoma (81%; 40,625 cases), poorest for acute myeloid leukaemia (17%; 57,026 cases), and intermediate for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (59%; 329,204 cases), chronic myeloid leukaemia (53%; 17,713 cases) and plasma cell neoplasms (39%; 94,024 cases). Survival was generally lower in Eastern Europe and highest in Central and Northern Europe. Wider between country differences (>10%) were observed for malignancies that benefited from therapeutic advances, such as chronic myeloid leukaemia, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, follicular lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Lower differences (<10%) were observed for Hodgkin lymphoma.Delayed or reduced access to innovative and appropriate therapies could plausibly have contributed to the observed geographical disparities between European regions and countries. Population based survival by morphological sub-type is important for measuring outcomes of HM management. To better inform quality of care research, the collection of detailed clinical information at the population level should be prioritised.


Stiller C.A.,University of Oxford | Trama A.,Instituto Nazionale dei Tumori | Brewster D.H.,Scottish Cancer Registry | Verne J.,Public Health England | And 100 more authors.
Cancer Epidemiology | Year: 2014

Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a virus-related malignancy which most frequently arises in skin, though visceral sites can also be involved. Infection with Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV or HHV-8) is required for development of KS. Nowadays, most cases worldwide occur in persons who are immunosuppressed, usually because of HIV infection or as a result of therapy to combat rejection of a transplanted organ, but classic Kaposi sarcoma is predominantly a disease of the elderly without apparent immunosuppression. We analyzed 2667 KS incident cases diagnosed during 1995-2002 and registered by 75 population-based European cancer registries contributing to the RARECARE project. Total crude and age-standardized incidence rate was 0.3 per 100,000 per year with an estimated 1642 new cases per year in the EU27 countries. Age-standardized incidence rate was 0.8 per 100,000 in Southern Europe but below 0.3 per 100,000 in all other regions. The elevated rate in southern Europe was attributable to a combination of classic Kaposi sarcoma in some Mediterranean countries and the relatively high incidence of AIDS in several countries. Five-year relative survival for 2000-2002 by the period method was 75%. More than 10,000 persons were estimated to be alive in Europe at the beginning of 2008 with a past diagnosis of KS. The aetiological link with suppressed immunity means that many people alive following diagnosis of KS suffer comorbidity from a pre-existing condition. While KS is a rare cancer, it has a relatively good prognosis and so the number of people affected by it is quite large. Thus it provides a notable example of the importance of networking in diagnosis, therapy and research for rare cancers. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

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