Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Park Street, Canada

Gottinger A.M.,Mainstream Water Solutions Inc. | McMartin D.W.,University of Regina | Price D.,Mainstream Water Solutions Inc. | Hanson B.,Mainstream Water Solutions Inc.
Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering | Year: 2011

The following manuscript provides a technical review of slow sand filters (SSFs) as well as two case studies from the province of Saskatchewan, Canada in which an optimized technology has been successfully designed and implemented to produce high quality potable water for very small populations. Renewed interest in SSF systems for small communities has resulted in enhanced plant and filter design, improved operating procedures for increased efficiency and expanded range of acceptable raw water quality input and an overall low maintenance system design. Despite some limitations to the use of SSFs, recent design modifications and improvements for operation and maintenance of SSFs have expanded their application to a broader range of contaminants under highly variable environmental and operating conditions. The flexible and modular design options inherent to SSF systems, along with the modifications in expanded application, make SSFs highly attractive for potable water treatment in rural and remote regions. The SSFs designed and tested in Saskatchewan are modular polyethylene systems that include pre- and posttreatment processes such as ozone oxidation, roughing, and biological activated carbon (BAC) filters to provide significant reductions in turbidity, heavy metals, colour, and organics. Source


Gottinger A.M.,Mainstream Water Solutions Inc. | Gottinger A.M.,University of Regina | Wild D.J.,Mainstream Water Solutions Inc. | McMartin D.,University of Regina | And 2 more authors.
WIT Transactions on Ecology and the Environment | Year: 2010

The current study examined the use of a ZVI (zero valent iron)/sand filter for the removal of arsenic (As) from Canadian Prairie ground water sources. Batch isotherm data indicated a favourable reaction represented by the Langmuir isotherm equation with loading capacities of 5000 and 2000 mg As/kg ZVI. Column experiments using arsenate-spiked RO water (50 μg/L) and varying volumetric ratios of ZVI to sand indicated no statistical difference in arsenic-removal performance above a ZVI/sand ratio of 20/80 (%, v/v) with removal efficiencies of greater than 98%. A second column study using two ground water sources with 50/50 and 40/60 ZVI/sand filters achieved 89-96% As removal. A pilot study using a 50/50 ZVI/sand filter integrated into the existing small-scale biological system showed arsenic removal efficiency of approximately 99.7%. By incorporating this ZVI/sand filter into existing biological treatment, it was capable of removing As to concentrations below 0.1 μg/L and reducing the concentrations of other contaminants, such as ammonia, iron and manganese. The overall performance of the pilot system indicates the ZVI/sand filter is a viable option for arsenic removal from drinking water for small communities (populations < 5000). © 2010 WIT Press. Source


Gottinger A.M.,Mainstream Water Solutions Inc. | Gottinger A.M.,University of Regina | Gottinger A.M.,McAsphalt Industries Ltd | McMartin D.W.,University of Regina | And 2 more authors.
Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering | Year: 2013

The current work examines the pilot-scale activities required to utilize a zero valent iron (ZVI) sand bed, incorporated into a biological drinking water treatment system, to remove contaminants, particularly uranium (U) from a rural Canadian water well. Available technologies for U removal tend to be unsuitable for many small communities which lack resources. While ZVI has been acknowledged to be an attractive option, the technology has not achieved successful full-scale implementation. This work included a small-scale column and onsite pilot study. A loading capacity of 5962 mg U/kg ZVI was determined by column study. A ZVI sand filter integrated into a biological pilot system reduced contaminants to within acceptable standards, meeting our objectives including reducing U to <4 μg/L. Disposal of residuals (solid and liquid) was examined and the process was determined to be economically feasible and efficient. Source


Gottinger A.M.,Mainstream Water Solutions Inc. | Gottinger A.M.,University of Regina | McMartin D.W.,University of Regina | Price D.,Mainstream Water Solutions Inc. | Hanson B.,Mainstream Water Solutions Inc.
Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering | Year: 2011

The following manuscript provides a technical review of slow sand filters (SSFs) as well as two case studies from the province of Saskatchewan, Canada in which an optimized technology has been successfully designed and implemented to produce high quality potable water for very small populations. Renewed interest in SSF systems for small communities has resulted in enhanced plant and filter design, improved operating procedures for increased efficiency and expanded range of acceptable raw water quality input and an overall low maintenance system design. Despite some limitations to the use of SSFs, recent design modifications and improvements for operation and maintenance of SSFs have expanded their application to a broader range of contaminants under highly variable environmental and operating conditions. The flexible and modular design options inherent to SSF systems, along with the modifications in expanded application, make SSFs highly attractive for potable water treatment in rural and remote regions. The SSFs designed and tested in Saskatchewan are modular polyethylene systems that include pre- and posttreatment processes such as ozone oxidation, roughing, and biological activated carbon (BAC) filters to provide significant reductions in turbidity, heavy metals, colour, and organics. Source

Discover hidden collaborations