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Selvamani M.,MAHE Institute of Dental science and Hospital | Donoghue M.,Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology Center | Bharani S.,JKK Nataraja Dental College and Hospital | Madhushankari G.S.,JKK Nataraja Dental College and Hospital
Journal of Natural Science, Biology and Medicine | Year: 2015

Mucormycosis is an opportunistic fungal infection, more commonly observed in immunocompromised patients. The mode of infection is via the inhalation route and infection begins initially in the nose and paranasal sinuses with subsequent invasion into the vascular tissue, eventually leading to thrombosis and necrosis of nearby hard and soft tissues. Here, we report a case of chronic osteomyelitis of the maxillary bone with fungal infection (mucormycosis) and extensive tissue necrosis in an uncontrolled diabetes mellitus patient. Source


Ajila V.,NITTE University | Gopakumar R.,MAHE Institute of Dental science and Hospital | Hegde S.,NITTE University | Subhas Babu G.,NITTE University
Indian Journal of Sexually Transmitted Diseases | Year: 2012

Burkitt's lymphoma is an aggressive form of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma composed of malignant cells of B lymphocyte origin. Burkitt's lymphoma is a rarity in the Indian subcontinent. Though intraoral Burkitt's lymphoma in HIV positive individuals is very uncommon, its importance lies in the fact that it is often the first sign of the underlying immunosuppression. We present a case of Burkitt's lymphoma in right maxillary region which was the first manifestation of HIV in the patient. Source


Selvamani M.,MAHE Institute of Dental science and Hospital | Yamunadevi A.,Vivekanandha Dental College for Women | Basandi P.,JKK Nataraja Dental College and Hospital | Madhushankari G.,JKK Nataraja Dental College and Hospital
Journal of Pharmacy and Bioallied Sciences | Year: 2015

Aim: The aim was to determine the frequency and distribution of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) involving tongue among patients by studying biopsy specimens obtained from the archives of the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, College of Dental Sciences, Davangere, Karnataka, India, during the past 13 years. Methodology: Data for the study were retrieved from the case records of patients. Analyzed clinical variables included age, sex, anatomical site, and histological diagnosis. Results: Of the 369 squamous cell carcinoma involving head and neck region, we found 52 biopsies reported exclusively involving tongue. Lateral border of the tongue was most commonly involved (43 cases, 82.7%), followed by base of tongue and posterior part of tongue. The patient were affected over a wide range of 27-80 years with mean age of 55.75 years and peak incidence was seen in the fourth and fifth decades of life, with the male: female ratio of 1.7:1. Conclusion: The prevalence rate of OSCC involving tongue showed a definite geographic variation when compared with a study done in other parts of the world. © 2015 Journal of Pharmacy And Bioallied Sciences | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. Source


Madhushankari G.S.,JKK Nataraja Dental College and Hospital | Yamunadevi A.,Vivekanandha Dental College for Women | Selvamani M.,MAHE Institute of Dental science and Hospital | Mohan Kumar K.P.,JKK Nataraja Dental College and Hospital | Basandi P.S.,JKK Nataraja Dental College and Hospital
Journal of Pharmacy and Bioallied Sciences | Year: 2015

Halitosis is a condition where the breath is altered in an unpleasant manner for the affected individuals and impairs them socially as well as psychologically. Halitosis can be clinically classified as real halitosis, pseudohalitosis, and halitophobia. Real halitosis has oral and extra-oral etiologies and the pathophysiology involves interaction of anaerobic microbes (mainly) with the proteins present in the oral cavity fluids and contents, resulting in production of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs). These VSCs, beyond responsible for halitosis, can also initiate and accelerate periodontal disease progression. Thus, this review is about the pathophysiology and various etiologies of halitosis, the knowledge of which can help in the betterment of treatment options. © 2015 Journal of Pharmacy And Bioallied Sciences | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. Source


Annigeri R.G.,JKK Nataraja Dental College and Hospital | Shakunthala G.K.,MAHE Institute of Dental science and Hospital
Journal of Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences University | Year: 2015

Uremic Stomatitis (US) represents a comparatively uncommon intraoral complication seen, mostly, in cases of end-stage renal disease or undiagnosed or untreated chronic renal failure. Its frequency has diminished due to the advent of renal dialysis. Clinically uremic stomatitis is characterized by the presence of painful plaques and crusts that are usually distributed on the buccal and labial mucosa, dorsal or ventral surface of the tongue, gingiva, and floor of the mouth. Ultimate treatment consists of improvement of blood urea concentration and underlying renal failure is supported by enhancement of oral hygiene with antiseptic mouthwashes and antimicrobial/antifungal agents, if necessary. Here we report a rare case of ulcerative type of uremic stomatitis occurring in a patient of chronic renal failure due to sudden relapse of uremia and reviewed the possible pathophysiology of oral symptoms of chronic renal failure. © 2015 Journal of Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences University. Source

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