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Singh A.G.,Tribhuvan University | Kumar A.,CSIR - Central Electrochemical Research Institute | Tewari D.D.,Maharani Lal Kunwari Post Graduate College
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine | Year: 2012

Background: Nepal Himalayas have been known as a rich source for valuable medicinal plants since Vedic periods. Present work is the documentation of indigenous knowledge on plant utilization as natural remedy by the inhabitants of terai forest in Western Nepal.Methods: Study was conducted during 2010-2011 following standard ethnobotanical methods. Data about medicinal uses of plants were collected by questionnaire, personal interview and group discussion with pre identified informants. Voucher specimens were collected with the help of informants, processed into herbarium following standard methods, identified with the help of pertinent floras and taxonomic experts, and submitted in Department of Botany, Butwal Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Nepal for future references.Results: During the present study 66 medicinal plant species belonging to 37 families and 60 genera has been documented. These plants were used to treat various diseases and ailments grouped under 11 disease categories, with the highest number of species (41) being used for gastro-intestinal disorders, followed by dermatological disorders (34). In the study area the informants' consensus about usages of medicinal plants ranges from 0.93 to 0.97 with an average value of 0.94. Herbs (53%) were the primary source of medicine, followed by trees (23%). Curcuma longa (84%) and Azadirachta indica (76%) are the most frequently and popularly used medicinal plant species in the study area. Acacia catechu, Bacopa monnieri, Bombax ceiba, Drymaria diandra, Rauvolfia serpentina, and Tribulus terrestris are threatened species which needs to be conserved for future use.Conclusions: The high degree of consensus among the informants suggests that current use and knowledge are still strong, and thus the preservation of today's knowledge shows good foresight in acting before much has been lost. The connections between plant use and conservation are also important ones, especially as the authors note that neither the local inhabitants nor the government is addressing the potential loss of valuable species in this region. © 2012 Singh et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Singhal K.,University of Lucknow | Sahu V.K.,Maharani Lal Kunwari Post Graduate College | Singh P.,K S Saket Post Graduate College | Raj P.,University of Lucknow
Medicinal Chemistry Research | Year: 2014

Perfluorophenyl antimony(III) and antimony(V) chlorides experimentally scanned earlier for antifungal activity against Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger, and insecticidal activity viz., contact toxicity, stomach toxicity, antifeedant activity and acaricidal activity against Spodoptera litura and Tetranychus urticae of mites. These activities have been theoretically predicted by DFT method using B88-LYP GGA energy functional with DZVP basis set. Comparison of the experimental values and the values obtained by theoretical calculations has been presented pictorially and shows close resemblance. © Springer Science+Business Media 2013. Source


Kumar A.,Maharani Lal Kunwari Post Graduate College | Kumar A.,CSIR - Central Electrochemical Research Institute | Pandey V.C.,Maharani Lal Kunwari Post Graduate College | Pandey V.C.,Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University | Tewari D.D.,Maharani Lal Kunwari Post Graduate College
Tropical Animal Health and Production | Year: 2012

Purpose: The aim of the present investigation was to document the phytotherapeutic knowledge and veterinary healthcare management practices among the Tharu tribal community of Uttar Pradesh, India and to determine the consensus of such practices, in order to evaluate the potential for new veterinary drugs of herbal origin. Methods: This study was conducted in 2000-2004 using semistructured, open-ended questionnaires, informal interviews and group discussions with farmers engaged in animal husbandry. Results: In the present study, 59 phytotherapeutic practices using 48 plant species were documented for management of 18 types of healthcare problems of domesticated animals. Crude drug formulations keep the animal healthy, increase lactation, and reduce estrus interval and puberty period to make them economically more important. There was great agreement among informants regarding phytotherapeutic uses of medicinal plants with factor of informants' consensus (F IC) value ranging from 0.84 to 1, with an average value of 0.94. Conclusion: Study reveals that there is great agreement among informants for the usages of Azadirachta indica A Juss, Bombax ceiba L, Bambusa arundinacea (Retz) Willd, Corianderum sativum L, Cuscuta reflexa Roxb, Datura metal L, Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn, and Parthenium hysterophorus L. These species may be used for the development of new, cheep, effective, and eco-friendly herbal formulations for veterinary healthcare management. Further investigation of these herbal formulations for veterinary healthcare management will require safety and efficacy testing. There is an urgent need to formulate suitable conservation strategies for wildly growing phytotherapeutics to overcome their depletion from natural resources and to make these practices more eco-friendly. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. Source


Kumar A.,Maharani Lal Kunwari Post Graduate College | Kumar A.,CSIR - Central Electrochemical Research Institute | Pandey V.C.,Maharani Lal Kunwari Post Graduate College | Pandey V.C.,Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University | And 3 more authors.
Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution | Year: 2013

The aim of present study was to explore and document medicinal plants used for the traditional dermatological healthcare management practices by the the Tharu tribal community of Uttar Pradesh. The study was conducted during 2000-2004. Information was gathered from 230 informants residing in 46 villages in Terai region of Indo-Nepal boarder using questionnaires; oral interviews and group discussions. Total 92 medicinal plant species were cited for the preparation of 113 crude drug formulations. Voucher specimens of cited plant species were collected and identified as belonging to 82 genera and 49 families. Thirty-nine medicinal plant species were reported for the first time for dermatological healthcare problems from India. The dermatological healthcare problems managed were cut and wounds, ringworm, leprosy, eczema, scabies, leucoderma, boils, carbuncles, pimples, skin blemishes, spots, eruption, and burns etc. The most commonly and popularly used medicinal plant species for management of dermatological healthcare problems in the study area were Curcumalonga L., Azadirachtaindica A. Juss and Meliaazedarach L. It is concluded that dermatological healthcare management practice in the study area depends largely on wildly growing medicinal plant species. There is an urgent need to properly conserve the medicinal plant species growing in this area for human welfare. There is also need for further phytopharmacological studies to provide scientific explanation for the usages of 57 medicinal plant species for which to the best of our knowledge phytopharmacological literatures are not available. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Source


Pandey V.C.,Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University | Singh J.S.,Babasaheb Bhimrao Ambedkar University | Kumar A.,Maharani Lal Kunwari Post Graduate College | Tewari D.D.,Maharani Lal Kunwari Post Graduate College
Clean - Soil, Air, Water | Year: 2010

Chickpea grown in fly ash (FA) treated soil (25, 50, and 100% FA) was used to evaluate the effect of FA on antioxidants, metal concentration (Fe, Zn, Cu, Cr, and Cd), photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a (chl-a), chlorophyll b (chl-b), total chlorophyll (total chl), and carotenoids), growth and yield performance. All antioxidants in roots, shoots and leaves of chickpea increase with increasing FA doses to combat FA stress. The activities of antioxidants were more in the root tissues to cope with stress induced in the plants as compared to shoot and leaf. Concentration of metals was found maximum in roots than the shoots and seeds. The highest concentration of Fe and lowest level of Cd were recorded in all treatments of FA for different parts of the plant. The treated crop showed reduced level of chlorophyll but enhanced level of carotenoids and protein. However, root length, number of nodules and biomass in 25 and 50% FA treatments did not differ significantly in comparison to respective control plants. These results suggest that heavy metals of FA causes oxidative stress in this crop and the antioxidant enzymes could help a pivotal role against oxidative injury.Chickpea grown in fly ash (FA) treated soil (25 and 50%) did not show any significant reduction in plant growth and yield compared to control plants. However, the plant growth and yield was significantly reduced in 100% FA. Roots showed the highest metal concentration whereas the highest concentration of Fe and lowest levels of Cd were recorded in all FA treatments for different parts of the plant. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Source

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