MAGI non profit Human Medical Genetics Institute

Rovereto, Italy

MAGI non profit Human Medical Genetics Institute

Rovereto, Italy

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Marku E.,University of Tirana | Maltese P.E.,MAGI Non Profit Human Medical Genetics Institute | Koni M.,University of Tirana | Capodicasa N.,Catholic University Our Lady of Good Counsel | And 4 more authors.
Genetics and Molecular Research | Year: 2015

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the infectious agent of both acute and chronic hepatitis. HBV exists in multiple genotypic variants that differ in their capacity to become persistent chronic infections and in their clinical manifestations, including hepatocellular carcinoma. The 8 genotypes (A-H) of HBV show a specific worldwide geographic distribution and are correlated with different disease course, severity, and response to therapy. We isolated DNA from 75 HBV-positive blood donors, chosen randomly from the database of the National Blood Bank in Tirana, to specifically analyze the UGT1A1 polymorphism to determine its correlations with bilirubin levels and liver function. The large number of subjects who were HBV-positive carriers of heterozygosis or homozygosis for the UGT1A1*28 (TA)7 polymorphism suggests that these individuals may be more susceptible to cancer and should follow a strict regime of prevention. ©FUNPEC-RP.


Tavian D.,Catholic University of the Sacred Heart | Missaglia S.,Catholic University of the Sacred Heart | Maltese P.E.,MAGI Non Profit Human Medical Genetics Institute | Michelini S.,San Giovanni Battista Hospital | And 5 more authors.
Oncotarget | Year: 2016

Dominant mutations in the FOXC2 gene cause a form of lymphedema primarily of the limbs that usually develops at or after puberty. In 90-95% of patients, lymphedema is accompanied by distichiasis. FOXC2 is a member of the forkhead/winged-helix family of transcription factors and plays essential roles in different developmental pathways and physiological processes. We previously described six unrelated families with primary lymphedema-distichiasis in which patients showed different FOXC2 mutations located outside of the forkhead domain. Of those, four were missense mutations, one a frameshift mutation, and the last a stop mutation. To assess their pathogenic potential, we have now examined the subcellular localization and the transactivation activity of the mutated FOXC2 proteins. All six FOXC2 mutant proteins were able to localize into the nucleus; however, the frameshift truncated protein appeared to be sequestered into nuclear aggregates. A reduction in the ability to activate FOXC1/FOXC2 response elements was detected in 50% of mutations, while the remaining ones caused an increase of protein transactivation activity. Our data reveal that either a complete loss or a significant gain of FOXC2 function can cause a perturbation of lymphatic vessel formation leading to lymphedema.


PubMed | San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, University of Alberta, MAGI Non Profit Human Medical Genetics Institute and Medicina Riabilitativa
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Oncotarget | Year: 2016

Dominant mutations in the FOXC2 gene cause a form of lymphedema primarily of the limbs that usually develops at or after puberty. In 90-95% of patients, lymphedema is accompanied by distichiasis. FOXC2 is a member of the forkhead/winged-helix family of transcription factors and plays essential roles in different developmental pathways and physiological processes. We previously described six unrelated families with primary lymphedema-distichiasis in which patients showed different FOXC2 mutations located outside of the forkhead domain. Of those, four were missense mutations, one a frameshift mutation, and the last a stop mutation. To assess their pathogenic potential, we have now examined the subcellular localization and the transactivation activity of the mutated FOXC2 proteins. All six FOXC2 mutant proteins were able to localize into the nucleus; however, the frameshift truncated protein appeared to be sequestered into nuclear aggregates. A reduction in the ability to activate FOXC1/FOXC2 response elements was detected in 50% of mutations, while the remaining ones caused an increase of protein transactivation activity. Our data reveal that either a complete loss or a significant gain of FOXC2 function can cause a perturbation of lymphatic vessel formation leading to lymphedema.


PubMed | Mellino Mellini Hospital, MAGI Non Profit Human Medical Genetics Institute, University of Pavia and Krasnoyarsk State Medical University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Genetics and molecular research : GMR | Year: 2016

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disease that can seriously impair ones quality of life; patients complain of excessive fatigue and myalgia following physical exertion. This disease may be associated with abnormalities in genes affecting exercise tolerance and physical performance. Adenosine monophosphate deaminase (AMPD1), carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT2), and the muscle isoform of glycogen phosphorylase (PYGM) genes provide instructions for producing enzymes that play major roles in energy production during work. The aim of this study was to look for evidence of genotype-associated excessive muscle fatigue. Three metabolic genes (AMPD1, CPT2, and PYGM) were therefore fully sequenced in 17 Italian patients with CFS. We examined polymorphisms known to alter the function of these metabolic genes, and compared their genotypic distributions in CFS patients and 50 healthy controls using chi-square tests and odds ratios. One-way analysis of variance with F-ratio was carried out to determine the associations between genotypes and disease severity using CF scores. No major genetic variations between patients and controls were found in the three genes studied, and we did not find any association between these genes and CFS. In conclusion, variations in AMPD1, CPT2, and PGYM genes are not associated with the onset, susceptibility, or severity of CFS.


PubMed | MAGI Non Profit Human Medical Genetics Institute, University of Siena, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart and UO Dietetica Medica
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Genetics and molecular research : GMR | Year: 2016

Obesity is a major public health concern; despite evidence of high heritability, the genetic causes of obesity remain unclear. In this study, we assessed the presence of mutations in three genes involved in the hypothalamic leptin-melanocortin regulation pathway (leptin, LEP; leptin receptor, LEPR; and melanocortin-4 receptor, MC4R), which is important for energy homeostasis in the body, in a group of patients with severe obesity. For this study, we selected 77 patients who had undergone bariatric surgery and had a pre-operative body mass index (BMI) >35 kg/m


Persi A.,MAGI Non Profit Human Medical Genetics Institute | Maltese P.E.,MAGI Non Profit Human Medical Genetics Institute | Bertelli M.,MAGI Non Profit Human Medical Genetics Institute | Cecchin S.,MAGI Non Profit Human Medical Genetics Institute | And 8 more authors.
Panminerva Medica | Year: 2013

Aim: The R577X polymorphism of the alpha-actinin-3 (ACTN3) gene and the IVS1-6G>A polymorphism of the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) gene have been associated with a favourable muscle phenotype (more muscle fibres with high glycolytic activity), reduced predisposition for congenital dystrophy and resistance to sarcopenia in old age. The aim of this study was to look for evidence of selective pressure towards genotypes favourable for strong muscle activity in a sample of national-level Italian athletes. Methods: We analysed two stop codon polymorphisms in the DNA of 50 Italian athletes, specialised in power or endurance sports, and compared their genotypic distribution with those of a population of 50 controls. In a representative sub-group of athletes (N.=42) we then compared the genetic data with anaerobic threshold, assessed by an incremental exercise test up to exhaustion. Results. The athlete group showed an allelic distribution of ACTN3 (R/R:64%, R/X:16%, X/X:20%) and CNTF (G/G:72%, G/A:26%, A/A:2%), significantly imbalanced towards alleles R/R and G/G, respectively, compared to controls (ACTN3=R/R:40% R/X:22% X/X:38% and CNTF=G/G:52%, G/A:24%, A/A:24%) (p=0.0024 and p=0.0001, respectively). Only the ACTN3 577X/X polymorphism showed a significant association with the anaerobic threshold of athletes (F-ratio= 4.037; p=0.025). Factorial ANOVA demonstrated a non significant interaction between favourable allelic patterns of ACTN3 and CNTF genes on aerobic performance in the athlete group. Conclusion: The relationship found between favourable muscle phenotype and this genetic profile may have interesting implications in sport performance and training, athlete selection and different clinical activities, such as physical rehabilitation and modifying phenotypes associated with neuromuscular diseases.


Michelini S.,San Giovanni Battista Hospital ACISMOM | Cardone M.,San Giovanni Battista Hospital ACISMOM | Haag O Agga M.,San Giovanni Battista Hospital ACISMOM | Bruson A.,MAGI Non Profit Human Medical Genetics Institute | And 3 more authors.
Lymphology | Year: 2016

Emberger syndrome, or primary lymphedema with myelodysplasia, is a severe rare disease characterized by early primary lymphedema and blood anomalies including acute childhood leukemia. The syndrome is associated with heterozygous mutations in the GATA2 gene. We report on a 13-year-old boy who developed lymphedema of the right lower limb at age 6 years which was accompanied by severe panleukopenia and repeated episodes of erysipelas. The suspicion of Emberger syndrome was confirmed by detection of a new germinal line GATA2 mutation c.414-417del, p.Ser139Cysfs&z.ast;78. Clinical treatment included a bone marrow transplant from the father. This case is one of a very limited number of Emberger syndrome cases documented in the literature, and genetic testing proved fundamental for definition of the condition and its association with a de novo mutation in the GATA2 which is reported here for the first time.


De Polo L.,University of Milan | Maltese P.E.,MAGI non profit Human Medical Genetics Institute | Rigoni E.,MAGI non profit Human Medical Genetics Institute | Bertelli M.,MAGI non profit Human Medical Genetics Institute | And 3 more authors.
Genetics and Molecular Research | Year: 2015

In this study, we assessed the prevalence of polymorphisms in genes involved in hyperhomocysteinemia or hemostasis to shed light on their role, if any, in retinal vein occlusion (RVO). We recruited 37 Italian patients (17 men and 20 women) with a diagnosis of central or branch RVO based on fundus examination and retinal fluorescein angiography, as well as 45 healthy controls. Risk factors and family history of RVO of all subjects were recorded. The distributions of polymorphisms in patients and controls were evaluated using the X2 test and OR. We confirmed an increased risk in subjects with dyslipidemia (high density lipoprotein <59 mg/dL: 17.8% of controls, 43.2% of patients, P = 0.0002; low density lipoprotein >130 mg/dL: 26.7% controls, 54.1% patients, P = 0.0002), arterial hypertension (60% controls, 75.7% patients, P = 0.023), and high body mass index (28.9% controls, 70.3% patients, P < 0.0001, and excluded involvement of the selected polymorphisms in RVO. Overall, the tested polymorphisms did not appear to be useful for assessing predisposition or for the diagnosis and prognosis of RVO. © FUNPEC-RP.


PubMed | University of Trento, MAGI non profit Human Medical Genetics Institute and University of Milan
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Genetics and molecular research : GMR | Year: 2015

In this study, we assessed the prevalence of polymorphisms in genes involved in hyperhomocysteinemia or hemostasis to shed light on their role, if any, in retinal vein occlusion (RVO). We recruited 37 Italian patients (17 men and 20 women) with a diagnosis of central or branch RVO based on fundus examination and retinal fluorescein angiography, as well as 45 healthy controls. Risk factors and family history of RVO of all subjects were recorded. The distributions of polymorphisms in patients and controls were evaluated using the (2) test and OR. We confirmed an increased risk in subjects with dyslipidemia (high density lipoprotein <59 mg/dL: 17.8% of controls, 43.2% of patients, P = 0.0002; low density lipoprotein >130 mg/dL: 26.7% controls, 54.1% patients, P = 0.0002), arterial hypertension (60% controls, 75.7% patients, P = 0.023), and high body mass index (28.9% controls, 70.3% patients, P < 0.0001, and excluded involvement of the selected polymorphisms in RVO. Overall, the tested polymorphisms did not appear to be useful for assessing predisposition or for the diagnosis and prognosis of RVO.


PubMed | MAGI Non Profit Human Medical Genetics Institute
Type: | Journal: International heart journal | Year: 2016

Long QT syndrome (LQTS) has great genetic heterogeneity: more than 500 mutations have been described in several genes. Despite many advances, a genetic diagnosis still cannot be established in 25-30% of patients. The aim of the present study was to perform genetic evaluation in 9 Russian families with LQTS; here we report the results of 4 positive probands and their relatives (a total of 16 individuals). All subjects underwent clinical examination, 12-lead ECG, and Holter monitoring. Genetic analysis of the 14 genes mainly involved in LQTS was performed using a next-generation sequencing approach. We identified two new mutations (KCNQ1 gene) and 6 known mutations (AKAP9, ANK2, KCNE1 and KCNJ2 genes) in 4 out of 9 probands, some of which have already been described in association with LQTS. Segregation studies suggest a possible causative role for KCNQ1 p.(Leu342Pro), AKAP9 p.(Arg1609Lys), KCNE1 p.(Asp85Asn), and KCNJ2 p.(Arg82Gln) variations. Our study confirmed the high genetic heterogeneity of this disease and highlights the difficulties to reveal clear pathogenic genotypes also in large pedigrees. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first genetic study of LQTS patients from Russian families.

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