Chiang Mai, Thailand
Chiang Mai, Thailand

Maejo University in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand, is the oldest agricultural institution in the country. Founded in 1934 as the Northern Agricultural Teachers Training School, it was restructured and renamed several times until it gained the status of a full-fledged public university in 1996 and since then has been known as Maejo University.Maejo University main campus at Chiang Mai is composed of the faculties of Business, Economics, Liberal Arts, Tourism Development, Information Technology, Fisheries Technology and Aquatic Resources, Animal science and Technology, Renewable Energy, Administrative, Landscape and Environmental Design, Agricultural Production, Science, and Engineering and Agro-Industry. In addition to these, the university has two smaller campuses in Phrae and Chumphon. Wikipedia.


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Narksitipan S.,Maejo University
Materials Science Forum | Year: 2017

In this research, zinc oxide (ZnO) films were prepared by thermal evaporation method at temperature between 400-600°C for 60 min. Then, ZnO films were deposited by nitrogen cold plasma technique. The power, frequency and voltage of plasma generated at 100 W, 50 KHz and 5 KV, respectively. These films were deposited by plasma deposition for 15-60 min. The aim of this research is to study the effect of nitrogen plasma on the crystalline structure and optical properties of ZnO film. Crystalline structure, elemental compositions, morphological and optical properties were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UV-VIS spectrophotometer, respectively. It was found that the ZnO films preparation via thermal evaporation method at temperature of 500°C showed the highest crystalline with hexagonal structure. After plasma deposition for 15, 30 and 60 min, ZnO films were amorphous. Optical transmittance values decreased and the optical band gap decreased from 3.14 to 3.06 eV with increasing in the plasma time. © 2017 Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.


News Article | March 24, 2016
Site: phys.org

Speaking of the unique anatomical structures seen in the cavefish, Cryptotora thamicola, NJIT's Brooke Flammang says, "It possesses morphological features that have previously only been attributed to tetrapods. The pelvis and vertebral column of this fish allow it to support its body weight against gravity and provide large sites for muscle attachment for walking." With respect to evolutionary significance, she adds, "This research gives us insight into the plasticity of the fish body plan and the convergent morphological features that were seen in the evolution of tetrapods." Credit: NJIT Researchers from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) have identified unique anatomical features in a species of blind, walking cavefish in Thailand that enable the fish to walk and climb waterfalls in a manner comparable to tetrapods, or four-footed mammals and amphibians. The discovery of this capability, not seen in any other living fishes, also has implications for understanding how the anatomy that all species need to walk on land evolved after the transition from finned to limbed appendages in the Devonian period, which began some 420 million years ago. This research is reported in a March 24 Scientific Reports article, "Tetrapod-like pelvic girdle in a walking cavefish," by Brooke E. Flammang, Daphne Soares, Julie Markiewicz and Apinun Suvarnaraksha. Flammang and Soares, assistant professors in the NJIT Department of Biological Sciences, were assisted with the research by Markiewicz, an NJIT post-baccalaureate research volunteer in the Flammang lab at the university. Investigator Suvarnaraksha is a member of the Faculty of Fisheries Technology and Aquatic Resources of Maejo University in Thailand. Speaking of the unique anatomical structures seen in the cavefish, Cryptotora thamicola, Flammang says, "It possesses morphological features that have previously only been attributed to tetrapods. The pelvis and vertebral column of this fish allow it to support its body weight against gravity and provide large sites for muscle attachment for walking." With respect to evolutionary significance, she adds, "This research gives us insight into the plasticity of the fish body plan and the convergent morphological features that were seen in the evolution of tetrapods." More information: Brooke E. Flammang et al. Tetrapod-like pelvic girdle in a walking cavefish, Scientific Reports (2016). DOI: 10.1038/srep23711


Phat V.N.,Institute of Mathematics | Ratchagit K.,Maejo University
Nonlinear Analysis: Hybrid Systems | Year: 2011

This paper deals with stability and stabilization of a class of switched discrete-time delay systems. The system to be considered is subject to interval time-varying delays, which allows the delay to be a fast time-varying function and the lower bound is not restricted to zero. Based on the discrete Lyapunov functional, a switching rule for the asymptotic stability and stabilization for the system is designed via linear matrix inequalities. Numerical examples are included to illustrate the effectiveness of the results. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Rajchakit G.,Maejo University
International Journal of Nonlinear Sciences and Numerical Simulation | Year: 2013

This paper is concerned with asymptotic stability and stabilization of nonlinear uncertain stochastic switched discrete time-delay systems. The system to be considered is subject to interval time-varying delays, which allows the delay to be a fast time-varying function and the lower bound is not restricted to zero. Based on the discrete Lyapunov functional, a switching rule for the asymptotic stability and stabilization for the nonlinear uncertain stochastic discrete time-delay system is designed via linear matrix inequalities. Numerical examples are included to illustrate the effectiveness of the results.


Rajchakit G.,Maejo University
Applied Mechanics and Materials | Year: 2013

This paper deals with the problem of delay-dependent stability criterion of discrete-time recurrent neural networks with time-varying delays. Based on quadratic Lyapunov functional approach and free-weighting matrix approach, some linear matrix inequality criteria are found to guarantee delay-dependent asymptotical stability of these systems. And one example illustrates the exactness of the proposed criteria. © (2013) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.


Rajchakit G.,Maejo University
2012 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Biomimetics, ROBIO 2012 - Conference Digest | Year: 2012

This paper is concerned with exponential stability of switched linear systems with interval time-varying delays. The time delay is any continuous function belonging to a given interval. By constructing a suitable augmented Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional combined with Leibniz-Newton's formula, a switching rule for the exponential stability of switched linear systems with interval time-varying delays and new delay-dependent sufficient conditions for the exponential stability of the systems are first established in terms of LMIs. Numerical example is included to illustrate the effectiveness of the results. © 2012 IEEE.


Thirabunyanon M.,Maejo University
Maejo International Journal of Science and Technology | Year: 2011

The microbiota in the human intestine play an important function in human health and disease. Gastrointestinal infections by foodborne pathogens are a main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Such infections can be caused by contaminated foods or other sources which come in contact with human intestinal epithelial cells. In recent years, probiotics have been recommended as alternative biotherapeutic agents against intestinal pathogenic infections. Two genera of probiotics, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, are commercially valuable applications, several forms of which are available as capsules or in functional food products such as yogurt, fermented juices and sausages. Probiotics protect against gastrointestinal pathogenic infection via several mechanisms. These include production of antimicrobial substances, competition for nutrient substrates, competitive exclusion, enhancement of intestinal barrier function, and immunomodulation. Probiotic bacteria have been documented as being effective in biotherapeutic applications against gastrointestinal pathogens, e.g. Helicobacter pylori, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and rotaviruses. This alternative therapeutic application of probiotics to protect against gastrointestinal pathogenic infections may be of great importance for future medicinal use. © 2011 by Maejo University, San Sai, Chiang Mai, 50290 Thailand.


Rajchakit G.,Maejo University
Applied Mathematics and Information Sciences | Year: 2012

This paper is concerned with robust stability and stabilization of nonlinear uncertain stochastic switched discrete time-delay systems. The system to be considered is subject to interval time-varying delays, which allows the delay to be a fast time-varying function and the lower bound is not restricted to zero. Based on the discrete Lyapunov functional, a switching rule for the robust stability and stabilization for the nonlinear uncertain stochastic discrete time-delay system is designed via linear matrix inequalities. Numerical examples are included to illustrate the effectiveness of the results. © 2012 NSP Natural Sciences Publishing Cor.


Schistura maejotigrina, new species, is described from Maechaem River, a tributary of Ping River, in the upper Chao Phra-ya River drainage, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. It is distinguished from all other species of Schistura in having 21-24 dark tiger-stripe black bars on the side of the body and 6 1/2-7 1/2 branched dorsal soft rays. The species is medium-sized, reaching 53.0 mm SL (69.6 mm TL), and is known only from the Maechaem River system, Ping River drainage, northern Chao Phraya River basin, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. It lives in fast running, clear water over a substrate of mixed gravel, small stone and sand. Copyright © 2001-2012 Magnolia Press.


News Article | March 26, 2016
Site: www.techtimes.com

Discovery of a blind cavefish that walks on land sheds light on the evolution of tetrapods, scientists said. The small, one-of-a-kind fish found in Thailand may help experts understand better how life evolved on Earth, how species that live in dark places are able to forage, mate and do other activities. Ultimately, it could provide insight into how past water dwellers developed into species that walk on land. The walking fish that has been making a buzz worldwide is the Cryptotora thamicola. Also called waterfall-climbing cave fish, this animal uses its four fins to "walk" on rocks and climb wet walls. One of the most interesting discoveries of the researchers is that the fish has a complete set of pelvic bones attached to its spine - something that is not present in any other 30,000 species of fish all over the world. Such characteristic is notably present in today's vertebrates living on land and in ancient tetrapods as seen in unearthed fossils. With this, the fish may serve as an extraordinary key to discovering more things about species evolution. The waterfall-climbing cave fish was first found in 1985 in eight caves located in Northern Thailand, near the border of Myanmar. At present, the government has become overprotective of this area, limiting experts who are able to go to the caves to do research work. A Look Back At The History Of Tetrapods The first vertebrates that were able to walk on land were tetrapods, which had four limbs. Despite this knowledge, experts remained unsuccessful in looking for intermediate species that can demonstrate how some fish evolved to land-walkers. Although the blind waterfall-climbing cave fish is unlikely to be a part of the family of the earliest tetrapods, its evolution surely gives a luminous spark for scientists so they could better understand how other species were able to move on land. In 2015, Apinun Suvarnaraksha from Thailand's Maejo University and Daphne Soares from New Jersey Institute of Technology set off to the caves where the waterfall-climbing cave fish can be found and took a video of it. The video got the interest of Soares' colleague Brooke Flammang, who could not believe that fish can do such a thing as walking. Flammang then started working with Suvarnaraksha, who was able to return to the cave to get more information. Suvarnaraksha caught the fish, placed it in an aquarium, filmed it and released it afterwards. He was also able to do a CT scan of a preserved specimen to add to his research materials. Flammang was still stunned upon receiving the new data and doing the analysis, pointing to the CT scan image of the huge pelvis, which does not look like a fish pelvis at all. "The pelvis and vertebral column of this fish allow it to support its body weight against gravity and provide large sites for muscle attachment for walking," she says. Ultimately, Flammang says the research gives information about how adaptable the structure of the fish body is and how these features come close to the previously discovered evolution of tetrapods. The study was published in the journal Scientific Reports on Thursday.

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