Long Beach, CA, United States
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Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 124.99K | Year: 2015

We propose the development of a modern panel code for calculation of steady and unsteady aerodynamic loads needed for dynamic servoelastic (DSE) analysis of flight vehicles. The code will be especially tailored to be robust, reliable, and integrated with the NASA Object Oriented Optimization (O3) system through selection of analysis methods, file formats, and computing environment, allowing it to be efficiently applied to numerous problems of interest to NASA and industry.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.96K | Year: 2016

We propose the development of a novel aerodynamic modeling approach making use of fully unstructured grids for unsteady panel aerodynamic models for aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic analysis. The unsteady aerodynamic code will be integrated with an existing suite of aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic analysis tools making it possible to perform aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic analysis of complex vehicles with a significant reduction in user effort and improvement in fidelity.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.82K | Year: 2015

In aircraft design, reducing structural weight is often a prime objective, while various constraints in multiple disciplines, such as structure, aerodynamics and aeroelasticity should be imposed on the aircraft. Therefore, engineers need optimization tools to incorporate the multidisciplinary constraints using appropriate fidelity during the early stages of concept design. Classic structural design of aircraft structures is based on the concept of a "wing box" that uses simple components such as straight spars and ribs, quadrilateral wing skin panels and straight stiffeners. A new design philosophy, using curvilinear SpaRibs has been introduced based on emerging manufacturing technologies such as Electron Beam Free Form Fabrication and Friction Stir Welding (FSW). In those innovative technologies, the wing structure is manufactured as an integrated part instead of using mechanically fastened structural components. This design approach makes it possible to design curved substructure that is a hybrid between spars and ribs, therefore called "SpaRibs". These can be designed to have favorable coupling between bending and torsion, and can improve the buckling resistance of local panels. The ability to tailor the bend-twist coupling has been shown to offer substantial improvement in aeroelastic behavior without a weight penalty (or alternately, a weight savings without aeroelastic problems). In this program we will advance this technology to a TRL of 5-6 (or to 6-7 in a Phase III) by designing a subsonic transport wing with better aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic performance, and by designing a test article and test program suitable for proving the performance benefits in flight.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.88K | Year: 2015

ABSTRACT:This proposal effort seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of developing a methodology for propagating measurement errors through common modal parameter estimation algorithms and assurance criterion. This effort will leverage existing uncertainty quantification and modal parameter estimation software. Two modal parameter estimation algorithms and two uncertainty propagation techniques will be considered during the Phase I program. An experimental and simulation (finite element) model will be constructed, tested, and analyzed using the proposed methodology. Additionally, the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed tool as well as important feedback and key learning lessons will be reported in the form a feasibility study.BENEFIT:Potential applications will include the use of the developed software to assist in the verification, validation and accreditation (VV&A) of any experimental modal analysis. An additional benefit includes the ability to analyze unit-to-unit variation in any mass produced component where structural dynamic considerations are important. Generic to any system requiring VV&A for experimental modal analysis, the developed software could be utilized by commercial companies such as Boeing, Lockheed Martin, and Northrop Grumman.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 124.95K | Year: 2016

M4 Engineering proposes to develop methods and software to generate reduced order nonlinear models of dynamic aeroserovelastic systems. The reduced order models will be based on a hybrid NARMAX-Wavelet model, in which the basic linear behavior and gentle nonlinearities in the dynamics are captured by a Nonlinear AutoRegressive, Moving Average with eXogenous inputs (NARMAX) model with polynomial behavior, and harsh nonlinearities that result localized discontinuities or transitions are captured with a Wavelet network. This approach will allow the system to capture the range of nonlinear dynamics encountered in complex DASE systems with very efficient models suitable for use early in the design cycle.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 911.40K | Year: 2016

During Phase I and Phase II, M4 Engineering, Inc. and Sandia National Laboratories have created a unique bonded joint analysis methodology and associated software. During Phase II.5, the developed techniques will be further enhanced and a fully functional commercial analysis code (SIMULIA/Abaqus) plug-in will be created. The software plug-in will make the advanced technology accessible to all levels of practicing engineers via integrated pre- and post-processing modules. The technology is based upon a world class nonlinear constitutive equation for polymers developed over a decade at Sandia. A two-pronged approach consisting of concise surrogate models (i.e., traction-separation interface models) for design and analysis and high fidelity models that can be used along with experimental data for surrogate model parameterization will provide the Navy a comprehensive bond modeling method. During Phase I and Phase II, ductile and brittle adhesives for metal bonding have been studied. The upcoming Phase II.5 work will include looking at an additional adhesive, as well as composite substrates. Hence, a key part of this work will also include an experimental program to populate the high fidelity models and validate the surrogate traction-separation models.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.94K | Year: 2015

Approaches for weight prediction, in the conceptual design phase, typically consist of parametric relations or empirical databases. Historical databases work reasonably well when applied to existing or conventional designs, however, they fail to predict accurately the weights and loads associated with unconventional designs (like the Low Boom Flight Demonstrator). There exists a need to augment existing historical databases with a physics-based methodology/capability for predicting the weights and loads of unconventional designs. In the current proposal, M4 Engineering will continue to streamline the structural layout process, improve the overall user experience, and develop a comprehensive suite of capabilities in an effort to build a complete weight statement for unconventional (and conventional) conceptual wing and fuselage designs. The main goal for this effort will be to develop a software tool capable of generating weight and load responses for unconventional designs from physics-based structural analysis simulations.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 742.92K | Year: 2014

ABSTRACT: M4 Engineering and Florida State University propose to develop methods for rapidly identifying store/aircraft configurations at elevated risk for adverse separation events. The methods developed will require from the user only data that is typically available prior to detailed influence load collection. One of the approaches will directly make use of independent parametric information for the store, bay, and ejector. Another approach will use these parameters to predict loads data and the ensuing trajectory response. The techniques developed in this effort will complement existing methods by prioritizing cases for investigation with more computationally expensive test and analysis methods.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 742.92K | Year: 2014

ABSTRACT: M4 Engineering and Florida State University propose to develop methods for rapidly identifying store/aircraft configurations at elevated risk for adverse separation events. The methods developed will require from the user only data that is typically available prior to detailed influence load collection. One of the approaches will directly make use of independent parametric information for the store, bay, and ejector. Another approach will use these parameters to predict loads data and the ensuing trajectory response. The techniques developed in this effort will complement existing methods by prioritizing cases for investigation with more computationally expensive test and analysis methods.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.71K | Year: 2014

Using its Phase I program results, M4 Engineering, Inc. and Sandia National Laboratories will continue to create a unique bonded joint analysis methodology and associated software. Surrogate traction-separation models will be created that efficiently capture the behavior that occurs for real bonded joints. Mixed mode loading, including compressive normal tractions and relative displacements will be captured and used in an extended cohesive zone element approach to be developed and implemented in Abaqus using its user subroutine interface. The mathematical forms for the surrogate traction-separation interface models will be developed and populated using high fidelity numerical models which include explicitly modeled adhesive layers. These models will utilize the nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive equation for polymers developed at Sandia. This material law captures the complete range of polymer behavior which cannot be captured fully by any known plasticity model. Furthermore, not only is this model useful for simulating variable thermal histories, it is also useful for predicting both adhesive and cohesive failure of polymer epoxies, as shown in the literature. An experimental program necessary to fully populate the high fidelity models and validate the surrogate traction-separation models will be conducted. Successful execution of this proposal will allow a commercially viable software tool to be marketed in Phase III.

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